The Prose of J. M. Synge

The Prose of J. M. Synge

£8.99
Edited by Alan Price

paperback 21.4 cm.

J.M.Synge died in 1909 and The Works of John M. Synge were published in four volumes by Maunsel & Co., Dublin, in 1910. Since that time, with the exception of a few minor verses and one or two fragments of prose, the canon of his work has remained unaltered. Nevertheless, much unpublished material exists, for the most part of great interest and significance for the understanding of Synge's methods of work and development. This material, including early drafts of the plays, notebooks, poems, and fragments of poetic drama, has now been thoroughly explored in order to create this definitive edition, first published by Oxford University Press 1962-68, which not only collects together all that is of significance in his printed and in his unprinted work, but also, by a careful use of worksheets and early drafts, indicates much of the process of creation which occurred before the production of the printed page. The Collected Works is in four volumes, under the general editorship of the late Professor Robin Skelton, of the University of Victoria, British Columbia, who began the series with his edition of the poems and translations.

The second volume, edited by the late Dr Alan Price, of The Queen's University, Belfast, author of Synge and Anglo-Irish Drama, assembles all Synge's prose writings of any merit or interest. Over half of it consists of a reprint of The Aran Islands, and In Wicklow, West Kerry and Connemara, checked and supplemented where necessary by collation with Synge's own manuscripts and proofs. About a quarter consists of articles and reviews not previously collected, and the rest, including most of Part One, was never published before. Thus the prose of Synge can here be seen as a whole and should lead to a deeper understanding of both the writer and the Anglo-Irish literary revival. Thirty-five drawings by Jack B. Yeats are included.

These volumes were published in 1982 by arrangement with Oxford University Press.

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W.B.Yeats

W.B.Yeats

£4.99
19.0 x 13.0 cm.    viii, 151 pp.  [1983]     1990

W.B.Yeats (1865-1939) published his first volume of poetry in 1889. Deeply influenced by Spiritualism and Celtic mythology, he was a crucial figure in the Irish cultural revival of the 1890s. Under the influence of Maud Gonne he became involved in nationalist politics, but the Philistinism of the emerging Ireland repelled him, and he gradually drew back from public affairs. He had been a co-founder, with J.M.Synge and Lady Gregory, of the Abbey Theatre in 1904, and remained a director until the end of his life. His increasingly sceptical and pessimistic views on Ireland were temporarily reversed by the 1916 Rising. Out of the confusion and tensions of the following decade his greatest poetry developed: almost uniquely among major poets, his outstanding work was written in the second half of his life. In 1917 he had married George Hyde-Lees; they had two children. He died in the South of France, and in 1948 his body was brought back to Ireland and re-interred in Drumcliffe Churchyard, Co.Sligo.

This is a revised and enlarged edition of the work first published in 1983. On its first appearance it received exceptional reviews:

'Perceptive, honest and stimulating, subtly educating the uninformed reader in the best ways to approach a study of Yeats's verse, plays and letters.' Richard Allen Cave in British Book News

'A remarkable achievement. He has succeeded in presenting a rational, sensitive account of the life of Ireland's most famous poet....Well worth reading by the scholar and the general reader.' Ireland of the Welcomes

'A tour de force. Lucid and incisive, it gives us a convincing picture of Yeats's life in all its complexities, and it does so with insight and sympathy.' A. Norman Jeffares in The Yorkshire Post

`A remarkable synthesis of a huge topic, written with enthusiasm and flair and ending with a splendid essay on the poet's "close companions", his great capacity for friendship and for converting the experience into poetry.' Thomas Kilroy in The Irish Times

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Kahlil Gibran of Lebanon: A Re-evaluation of the Life and Works of the Author of ‘The Prophet’

Kahlil Gibran of Lebanon: A Re-evaluation of the Life and Works of the Author of ‘The Prophet’

£9.95
ISBN: 978-0-86140-279-3
21.6 x 13.8 cm.   

Kahlil Gibran of Lebanon is a guide for all those interested in the life and work of Kahlil Gibran who want further information, be they general readers or scholars.

It explains the fascinating world of the author of The Prophet which is one of the most celebrated works of the twentieth century. Modelled on Gibran’s own writings, simple and concise in presentation, the first half of this work is devoted to significant events in Gibran’s life. It provides the reader with the necessary back ground to his writing and painting, with particular reference to the individuals and and works that have been major influences. These are further explored in the second half, which is a critical study of Gibran’s work and contribution to the literature of the world.

