A Bibliography of the Writings of William Carleton

A Bibliography of the Writings of William Carleton

£35.00
ISBN: 978-0-86140-188-8
21.6 x 13.8 cm.   241 pp.  1985

William Carleton epitomised the search by nineteenth century Irish writers for a national identity. He spoke in the voice of the Irish peasant and was heard all over the literary world. His books, from the early collection Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (1830) to the late novel Willy Reilly (1855), were tremendously popular, running into many editions in Ireland, England and America. He revised, retitled, and regrouped his works frequently, producing a rich yet confusing body of work, which is fully explored and identified in the first part of this work, the first complete bibliography to have been compiled of the works of William Carleton.

Carleton wrote for a wide range of magazines, from the ultra-Protestant Christian Examiner to the ultra-Catholic Duffy’s Hibernian Magazine. He often used his magazine stories as the basis for later publication in book form, frequently altering and adapting. Dr. Hayley lists Carleton’s contributions to periodicals in their chronological order, also indicating when and where they later appeared. She then devotes a section to criticism of Carleton’s work as it appeared in a surprisingly wide variety of journals and newspapers, from the earliest criticism in his own time up to the present day.

Carleton’s work has long awaited a bibliographer, and Dr. Hayley gives it the full, detailed and illuminating treatment it deserves. It is absolutely essential for everyone studying or collecting his works.

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Supplement to ‘A Bibliography of George Moore’

Supplement to ‘A Bibliography of George Moore’

£25.00

23.5 x 15.0 cm.     xii, 96 pp.      1988

The purpose of this Supplement is to make available a portion of the new information discovered since the publication of A Bibliography, as well as to expand and correct data in the first ('Books and Pamphlets') and third ('Periodical Appearances') sections of that volume. It is an auxiliary volume, not an update. Anyone wishing to purchase both volumes of Edwin Gilcher's bibliographies direct from the publisher may obtain them together for the reduced price of £40.00, UK post free, enquire for cost of postage overseas.

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A Bibliography of George Moore

A Bibliography of George Moore

£40.00
ISBN: / 978-0-86140-067-6
22.5 x x 15.5 cm.      xiv, 274 pp.  1970 [Northern Illinois University Press] We have purchased their entire stock, and therefore allocated a new ISBN to this book.

This is the first comprehensive bibliography in En­glish and the most complete in any language of the works of George Moore, the Anglo-Irish author whom Charles Morgan described as having ‘twice recreated the English novel’. Moore was the first critic to write in English of the Impressionist painters and of the works of Verlaine, Rimbaud, and La­forgue. In addition, he was instrumental in helping to sound the death knell of the Victorian three-decker novel, and later was a leader – with W. B. Yeats, Edward Martyn, and Lady Gregory – in Ire­land’s literary renaissance. His writings and interests have been so diverse that few realise the scope of his work. During his life­time, Moore was frequently the storm centre of one controversy or another. While leading to many amusing tales about him, this has tended to cloud his very real contribution to English literature, both as an innovator and as an accomplished artist. To achieve the perfection he constantly sought, Moore revised and rewrote probably more than any other modern .author, yet the resulting textual differences in various editions have scarcely been noted. Two previous bibliographies (both published nearly fifty years ago and more than ten years prior to Moore’s death) do not approach completeness; neither makes more than casual mention of revised texts, and neither notes translations and periodical appearances. Both limit consideration to English editions, al­though in some cases the American printings were the earliest.

This bibliography, which had its genesis more than thirty years ago, is based primarily on Edwin Gilcher’s personal collection, but every description has been checked against as many other copies as possible. It fully describes all works in first editions, both En­glish and American, and all subsequent editions con­taining substantial revisions, as well as, for the sake of collectors, the various limited and illustrated edi­tions. As far as possible all editions have been noted so that a student can quickly determine which text has been reprinted in any particular edition.

The first section, by far the longest, contains de­scriptions of all titles associated with Moore, includ­ing early works excluded by the author from the canon of his collected editions, and also pamphlets and occasional printings. The second section is de­voted to books by other authors which contain con­tributions by Moore and which reprint letters of his. The third section lists periodical printings, and this listing is the most extensive that has been made to date. The fourth section lists the books, stories, and articles translated into thirteen foreign languages. The final section gives brief accounts of titles some­times attributed to Moore, but actually not by him, and of works known to have been written by him, in­cluding a number of plays, which have never been published.

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Rediscovering Herbert Horne: Poet, Architect, Typographer, Art Historian

Rediscovering Herbert Horne: Poet, Architect, Typographer, Art Historian

£25.00
22.5 x 14.8 cm.

