Rediscovering Herbert Horne: Poet, Architect, Typographer, Art Historian

Rediscovering Herbert Horne: Poet, Architect, Typographer, Art Historian

£25.00
22.5 x 14.8 cm.

Herbert Horne (1864-1916) was a figure of alarming versatility: poet, architect, editor, essayist, typographer, designer of books, and the first scientific historian of art from the British Isles. His great book on Botticelli has been called by John Pope-Hennessy "the best monograph in English on an Italian painter." Horne's splendid editorship of the Century Guild Hobby Horse led Bernard Berenson and others to hail him as the successor of William Morris. Horne the connoisseur also gathered a choice selection of drawings and paintings which await closer appreciation. They are housed in his residence, now the Museo Horne, Florence, Italy.

In spite of his achievements he passes unmentioned in the Dictionary of National Biography, and aside from distinguished but brief discussions of his art activities by Fritz Sax and Frank Kermode, no book-length study has been devoted to him: until now.

Rediscovering Herbert Horne is Ian Fletcher's last book. Well known in the United States and Europe for his highly original scholarship, Fletcher provides an engaging account of the work of one of the more fascinating though elusive personages of the time. In his foreword, Peter Stansky says "Ian Fletcher has now presented us with a rich picture of Horne, in all the multiplicity of his talents and accomplishments."

Reproductions of Horne's designs and typography assist in effecting the re-emergence of this intriguing 1880-1920 figure.

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An Edwardian’s View of Dickens and His Illustrators: Harry Furniss’s ‘A Sketch of Boz’

An Edwardian’s View of Dickens and His Illustrators: Harry Furniss’s ‘A Sketch of Boz’

£25.00
25.5 x 17.8 cm.  xii, 116 pp.  2005  with 69 illus.

Harry Furniss (1854–1925) was a well-known if somewhat abrasive figure in English literary, artistic and political circles during the half century either side of 1900. In March 1905, at the invitation of the Dickens Fellowship, he delivered in London’s Memorial Hall a platform lecture on Dickens and his illustrators, “A Sketch of Boz,” illuminated by some sixty magic lantern slides. Over the next two years Furniss toured the provinces with an enlarged version of this lecture. An Edwardian’s View of Dickens and His Illustrators is an edited and annotated transcription of the unpublished manuscript of this engaging lecture, together with the original illustrations, some of which are Furniss’s own.

Few complete texts of oral lectures have survived and, coming from the pen (and pencil) of a professional book illustrator and keen Dickensian, “A Sketch of Boz” is an important document in the culture of Edwardian England.

Professor Cordery’s substantial introduction discusses how the lecture sheds light on a number of fields: Dickens’s reputation and that of his illustrators in the early twentieth century; the cultural significance of the platform lecture; the changing style of illustration and caricature; the commercial and ideological exploitation of Dickens at the turn of the century. He summarises the main illustrators surveyed by Furniss and includes more than 170 annotations. The book thus engages a variety of readers interested in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British literature and culture.

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