Goodnight, Morning

Goodnight, Morning

£8.99
Author:
Genre: Fiction
Tag: Goodnight Morning
Jo Rippier was born in Plymouth in 1935, and educated at King’s School Worcester and Emmanuel College Cambridge. He gained his Ph.D. in English Literature at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitatät, where he was a lecturer in the English Department until retiring in 1998. His previous publications include The Short Stories of Sean O’Faolain: A Study in Descriptive Techniques,and Some Postwar English Novelists, a volume of short stories, Goodnight, Morning, and collections of poetry, Seasons and Remembrance (1981), Beginnings, Endings (1991), Past Present (1996), Against the Stream (1999, with aquarelles by Gerhard Elsner), Late Motley (2001), Something Old, Something New (2007), Echoes and Reflections (2009), Footsteps (2011), The Silence of Snow (2013), Darkness and Light (2014), and Shadows (2015). More info →
Moments in Time

Moments in Time

£8.99
Author:
Genre: Fiction
Tag: Moments in Time
ISBN 978-0-86140-454-4

These short stories are in general an attempt to recapture and encapsulate aspects of a distant past that will soon have faded for ever. Tiny scenes, events and memories are brought back in the form of a reality that has, through the workings of time, become fictionalised. Who now knows what the reality actually was?

Jo Rippier was born in Plymouth in 1935, and educated at King’s School Worcester and Emmanuel College Cambridge. He gained his Ph.D. in English Literature at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitatät, where he was a lecturer in the English Department until retiring in 1998. His previous publications include The Short Stories of Sean O’Faolain: A Study in Descriptive Techniques (1976), Some Post-war English Novelists, a volume of short stories, Goodnight, Morning, and collections of poetry, Seasons and Remembrance (1981), Beginnings, Endings (1991), Past Present (1996), Against the Stream (1999, with aquarelles by Gerhard Elsner), Late Motley (2001), Something Old, Something New (2007), Echoes and Reflections (2009), Footsteps (2011), The Silence of Snow (2013), Darkness and Light (2014), and Shadows (2015). More info →

The Untilled Field

The Untilled Field

£8.99
Author:
Genre: Fiction
Tag: Untilled Field
With an Introduction by Richard Allen Cave
21.6 x 13.8 cm.      xxxiv, 225 pp.   1903, and revised by Moore in 1926, and 1931.
This edition first published in 2000

Bubbling with enthusiasm for the revival of Gaelic in Ireland, George Moore suggested to the Gaelic League that it should publish a translation of a modern work that children might study in school and that artists might imitate and so begin a new tradition of Gaelic Literature. It was a sensible idea that was delayed at first for want of agreement within the League over a suitable text. Spurred on by his friends, Moore himself then set about writing some tales of Irish life for this end. They were translated by Taidgh O’Donohue and published in 1902 in the New Ireland Review. Later a collection of these and more stories appeared under the title An T-Úr-Gort, Sgéalta; a version of this, reworked by Moore in English as The Untilled Field, followed in 1903. It proved subsequently the one of his works that pleased Moore best for its affectionate portraits of Irish rural life.

Though modelled initially on Turgenev’s Tales of a Sportsman, the stories soon became original inspirations woven out of Moore’s memories of the peasants who lived and worked on his family estate in Mayo. Moore took as his theme the pathos of their existence: the bleakness; the imaginative, cultural and emotional austerity that compelled many, often whole parishes, to emigrate and leave their homes in ruins; the indefatigable resilience of those who stayed and endured; and the fragile consolations offered by their religion. The painfulness of his subjects he offset by the gentle humour of his treatment. Moore’s antipathy to the Catholic clergy was soon to become notorious but the tragi-comic plight of the parish priest who finds his power and moral authority undermined by the poverty of his parishioners and the cunning they develop in order to survive provokes in these tales some barbed satire but much compassion and amusement. The delicacy of discrimination, the emotional control that reveals Moore’s understanding and pity through a technique of powerful understatement is unusual in his work and unusual too in the tradition of Irish fiction.