Suheil died in September 2015. Obituaries can be found at http://ysnews.com/news/2015/09/suheil-badi-bushrui and at http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/obituaries/bs-md-ob-suheil-bushrui-20150927-story.html, https://arabhyphen.wordpress.com/2015/09/10/suheil-badi-bushrui-passes-away-1929-2015/  and elsewhere.

CONTENTS
Introduction
PART 1, HIS LIFE:  Family background and early years - Kahlil Gibran and Mary Haskell - Early career in Boston, Paris and New York - Maturity - Last years.
PART 2, HIS WORK: Early Arabic writings - Influences and parallels in the mature works - Mature works up to The Prophet - The Prophet ­- Last works.
Notes.
Bibliography

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The Rise of the Realists, 1910-1915

The Rise of the Realists, 1910-1915

£30.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm. Volume IV of The Modern Irish Drama series

The Rise of the Realists describes and documents Irish theatrical activity in the years of 1911 through 1915. In 1911, Synge’s last drama, the poetic Deirdre of the Sorrows, was produced, but a new group of realistic writers was emerging who were to shape the drama of the future – among them, St. John Ervine, Lennox Robinson and T. C. Murray.

These years also saw the Abbey Theatre touring three times to America, and being greeted by a riot in New York and by the arrest of the players in Philadelphia. Meanwhile, at home in Ireland, in Westport, George A. Birmingham’s General John Regan was greeted by a riot much more ferocious than that over Synge’s Playboy.

In Cork a new theatre group, the Cork Dramatic Society, produced the first work of Daniel Corkery, Terence MacSwiney, J. Bernard MacCarthy, Robinson, Murray and others. In Dublin, the Theatre of Ireland was superseded by the Irish Theatre in Hardwicke Street, which produced Edward Martyn, Thomas and John MacDonagh, Eimar O’Duffy and many continental plays, thereby paving the way for the Dublin Drama League and ultimately for the lasting work of the Gate Theatre.

For the first time, these neglected years of the modern Irish drama are thoroughly investigated.

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No Faith Required

No Faith Required

£5.00
ISBN: 978-82-90601-09-1
20.8 x  13.8 cm.     80 pp.     1995

This is a book about Healing. Not ‘Faith Healing’, as Matthew refuses to call it that. As he writes, ‘The idea that healing only works if you believe in it is simply not true! Healing can work on a sceptical person yet sometimes fail to help a believer. Healing also works in test-tubes in laboratories, as well as on animals and brain-damaged children. It cannot be said that these results are brought about by psychological factors, faith or placebo. There is no faith required.’

Contents: Introduction – Healing in the Laboratory – The Healing Experience – Healing Ourselves.
We distribute this book in Britain for Eikstein Publishers, of Øyslebø, Norway.
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Kinvara, A Seaport Town on Galway Bay

Kinvara, A Seaport Town on Galway Bay

£9.95
ISBN: 978-1-873821-07-7
18.5 x 23.5 cm,  120 pp.        94 b&w photographs    

A record, in image and word, of a coastal community's social and economic life, its traditions and the changes it has experienced since the late 19th century. The volume includes photographs taken between the 1890s and the 1960s which offer glimpses into an era when Kinvara was a busy port and market town, yet working and living at a slower pace – that of horse carts, sailing boats and manual labour. The explanatory captions which accompany the photographs contain details on folklore, traditions and local history. Quotes and anecdotes capture the wit and humour of the Kinvara people. The book's introduction places the town's development in a wider historical context.

'This book is first rate and recommended to all, even those who have never heard of Kinvara. A unique selection of historical photographs and a splendid compilation of locally sourced information. The photographs, spanning the period 1880 to 1960, reflect the lives of Kinvara's people before huge social and economic changes produced different moulds, imported patterns, new shadows for the same substance. This is a moving book.'  Connacht Tribune

This book is full of information covered by the Kinvara Guide & Map.  To go directly for information on the Kinvara Map Click Here

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George Otto Simms, A Biography

George Otto Simms, A Biography

£20.00
In this highly acclaimed biography, Lesley Whiteside traces the events and influences which shaped George Otto Simms's life, from his boyhood in Co. Donegal, through his education and early ministry in Ireland to his years as Bishop of Cork, Archbishop of Dublin, and finally Archbishop of Armagh. The author explores the academic and ecclesiastical aspects of his life, while much of the book is concerned with the sometimes difficult years in Dublin and Armagh, with ecumenical progress and the tragedy of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. `This is a well deserved biography and it has proved worthy of its subject' Church Times More info →
Georgian Dublin