Herbert Horne (1864-1916) was a figure of alarming versatility: poet, architect, editor, essayist, typographer, designer of books, and the first scientific historian of art from the British Isles. His great book on Botticelli has been called by John Pope-Hennessy "the best monograph in English on an Italian painter." Horne's splendid editorship of the Century Guild Hobby Horse led Bernard Berenson and others to hail him as the successor of William Morris. Horne the connoisseur also gathered a choice selection of drawings and paintings which await closer appreciation. They are housed in his residence, now the Museo Horne, Florence, Italy.

In spite of his achievements he passes unmentioned in the Dictionary of National Biography, and aside from distinguished but brief discussions of his art activities by Fritz Sax and Frank Kermode, no book-length study has been devoted to him: until now.

Rediscovering Herbert Horne is Ian Fletcher's last book. Well known in the United States and Europe for his highly original scholarship, Fletcher provides an engaging account of the work of one of the more fascinating though elusive personages of the time. In his foreword, Peter Stansky says "Ian Fletcher has now presented us with a rich picture of Horne, in all the multiplicity of his talents and accomplishments."

Reproductions of Horne's designs and typography assist in effecting the re-emergence of this intriguing 1880-1920 figure.

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Arthur Symons: A Bibliography

Arthur Symons: A Bibliography

£35.00
Arthur Symons (1865-1945), now widely regarded as the most important critic of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, is best known for his seminal work, The Symbolist Movement in Literature (1900). Shortly after Symons's mental breakdown in 1908, his close friend W. B. Yeats called him ‘the best critic of his generation’ and in 1957, Frank Kermode, in Romantic Image, referred to Symons as a ‘crucial’ figure in the development of Modernism, ‘always at the centre of his period and herald of its successor’.

One of the most prolific writers of his time, Symons produced some 60 volumes and pamphlets of poetry and prose; edited, introduced, or contributed poetry and prose to scores of volumes; wrote over 1300 articles and reviews for periodicals and newspapers; and translated works by such noted writers as Zola, Baudelaire, Verhaeren, Verlaine, Villiers de 1'Isle-Adam, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Casanova, Alexandre Dumas fils, and d’Annunzio.

Until now, such vast productivity has never been fully accounted for and bibliographically described. Karl Beckson, Ian Fletcher, Lawrence W. Markert, and John Stokes – all specialists in the 1880-1920 period and all having previously published on Arthur Symons – have collaborated on this comprehensive bibliography to produce a scholarly and reliable reference work that will provide little known details of Symons's immense oeuvre. This book will remain an indispensable source of research for decades to come. ISBN: 978-0-944318-04-1 More info →

Arthur Symons, Critic Among Critics: An Annotated Bibliography

Arthur Symons, Critic Among Critics: An Annotated Bibliography

£50.00

Arthur Symons’s (1865–1945) prominence at the end of the nineteenth century and subsequent influence on early-twentieth-century literature is well established. His biographer Karl Beckson aptly calls him “a major figure who helped stimulate the Modernist initiative.”

The breadth of his artistic interests and critical commentary remains extraordinary. In addition to writing short stories, poems, plays, travel sketches, and translations, Symons was a prolific critic and editor who wrote about literature and what he termed “the seven arts.” Yeats famously offered him the laurel “best critic of his generation.” Symons championed freedom of subject matter and literary style and thus influenced the work of Yeats, Eliot, Pound, Joyce, and others, particularly in introducing them to the evocative work of French symbolist writers.

Arthur Symons, Critic Among Critics: An Annotated Bibliography documents the scholarly attention Symons continues to receive not only for his critical influence, but for his own creative work. This annotated bibliography captures over 1000 articles, books, reviews, dissertations, and other writings about Symons, revising and updating Carol Simpson Stern’s 1974 bibliography published in English Literature in Transition, 1880–1920. Over 700 new items appear, some of these from unsigned articles now identified as written by authors such as Virginia Woolf and John Middleton Murry.

The book, arranged alphabetically by author with annotations in paraphrase style, includes a helpful index and provides a chronological list of works published from the1880s to 2005 that will prove useful in tracing the evolution of criticism about Symons. Arthur Symons, Critic Among Critics joins ELT Press’s Arthur Symons: A Bibliography (1990), which covers the primary works, to give scholars a comprehensive view of his writings.

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The Irish Book Lover. An Irish Studies Reader

The Irish Book Lover. An Irish Studies Reader

£40.00
With an Introductory Lecture by Nicholas Allen and an Integrated Index by Bruce Stewart.