Moore once wrote of The Untilled Field: ‘It is a dry book and does not claim the affections at once.’ But Moore was wrong: level and dispassionate in tone it may be, but the book is one of the richest and most perfectly written of his works and the depth of feeling that went into its composition is evident throughout.

This new printing of the text of the 1931 edition also contains the texts of ‘In the Clay’ and ‘The Way Back’ which Moore omitted from that edition. It has an Introduction by Richard Allen Cave.

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The Lake

The Lake

£8.99
Author:
Genre: Fiction
Tag: Lake
With an Afterword by Richard Allen Cave
ISBN: 978-0-901072-82-5
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     xii,  274 pp.   1980

The Lake is George Moore’s most poetic and perfectly crafted novel. It tells of a priest’s loss not of faith, but of commitment to the principles fostered in him during his training and his discovery of a more fulfilling religion that celebrates instinct as being, if rightly understood, man’s true mode of communion with his soul. Father Gogarty’s parish is in a remote district of Mayo beside Lough Carra and his new philosophy is worked out during his long walks and rides round the lake where he learns how the changing quality of his perceptions of the landscape about him can reveal the fluctuating moods of that ‘underlife’ of his psyche that shapes his being.

The Lake is a novel about self-discovery through guilt (Gogarty fears he has brought about the death of a parishioner through vigorously denouncing her way of life from the altar) and atonement in renouncing a creed which demands that a man continually repress his capacity for joy. But it is also a novel about the satisfactions of living close to nature in Ireland; the atmosphere of the Mayo countryside, the play of light on mountain, wood and lake, the rich historical associations in every church, castle or abbey ruin and farmstead are evoked with a rare skill, subtly illuminating the relationship that Moore takes as his theme between place and the Irish personality. If in studying the motives that compel his priest to the decision, ‘Non Serviam’, Moore is establishing a pattern in Irish fiction that Joyce will elaborate with his Portrait of an Artist, then in his poetic rendering of consciousness as the sum of a character’s perceptions, Moore is anticipating the technique of Virginia Woolf and Elizabeth Bowen.

Published in 1905, The Lake underwent considerable revision in two further editions before Moore was satisfied with its complex form and the disciplined style that form exacted. (The present edition reprints the last revised text of 1921.) In an Afterword, Professor Richard Allen Cave of Royal Holloway, University of London, examines the nature of this discipline, the influence of Zola and of Dujardin on Moore’s choice of a structure: and the ways first the composition and later the revision of The Lake were made easier by the writing of the stories in The Untilled Field (1903) and the autobiography, Hail and Farewell! (1911-1914). Significantly, all three works – each a masterpiece of its kind and, viewed together, the triumph of Moore’s career – were the product of the novelist’s return to his native land to champion the cause of the Irish renaissance. With them Moore gave to Irish fiction a new method and a new voice and, before Joyce and Beckett, set exacting standards of scruple and dedication in the pursuit of a finished artistry in prose.

Richard Allen Cave, Emeritus Professor of Drama and Theatre Arts at Royal Holloway in the University of London, has published extensively in the fields of renaissance drama (Jonson, Webster, Brome), modern English and Irish theatre (Wilde, Yeats, Pinter, Beckett, Friel, Mc Guinness), dance (Ninette de Valois, Robert Helpmann), stage design (Charles Ricketts, Robert Gregory) and direction (Terence Gray). Most recently, he devised and was General Editor of an AHRC-funded project to create an online edition of The Collected Plays of Richard Brome (2010), and published the monograph, Collaborations: Ninette de Valois and William Butler Yeats (2011). The Collected Brome is soon to be published in a more traditional book-format by Oxford University Press (2020). He has also edited the plays of Wilde, Yeats and T.C. Murray; and the manuscript versions of Yeats’s The King of the Great Clock Tower and A Full Moon in March. Professor Cave is a trained Feldenkrais practitioner who works on vocal techniques with professional actors and on extending movement skills with performers in physical theatre.

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Hail and Farewell! Ave – Salve – Vale

Hail and Farewell! Ave – Salve – Vale

£16.99
ISBN: 978-0-86140-198-7
21.6 x 13.8 cm. 774 pp.  with four  illustrations by Grace Plunkett

Hail and Farewell! can be considered George Moore’s masterpiece. Since it was first published, it has coloured many people’s view of the Irish Literary Revival and its members – W.B.Yeats, Lady Gregory, George W. Russell (AE), Edward Martyn, Sir Horace Plunkett, and J.M.Synge.