Georgian Dublin

£4.99
Twenty-five Views in Colour Aquatint
ISBN: 978-0-85105-425-4

10.7 x 14.8 cm landscape    xi, [53] pp.     25 full colour prints

Georgian Dublin is a pocket-sized edition of Malton's superb colour aquatints which show Dublin city in its finest age – the period in which the present layout of the city emerged and during which many of its classical buildings were erected. These lively and colourful prints open a window to the past and reveal scene after scene which, with one exception, can still be visited today. The views range from the great courtyard of Dublin Castle, past Gandon's riverfront masterpieces, the Custom House and the Four Courts, to the simple street scene at Capel Street bridge, peopled with the Dubliners of two centuries ago.

Malton's work originally appeared in the final decade of the eighteenth century and was highly praised on publication. He wrote in his announcement of the work that he was 'struck with admiration at the beauty of the capital of Ireland and was anxious to make a display of it to the world'.

'the most splendid illustrated book on Dublin.'
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All Cultivated People. A History of the United Arts Club, Dublin

All Cultivated People. A History of the United Arts Club, Dublin

£28.00
ISBN: 978-0-86140-266-3
21.6 x 13.8 cm.   xii, 296 pp. + 16pp. with 33 illus. 

Founded in 1907, the history of the Club reflects the creative life of the city and nation, with a membership of many of the leading literary and artistic figures of the last eighty years. Patricia Boylan chronicles the ups and downs it suffered, how it was affected by historical events, and describes the often colourful lives of its more famous members.

Contents: Genesis – The People and the Place – Celebrated Names – Limited Company – An Auspicious Year – Minute by Minute – A Shameful Year: 1913 – Sad Goodbyes – The Club in Wartime: 1914-1915 – Rebellions: 1916 – The Real Irish? 1916-1918 – Business as Usual: 1919-1920 – A Neutral Zone: 1921-1922 – Carrying On: 1923-1924 – Coming and Going: 1925-1929 – Betty Bolts – A Cold Eye: 1933-1939 – The End of an Era – Changing Times – Doldrums – The Latest Chapter

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Horace Plunkett: Co-operation and Politics, An Irish Biography

Horace Plunkett: Co-operation and Politics, An Irish Biography

£22.00

Horace Plunkett is remembered for his efforts to transform Irish agricultural practice, through the Co-operative Movement which he founded in 1889, and its administration via the Department of Agriculture, which he established ten years later.

From a protestant ascendancy background, Plunkett was one of those ‘fenian unionists' who were always able to see both sides of the Irish Question, and whose reforming zeal, and frank expression of opinion, during the period in which Ireland moved from benevolent Tory rule by Westminster, to independence for the south and partition of the island, brought him into conflict with all shades of political opinion.

This biography traces the development and interplay of his social and political philosophies, establishing Plunkett as the pioneer of modernisation of Ireland's principal industry, and as a political figure whose ideals and experience are of abiding interest.

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W.J.Turner, Poet and Music Critic

W.J.Turner, Poet and Music Critic

£30.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.        xx,  257 pp.  index      1990

Born in Melbourne, Australia, in October 1884, W.J.Turner left his home city in March 1907, determined to create a career for himself as a writer in London. By 1946, when he died, he had contributed to the literary and musical life of England in ways that establish him as a unique and fascinating figure. A man of independent mind and provocative originality, he was perhaps the most outspoken critic of his time and, in Arnold Bennett's judgement, the only one of his generation whom it was a `pleasure to read for the sake of reading', as well as being a poet whose `majestic song' left Yeats, in his own words, `lost in admiration and astonishment'.

Wayne McKenna's work provides an overview of Turner's life and work, discussing his plays, novels, short stories, poetry drama criticism and literary editing, and well as commenting on the more important literary friend ships in his life, such as those with Yeats, Siegfried Sassoon, and Lady Ottoline Morrell.

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The House of Peter: The History of the Vatican

The House of Peter: The History of the Vatican

£12.95
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     viii, 145 pp.   + 8pp. illus   
ISBN: 978-0-905715-33-9

The author of this book has succeeded where many have failed: he has written the history of the Vatican, the House of Peter, from the days the first Christian martyrs were executed on the Vatican Hill, to the present, and he presents us with an account the reader will find difficult to put down.