The Irish Book Lover ranks as the longest-lasting of all twentieth-century Irish literary journals, with a run of 227 issues published under the editorships of John S. Crone (1909-25), Séamus Ó Casaide (1928-1930) and Colm Ó Lochlainn (1930-57). As a bibliographical and reviewing journal rather than a forum for commentary, poetry or fiction, it is less often consulted than literary journals such as the Irish Review or The Bell but nevertheless illustrates with great clarity some of the key changes in modern Irish culture and society between 1909 and 1957.

While offering a unique source of information on older, antiquarian books in Ireland, The Irish Book Lover throws open a window on the attitude of the contemporary intelligentsia to works such as James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist and W. B. Yeats’s Responsibilities, the novels of Liam O’Flaherty and Kate O’Brien or those of less-remembered writers of the day such as Temple Lane and Mrs. Thomas Concannon. Though superseded by a variety of reviewing organs, it gives an inspiring example to Irish book lovers in our own time.

The Princess Grace Irish Library has compiled a sampler of the journal here, together with an index of the entire series. The present volume also contains the introductory lecture given by Dr. Nicholas Allen at the “Irish Book Lover” Symposium held in Monaco to commemorate the journal. The symposium was also afforded a planned opportunity to survey existing resources for Irish literary history in the company of fifteen Irish publishers, librarians, teachers, critics and – last but not least – owners of Irish-studies websites.

The present volume is mirrored on the PGIL EIRData website, giving access to a body of digitised text that embraces a wider selection of the long-running journal together with an electronic index of its pages. This new departure for Irish studies has been conducted by Dr. Bruce Stewart under the terms of a contract between the Ireland Fund of Monaco to the University of Ulster under the aegis of the Princess Grace Irish Library (Monaco).

Bruce Stewart was Lecturer in Irish Literary History and Bibliography at the University of Ulster and Literary Adviser (Conseiller Littèraire) of the Princess Grace Irish Library in Monaco and director of the Library’s Biennial Symposium Series. He has edited three volumes in the Princess Grace Irish Library series and managed the production of several more. His articles and essays have been published in several leading Irish journals including Irish Review and Studies. Born in Dublin and educated at Glenstal Abbey School, Trinity College, Dublin, and the University of California, he has studied, worked and taught in America, the Middle East and England as well as Northern Ireland.

Contents

Editor’s Preface

Nicholas Allen: Introductory Lecture

The Irish Book Lover: An Irish Studies Reader

The Irish Book Lover: An Integrated Index

Bruce Stewart: Afterword

Appendix I: Chronology of Issues

Appendix II: Participants & Programme

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Oscar Wilde, Recent Research

Oscar Wilde, Recent Research

£39.00
A Supplement to Oscar Wilde Revalued.

Oscar Wilde Revalued, published by ELT Press in 1993, earned praise from Wilde scholars in the USA and Europe. Now, at the centenary of Wilde’s death, Professor Small’s 1993 book is succeeded by a completely new work, one that will also become essential for students of Wilde.

Oscar Wilde: Recent Research updates and reconceptualises the bibliographic objectives of the earlier volume, and surveys research on Wilde from 1992 to 2000, but in a much more explicitly evaluative manner.

The opening chapter, ‘Wilde in the 1990s’, traces the main directions of Wilde research over the past decade. Critical material is then reviewed under three broad categories. The first, ‘Biography’, is concerned with the continuing fascination with Wilde’s life, and its emphasis on how critics have moved on from dissatisfaction with Richard Ellmann’s Oscar Wilde (1987).

‘Recent Critical Paradigms’ evaluates research channelled through master-narratives that have emerged in the 1990s, ways of describing Wilde’s work: the ‘gay’ Wilde, the ‘Irish’ Wilde, and ‘Wilde and Consumerism’. ‘Wilde the Writer’, the third category, centres on an important trend in research during the last decade, what might be thought the less glamorous aspects of the oeuvre – from the seriousness with which Wilde took his role as a poet, to the sheer amount of time he devoted to writing journalism, to the complexities of the production and staging of his plays.

Oscar Wilde: Recent Research also contains sections devoted to sources and intertexts, to thematic studies, to essay collections, and to critical monographs which take Wilde as their sole subject. The book includes information about new research resources, and about manuscript discoveries and letters. It concludes with an extensive bibliography organised alphabetically and in terms of Wilde’s works, and an index of critics.

IAN SMALL has a personal chair in English literature at the University of Birmingham. He has written widely on a variety of literary figures and topics in the 1880-1920 era. He is co-general editor of the Oxford English Texts edition of The Complete Works of Oscar Wilde. Among his many publications are Oscar Wilde’s Profession: Writing and the Culture Industry in the Late Nineteenth Century (with Josephine M.Guy, OUP, 2000); Oscar Wilde Revalued (ELT Press, 1993); Politics and Value in English Studies: A Discipline in Crisis? (with Jacqueline M.Guy, CUP, 1993), and Conditions for Criticism (OUP, 1991).