It is a prodigious work, containing Moore’s assessment of the Irish Literary Revival, the Abbey Theatre and its predecessors, as well as remarkable insights not only into the literature and tastes in painting (particularly French Impressionism) and music (the influence of Wagner and the revival of polyphony) at the beginning of the twentieth century, but into the social and religious background to the Irish scene at that time – all viewed through his eyes, the eyes not only of an Irish country gentleman, but of a European man of letters. First published 1911-14, Moore revised it for the second edition (1925), and the text remained the same for the Uniform (1933) and Ebury (1937) Editions. This is the first edition to appear since then, and uses the most recent text.

At the time of its first publication most of the references were readily understood by George Moore’s readers, but they are now obscure: much is lost to the modern reader as a result of a lack of intimate knowledge of the people and their times. Professor Cave has tracked down all the points and references that would be obscure today, often even to the student of that period, and has produced detailed notes on them. Thus the reader is able to understand all Moore’s references and his modifications of the truth and chronological sequences. Light is also thrown on many obscure pseudonyms and passages in the text through more than 600 notes and a comprehensive index provided by Professor Cave.

Many critics have considered that of all the works of Anglo-Irish Literature that deserve to be kept permanently in print, their first choice would be Hail and Farewell!. This edition of such a monumental work is therefore is of the greatest interest and use to scholar and general reader alike.

Richard Allen Cave, Emeritus Professor of Drama and Theatre Arts at Royal Holloway in the University of London, has published extensively in the fields of renaissance drama (Jonson, Webster, Brome), modern English and Irish theatre (Wilde, Yeats, Pinter, Beckett, Friel, McGuinness), dance (Ninette de Valois, Robert Helpmann), stage design (Charles Ricketts, Robert Gregory) and direction (Terence Gray). Most recently, he devised and was General Editor of an AHRC-funded project to create an online edition of The Collected Plays of Richard Brome (2010), and published the monograph, Collaborations: Ninette de Valois and William Butler Yeats (2011). The Collected Brome is soon to be published in a more traditional book-format by Oxford University Press (2020). He has also edited the plays of Wilde, Yeats and T.C. Murray; and the manuscript versions of Yeats’s The King of the Great Clock Tower and A Full Moon in March. Professor Cave is a trained Feldenkrais practitioner who works on vocal techniques with professional actors and on extending movement skills with performers in physical theatre.

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A Drama in Muslin

A Drama in Muslin

£9.50
Author:
Genre: Fiction
Tag: Drama in Muslin
ISBN: 978-0-86140-056-0
21.6 x 13.8 cm       xvi, 329 pp.   1981

Always an ambitious novelist, George Moore realised early in the composition of his third novel, A Drama in Muslin, how his chosen subject – the sentimental education of five girls born into the gentry of the West of Ireland – could be extended to encompass a study of the prevailing social conditions of the Irish people, who were desperate for political change and growth.

Written in the mid 1880s, the novel reflects the unease of the times when the activities of the Land League began increasingly to jeopardise the security of the landlords and expose the artificiality and moral inadequacies of their way of life, centred on the annual Dublin seasons and receptions at the Castle. Fresh from their convent school, Alice and Olive Barton, with the aid of their mother (one of Moore’s most brilliant portraits), are set in quest of their identities and in pursuit of a husband, for as Mrs Barton asserts 'Marriage gives a girl liberty, gives her admiration, gives her success, a woman’s whole position depends upon it’. Alice, the more observant and intelligent of the two, quickly appreciates how completely their choices in life are conditioned by the social tensions of the age, which render words like ‘liberty’ and ‘success’ meaningless. Her growth in sensibility is everywhere matched by developing moral insights and discriminations about her class which compel her finally to renounce her background. Moore himself came of the Mayo gentry but his sympathies, like his father’s before him, were Nationalist and liberal.

As Professor Jeffares shows in his stimulating introduction, Moore’s own shocked awakening to the real nature of his financial position (which in fact compelled him to become a novelist) exactly mirrors Alice Barton’s: he knew, as she comes to know, the difficulty in their particular condition of balancing private and social obligations which is the essence of integrity, yet the necessity of doing so is felt on their very nerve ends. Moore analyses the plight of the landlords from within and, though a prophetic note of doom is sustained throughout, his personal involvement in their cause ensures that criticism is matched with sympathy; for all the moral anger that shapes the book, Moore never simplifies the issues he explores. In later life Moore considered A Drama in Muslin had one of the best subjects he had ever conceived; and as Professor Jeffares concludes, it remains ‘with its mixture of satire and sympathy, objectivity and panoramic range of vision one of its creator’s most intelligent insights into, human life’.

A. Norman Jeffares was Professor of English at the University of Stirling, an Honorary Fellow of Trinity College Dublin, and of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. He was Vice-Chairman of the Scottish Arts Council, a member of the Arts Council of Great Britain and Life-President of the International Association for the study of Anglo-Irish Literature. His literary interests include Commonwealth and American Literature; he edited Restoration Drama for the Folio Society, but he is best known in Ireland for his work on such authors as Swift, Congreve, Farquhar, Goldsmith, Sheridan, Maria Edgeworth, Lady Morgan, Lever, George Moore and W. B. Yeats.

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The Cock and Anchor, Being a Chronicle of Old Dublin City

The Cock and Anchor, Being a Chronicle of Old Dublin City

£35.00
Edited by Jan Jędrzejewski

21.6 x 13.8 cm.      xxviii, 489 pp.     Ulster Editions & Monographs series (ISSN 0954-3392) volume 9

First published in 1845, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's The Cock and Anchor is one of the most interesting historical novels written in Ireland in the nineteenth century. It is many things: a record of the mores and manners of early eighteenth-century Ireland, a story of love struggling against the prejudices of class and religion, a penetrating moral study of crime and punishment, an engaging thriller. But first of all it is a full-bodied, energetic, lively picture of Dublin - its palaces and its inns, its streets, its people, its way of life. Written in the early years of Le Fanu's career as a novelist, it provides an exciting introduction to the work of one the most intriguing novelists of Victorian Ireland.

The Editor has provided notes, notes on the text and appendices which give the major and minor textual variants of the tale, and nearly thirty pages of contemporary reviews published in Ireland, England and Scotland.

Educated at the University of Łódź, Poland, and Worcester College, Oxford, Professor Jan Jędrzejewski is Dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Ulster. He wrote Thomas Hardy and the Church (1996), edited a selection of Thomas Hardy's short fiction Outside the Gates of the World (1996), and published numerous papers on Victorian fiction, modern Irish literature, and Anglo-Polish literary relations.

Front cover illustration (continuing onto the front flap): 'A Prospect of the City of Dublin from the Magazine Hill, in his Majesty's Phoenix Park' by Joseph Tudor, issued in 1753.

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The Romance of Cearbhall and Fearbhlaidh

The Romance of Cearbhall and Fearbhlaidh

£9.95
21.3 x 13.5 cm.   80 pp.   1985  Dolmen Texts 7
ISBN: 978-0-85105-409-4
The Romance of Cearbhall and Fearbhlaidh: a medieval Irish tale, here first translated into English by James E. Doan

The Romance of Cearbhall and Fearbhlaidh (Bas Chearbhaill agus Fhearbhhidhe in the original Irish) was probably composed during the mid-fifteenth century. It deals with the love and tragic death of the poet, Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh of Corcomroe, in County Clare, and Fearbhlaidh, the daughter of Séamas, king of Scotland. Although the romance is entirely fictional, some of the characters are based on historical figures, such as Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh, ollamh of Corcomroe, who died in 1404. Much of the romance is derived from early Irish myth and legend, tales such as The Wooing of Etain and The Dream of Oengus.

This translation is the first to appear in English, and includes both the prose and poetry found in the manuscript. Dr Doan's introduction deals with the manuscript tradition, the historical background, the composition, the poetry and the later tradition of the romance.