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Irish Literature in English, The Romantic Period

Irish Literature in English, The Romantic Period

£30.00 each

Vol 1 ISBN: 0-86140-272-3 / 978-0-901072-272-4 £30.00
Vol 2 ISBN:0-86140-273-1 / 978-0-901072-273-1 £30.00
The Pair ISBN: 0-901072-40-0 / 978-0-901072-40-5 £60.00

Originally advertised as Ireland and Romanticism, Patrick Rafroidi’s work is a revised and updated translation of his much acclaimed L’Irlande et le romantisme (1972). It is now published for the first time in English in two volumes, the first a study of the period and its authors, and the second an important work of reference on all the Irish literary figures of the time.

The study is divided into three sections, ‘Prelude to Romanticism’, ‘Nationalist Romanticism’, and ‘The Impact of Irish Romanticism’, with extensive notes and an index. Professor Rafroidi studies the causes of the movement, how it was influenced by political and literary landmarks of the time, and how the authors themselves influenced others, not only in England but also in the United States, in France and in Germany, and their rediscovery and use of Ireland’s early history and myths.

The reference section contains a general bibliography, bio-bibliographies of the Irish authors whose work was published between 1789 and 1850, information as to the performances of their plays in the most important theatres in the British Isles, and a list of the principal Irish periodicals of the time.

This is therefore a most useful work for all those interested in the period, and the bibliographies make it an essential work of reference which all libraries and students of Anglo-Irish Literature will need on their shelves, for continuous referral.

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Ireland and the Celtic Connection

Ireland and the Celtic Connection

£5.99
In his lecture given at the Princess Grace Irish Library, Monaco, in September 1985, Professor Glanville Price surveys relations between Ireland and the other Celtic nations from prehistoric times to the late twentieth century. The lecture is supplemented by an up-to-date bibliography of some 500 items compiled by Morfydd E.Owen that will serve as an introduction to the study of such fields as the archaeology, history and art of the ancient Celts and the history, languages, literature and folklore of the modern Celtic nations (Ireland, Scotland, the Isle of Man, Wales, Cornwall and Brittany). More info →
J.M.Barrie, An Annotated Secondary Bibliography

J.M.Barrie, An Annotated Secondary Bibliography

£35.00
22.8 x 15.2 cm.   xxvi, 440 pp.       1989

Sir James Matthew Barrie (1860-1937) is cherished interna­tionally for his delightful children’s tale Peter Pan, reprised in numer­ous forms as play, musical, and animated film.

Yet Barrie’s contribution to English literature carries far beyond his Immortal Peter Pan. He estab­lished a following as an essayist, achieved great success as a novelist, then turned from the novel to even greater successes in the theatre. There, decades later, works such as The Admirable Crichton and What Every Woman Knows were still being applauded in London’s West End and on Broadway, subse­quently pleasing even larger audi­ences in their film and television versions.

As a successful playwright, Barrie Joined his efforts with those of Bernard Shaw and Harley Granville Barker in helping to establish the ‘theatre of the play­wright’, a movement which revo­lutionised theatrical production by effectively breaking the strangle­hold grip of the old ‘star system’ and revitalised the British theatre during the first decade of this century.

Professor Markgraf has assidu­ously compiled and annotated over 5,000 items relevant to Barrie’s life and work. For decades to come this bibliography will be an essential source of research, not only for scholars who pursue Barrie’s career but for those interested in the era in which he worked.

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William Allingham, An Annotated Bibliography

William Allingham, An Annotated Bibliography

£11.95
21.5 x 14.7 cm.   107 pp. 1984

Colin Smythe Ltd acquired copies of this title from the Lebanese Establishment for Publishing & Printing Services, hence our allocation of one of our ISBNs to it.

William Allingham: An Anno­tated Bibliography introduces a neglected Anglo-Irish poet: it pro­vides a survey of his published volumes of poetry and prose as well as his literary contributions to journals and magazines. In addi­tion, it gives a list of the poet’s published and unpublished corres­pondence with well-established literary figures, notably Tennyson, Carlyle, Browning, D.G. Rossetti, Emerson and others. Moreover, the work provides a record of 19th Century as well as modem Alling­ham scholarship and criticism.

It is hoped that this Bibliography will facilitate future research on Allingham.

CONTENTS
Preface
Introduction
I. Bibliographies
II. Primary Sources
A. Books
B. Poems and Prose works published in magazines, periodicals and books
III.  Secondary Sources
A. Books on or including discussion of Allingham
B. Reviews and articles on or including discussions of Allingham
IV.  Unpublished correspondence
V. Unpublished dissertations

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