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The Horse of Selene

The Horse of Selene

£7.99
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     175 pp.    1975 [Dolmen Press]

This unique novel is firmly rooted in the Irish tradi­tion which produced such masterpieces as At-Swim-Two-Birds by Flann O’Brien, Murphy by Samuel Beckett and The Girl with the Green Eyes by Edna O’Brien. Her splendid insight into what living is all about is tempered by a keen wit, ably displayed in The Horse of Selene, her story of the confrontation between modern youth and its freedom and the older civilisation of the Western World.

When The Horse of Selene was first published it was noticed by The New York Times as ‘a remarkable first novel by a remarkable woman’, The Guardian reviewer found the book ‘lively and good’ and The New Statesman said, ‘Not often can a reader say that she wants to begin the book again immediately she’s finished, or at whatever page the book opens read on from there, yet this is exactly how I reacted’.

Juanita Casey’s father and her Irish mother were both gypsies. Neither conventional education nor a conventional life suited her and she is largely self- taught, basing her technique on experience. First married at sixteen, she has lived a nomadic life ever since with her family and her animals.

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Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, Vol.2

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, Vol.2

£9.95
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     with all the original illustrative etchings

 Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry can be considered to be Carleton’s greatest work. It went through a number of transformations before the ‘definitive edition’ was published in 1842-44. This edition was the last that Carleton actually oversaw; thus it is the culmination of his own work on the collection, and for this reason is the edition we publish.

Traits and Stories contains a wealth of illustrations by famous illustra­tors of the time. They give a good impression of the tales themselves, being crowded with laughing, weeping, fighting, working, playing, dying, and praying peasants in sublime scenery, poverty-stricken cot­tages, cosy public houses, trim farms, broken-down barns, hillside chapels, hedge schools, and hovels. The inhabitants of Carleton’s world are villains, scholars, horse-thieves, pig-drivers, priests, farmers and shopkeepers. He aimed to show the Irish peasant honestly to the world, choosing simple, strong plots. Contemporary critics praised Carleton most for the ‘light and shade’ of his depictions of Irish charac­ter, and much of his power lies in the combination and contracts of light and shade, good and evil, fun and tragedy. He is a writer of great comic genius, as well as being able to convey the horrors of poverty and the peasant life.

He conveys, too, a sense of urgency. What he was describing was an Ireland of his youth that was passing or had already passed, hence his often lengthy annotations about the traditions, tales, customs and pas­times that he even then considered necessary for his readership.

A fine ability to tell a story distinguishes Carleton from many contem­porary purveyors of folklore and folk life, and this contributed to his immense popularity in Ireland, England and across the Atlantic in the United States and Canada. There appeared over 50 editions of Traits and Stories, containing some or all the stories of the ‘Definitive Edition’, in the 19th Century alone. No other work of the first half of the 19th Century conveys so well the rural life of the period. Apart from being immensely entertaining, these stories are essential reading for the literary and history student of that period. This is the only com­plete printing of the ‘Definitive Edition’ presently available.

Volume 2 contains 'Geography of an Irish Oath' – 'The Lianhan Shee' – 'Going to Maynooth' – 'Phelim O'Toole's Courtship' – 'The Poor Scholar' – 'Wildgoose Lodge' – 'Tubber Derg'; or 'The Red Well' – 'Neal Malone'

 

Barbara Hayley died in a road accident at the time she was Professor of English at St Patrick’s College, Maynooth. Her publications include Carleton’s Traits and Stories and the 19th Century Anglo-Irish Tradition (1983), and A Bibliography of the Writings of William Carleton (1985). Her Carleton’s Alterations to ‘Traits & Stories of the Irish Peasantry’ is not yet published.

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Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, Vol.1

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, Vol.1

£9.95
With an Introduction by Barbara Hayley

21.6 x 13.8 cm.     with all the original illustrative etchings

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry can be considered to be Carleton’s greatest work. It went through a number of transformations before the ‘definitive edition’ was published in 1842-44. This edition was the last that Carleton actually oversaw; thus it is the culmination of his own work on the collection, and for this reason is the edition we publish.

Traits and Stories contains a wealth of illustrations by famous illustra­tors of the time. They give a good impression of the tales themselves, being crowded with laughing, weeping, fighting, working, playing, dying, and praying peasants in sublime scenery, poverty-stricken cot­tages, cosy public houses, trim farms, broken-down barns, hillside chapels, hedge schools, and hovels. The inhabitants of Carleton’s world are villains, scholars, horse-thieves, pig-drivers, priests, farmers and shopkeepers. He aimed to show the Irish peasant honestly to the world, choosing simple, strong plots. Contemporary critics praised Carleton most for the ‘light and shade’ of his depictions of Irish charac­ter, and much of his power lies in the combination and contracts of light and shade, good and evil, fun and tragedy. He is a writer of great comic genius, as well as being able to convey the horrors of poverty and the peasant life.

He conveys, too, a sense of urgency. What he was describing was an Ireland of his youth that was passing or had already passed, hence his often lengthy annotations about the traditions, tales, customs and pas­times that he even then considered necessary for his readership.

A fine ability to tell a story distinguishes Carleton from many contem­porary purveyors of folklore and folk life, and this contributed to his immense popularity in Ireland, England and across the Atlantic in the United States and Canada. There appeared over 50 editions of Traits and Stories, containing some or all the stories of the ‘Definitive Edition’, in the 19th Century alone. No other work of the first half of the 19th Century conveys so well the rural life of the period. Apart from being immensely entertaining, these stories are essential reading for the literary and history student of that period. This is the only com­plete printing of the ‘Definitive Edition’ presently available.

Volume 1 contains Professor Hayley’s foreword Carleton’s Auto-biographical Introduction – 'Ned M'Keown' – 'The Three Tasks' – 'Shane Fadh's Wedding – 'Larry M'Farland's Wake' – 'The Battle of the Factions' – 'The Station' – 'The Party Fight and Funeral' – 'The Lough Derg Pilgrim' – 'The Hedge School' – 'The Midnight Mass' – 'The Donagh', or 'The Horse-stealers' – 'Phil Purcel the Pig-Driver'.

Barbara Hayley died in a road accident at the time she was Professor of English at St Patrick’s College, Maynooth. Her publications include Carleton’s Traits and Stories and the 19th Century Anglo-Irish Tradition (1983), and A Bibliography of the Writings of William Carleton (1985). Her Carleton’s Alterations to ‘Traits & Stories of the Irish Peasantry’ is not yet published.

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Great Legends of Wales

Great Legends of Wales

£16.99
ISBN: 978-0-86140-317-2
21.6 x 13.8 cm.   xvi, 156 pp.  1991

These ten original tales, some dating from the 11th century, have been painstakingly unearthed and written up by Ronald Barnes. Several of these stories surfaced in Yorkshire, whence Welsh monks had fled during religious purges, and are published for the first time. These have been relatively unaltered by retelling over the centuries while others are attributed to bards who changed the story lines almost beyond recognition.

There was an abundance of other legends, too, many attributed to resourceful bards who, over the centuries, changed the story lines almost beyond recognition.

Some of the greatest legends, particularly those based upon proven historical facts, owe their survival to monks and others who fled to Yorkshire during religious purges. There they lay dormant and thus escaped the ravages of repetition.

Several of these wonder tales, dating from the 11th to 13th centuries, resurfaced in 1794 when they were recounted to a Yorkshire scholar in what is almost certainly their original form. Now they are retold once more, in print now for the first time. Included are:
The Legend of the Triple Sacrifice,
The Three Sisters of Ardudwy,
The Maidens of the Sea Marsh,
Roderick of Anglesea,
Mhaira and Madoc,
Owain Gwynedd's Silver Dagger,
The Lake of the Fair Ones,
The Dyn Hysbys,
The Legend of Beddgelert and
The Black Bull of Gwynedd.

During the second World War, while the author was seconded to the Indian Army, he became a regular contributor to The Illustrated Weekly, The Statesman, The Onlooker and The Times of India, winning the Literary Grand Prix in the Arts in Industry Exhibition. Throughout the campaign in Burma he commanded the Air Support Signals prior to serving in the 14th Army Staff, where he became interested in Indo-Celtic mythology.
After the war he returned to England to take up an Intelligence appointment on the Imperial General Staff. Later, in civilian life, he set up his own business which left little time for writing, until his retirement.  He is adamant that he will never undertake another challenge like Great Legends of Wales, which took five years to research.

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Representative Irish Tales

Representative Irish Tales

£8.99

With a foreword by Mary Helen Thuente

This anthology of Irish fiction edited by W.B. Yeats was first published in 1891, but despite its significance in his early career, was out of print for nearly eighty years. Representative Irish Tales is a fine selection of Irish fiction – as representative of Yeats himself as it is of Irish novelists. His introductory commentary and his editorial emendations provide an interesting perspective on an influential, but relatively unknown phase of his early work. Novelists represented are: Maria Edgeworth, John & Michael Banim, William Carleton, Samuel Lover, William Maginn, T. Crofton Croker, Gerald Griffin, Charles Lever, Charles Kickham, and Miss Rosa Mulholland.

Representative Irish Tales was first published in 1891 but was soon out of print - until the present edition in 1979. This printing (1991) marks the centenary of the work. Mary Helen Thuente provides a fascinating and useful foreword setting the tales in the context of Yeats's own writing.

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Vertue Rewarded, or The Irish Princess, ‘A New Novel’ (1693)

Vertue Rewarded, or The Irish Princess, ‘A New Novel’ (1693)

£8.99
21.6 x 13.8 cm.          Princess Grace Irish Library series (ISSN 0269-2619) volume 7

Published for the first, and (until now) only, time in 1693, this novel is set in Ireland immediately after the Battle of the Boyne, and describes the courtship of a young lady of Clonmel by a prince, who is on his way to take up a post in Limerick. The story is humorous and engaging. As the editor points out, its interest lies not only in it calling itself `A Novel', but that it may well have been known to Samuel Richardson, and influenced his Pamela (itself subtitled Virtue Rewarded), published fifty years later. This work can lay claim to being the first Irish novel ever published – certainly the earliest that is extant, and as such will be of interest to all students of literature in the English language.

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The Collector’s Bag

The Collector’s Bag

£15.99
(short stories)

A fascinating collection of stories based on the author's experiences as an Indian Civil Services Deputy Commissioner, or `Collector' in the Himalayan district of Garhwal, in which actual fact stands beside fiction, and where, if the story is not true, in whole or in part, it still gives a true insight into the life and mores of the people in that part of the subcontinent. Love, murder, rogues, humour, revenges, trial by ordeal, blood feuds, and Chinese-Tibetan plans for the invasion of India are featured, as well as an account of the author's meeting with Jawarhal Nehru.

The author has splendidly evoked a way of life of half a century ago, but much of it could still exist today: the world changes very little in the depths of the Indian hill country.

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Walter Pater, ‘Gaston de Latour’: The Revised Text

Walter Pater, ‘Gaston de Latour’: The Revised Text

£38.00
Author:
Series: 1880-1920 British Authors Series, Book 10
Genre: Fiction

Scarcely two years after Walter Pater's death, Macmillan & Company published Gaston de Latour; An Unfinished Romance. The author of works critical to the formation of the Transition and Modernist periods set his last novel in the turbulent years following the Reformation. Selected chapters first appeared serially in Macmillan's Magazine and Fortnightly Review, but the posthumous volume edited by Charles L. Shadwell, Pater's long-time friend, remains controversial. For a century readers have seen only a portion of what Pater wrote for Gaston de Latour. Shadwell withheld six manuscript chapters.

Pater's prominence and widening influence in late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century studies makes those unpublished chapters more intriguing than ever. Edited from the holographs and based on definitive material incorporating all known fragments, The Revised Text includes the crucial suppressed chapters. Professor Gerald Monsman's edition, meticulously edited and researched, is surely closer to Pater's own latest version. This comprehensive Gaston de Latour offers what many will see as a work closer to Pater's intention than the book Macmillan printed in 1896.

The Revised Text is notable in other ways, Pater's study of eroticism in his portrait of Queen Marguerite is a significant contribution to gender studies in the late-Victorian period. The Pater of the 1890s is revealed here too. As Monsman says, the “later Pater is in many ways the most interesting of all the successive Paters – certainly wearier, but also more candid, consummately polished artistically, self-consciously aware of a dawning modernism."

Gerald Monsman (University of Arizona) has worked for nearly a decade to bring this authoritative edition to print. His contributions to the field are well known: Pater’s Portraits (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1967), Walter Pater (G. K. Hall, 1977), Walter Pater’s Art of Autobiography (Yale University Press, 1980). Gaston de Latour: The Revised Text is a significant achievement. Scholars and students will find Monsman's Introduction, Explanatory Notes, Diplomatic Transcriptions, Emendations and Variants invaluable.

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Sleep

Sleep

£9.99
Author:
Genre: Fiction
Tag: Sleep

“My problem, my central problem, is I can’t sleep. . .”

By turns comic and poignant, brutal and beautiful, Sleep follows an insomniac’s long journey to the light through a night of tormenting memories and lucid drunken speculation. A sequence of bizarre encounters with other lonely and despicable denizens of the night leads him to recover some meaning to his life: release from his dead mother’s incapacity for love, his yearning for ‘the first whore’, for ‘the unknown house’, for sleep. . .

Michele Spina was born in Messina (Sicily) in 1923.  Writer, thinker and teacher, a man of vivid and inspiring intellect he lived almost thirty years in England, in willing exile from his loved and hated Italy (Brobdingnag or the Land of the Houyhnhnms’). His first book to appear in English was West of the Moon (Peter Owen, 1994)  Night and Other Short Stories (Colin Smythe) appeared in 1998.  Sleep, his finest and most personal work, was completed in London in 1990, shortly before his death.

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Lady Gregory’s Early Irish Writings 1883-1893

Lady Gregory’s Early Irish Writings 1883-1893

General Editors of the Coole Edition: T.R.Henn CBE and Colin Smythe

Edited and Introduced by James Pethica

23.4 x 15.5 cm. viii, 248 pp. illus.

This sixteenth volume of the Coole Edition of Lady Gregory's Writings contains her early published and unpublished fiction, the two versions of 'An Emigrant's Notebook' (1883), the three Angus Grey stories, 'A Philanthropist', 'A Gentleman' and 'Peeler Astore' (1890-91) and her 1893 'A Phantom's Pilgrimage, or Home Ruin'. This collection is preceded by Sir William Gregory's prescient and virtually unknown privately printed 1881 pamphlet on the Land League, which greatly influenced Lady Gregory's thought and writings. Added as Appendices are her poems 'Alas, a woman may not love' (1886). her 'prison' poems sent to Wilfrid Scawen Blunt (1888) and 'The Eviction' (1888).

James Pethica has provided an Introduction, Acknowledgements, A Note on Editorial Principles, and A Note on Archival Materials and Critical Work on Lady Gregory's Early Writings. More info →

Night, and Other Short Stories

Night, and Other Short Stories

£8.95
ISBN 978-0-86140-393-6

NIGHT is a collection of stories written between 1946 and 1990 about characters who live in small towns and communities, in different periods before our post-industrial era. All of them have to face crises of values not dissimilar in nature to the crises in our own society, which is indifferent to everything that is unique and alive. As a result they are pushed to the edges of their society or outside it, in a world that is very bleak indeed. This is the world of these dark stories.

The author relentlessly forces the reader to face reality, and to become aware of the limits of our ability to illuminate and control its pitiless crudity. The stoical, unflinching attitude in the voice of the narrator and his ferocious black humour cast away any illusion that the main purpose of literature is to be consoling or entertaining.

Night has an Introduction by Professor Giuseppe Serpillo of Sassari University, Italy, and a Postface by Giovanna Aquilecchia, Emeritus Professor of Italian Literature, University of London. Michele Spina (1923-1990) published fiction and essays on aesthetics in Italian, English and American journals. Born in Messina, he settled in England where he lectured in Art History and Theories of Art at Sunderland and Leeds Polytechnics. His Passo Doppio was published in 1981, and Ann Colcord’s English translation of his A Occidente della Luna: West of the Moon was published by Peter Owen in 1994, and shortlisted for the Florio Prize in 1997.

210pp.  

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