The book’s outstanding quality is that it complements and enhances the splendid and sumptuous impression the Vatican gives today with St Peter’s Basilica in its centre and surrounded on one side by Bernini’s colonnades, and on the others by the many palaces which serve as residences and museums.

Reading this book we see far beyond the familiar façade of the Vatican: there is nothing boring about this kind of history; for example, the author’s description of the erection of the obelisk in St Peter’s Square makes the reader view that familiar landmark with a far greater understanding of the tremendous feat that was accomplished. Here, and elsewhere, the author’s narrative is complemented by largely unknown illustrations from the Vatican Archives.

Count Antonio Alberti-Poja was ideally placed to write on the subject: he was one of the consultori (member of the Council of State) of the Vatican City State, and Head of the Administrative Council of Peregrinato ad Petri Sedem for foreign visitors to the See of St Peter.

The author’s deep commitment to, and care for, the millions of visitors who come to the Vatican provided the motive, and his position in the government of the Vatican City State gave him the opportunity for his research, but neither would have guaranteed such an absorbing narrative.

To those who have visited the Vatican in the past,, it will bring back memories and probably change many concepts formed by that overpowering edifice that greets today’s visitors and pilgrims. After reading The House of Peter, those who come to the Vatican – for the first time or as seasoned visitors – will see the Holy City in a new light, looking beyond the splendid façade and the other works created by man for the greater glory of God, back through time to that first, small memorial that marked the grave of the rock of the Church, the Apostle Peter.

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The Playwright & the Pirate. Bernard Shaw & Frank Harris: A Correspondence

The Playwright & the Pirate. Bernard Shaw & Frank Harris: A Correspondence

£35.00
Edited and with an introduction by Stanley Weintraub

A more incongruous friendship than the one reflected in this correspondence is hard to imagine. Shaw is now remembered as the loading playwright of his time, and one of era's most memorable wits; Harris has become notorious for his near-pornographic My Life and Loves, and for a humourless (and disintegrating) sense of self-importance. At one time, Harris had been one of the later nineteenth century's most visible literary figures, a friend of such dissimilar people as Lord Randolph Churchill and Oscar Wilde, an editor of the London Evening News at 29, then editor of the Fortnightly Review and the Saturday Review, whose theatre critic Shaw became. Never quite respectable, Harris had been tolerated — even courted — as an amiable vulgarian when he was a rising star. However, his booming voice and four-letter language, his inability to look like anything other than an Albanian highwayman even when dressed in tails, his gluttonous gormandising and insatiable womanising, quickly made him a pariah in Edwardian circles as his career began to slip and he began to snatch at shady quick-money opportunities.

While Harris's career was hitting bottom, and doing it often, Shaw's reputation as playwright and publicist was growing. However strained Shaw's loyalties to his former editor became, they persisted, and both the strains and loyalties emerge in a generation of their correspondence. The 121 letters in this volume, spanning more than 35 years, reveal much of the private men and become in effect a pair of parallel autobiographies. Letters previously published — such as Shaw's famous remembrance to Harris of Oscar Wilde and his hilarious spoof-Harrisian biography of himself—are now published for the first time in accurate and complete texts, as is Shaw's memorable letter about his sex-life, which he insisted Harris expurgate when, in Harris's last, money-short years, he seized at a publisher's advance to write his former employee's biography. In the end Shaw completed it, in his own fashion, for Harris's widow.

Through these pages emerge the literary and political life of Edwardian and Georgian England, and wartime America, via Shaw's wit and ebullience and Harris's pomposity and paranoia. And in the relationship of the correspondents is a drama of two personalities whom Harris saw as having shared a heyday before one fell upon bad luck. To Harris it was a melodrama, to Shaw a tragicomedy.

Stanley Weintraub,was Research Professor and Director of the Institute for the Arts and Humanistic Studies at The Pennsylvania State University. Apart from numerous other books, he is author or editor of more than a dozen books on Shaw, including Private Shaw and Public Shaw, Journey to Heartbreak, and The Portable Bernard Shaw. He is also editor of SHAW, The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies, successor to The Shaw Review. More info →

Shaw, Lady Gregory, & the Abbey: A Correspondence and a Record

Shaw, Lady Gregory, & the Abbey: A Correspondence and a Record

£25.00
22.8 x 15.0 cm.  

Bernard Shaw, who made his international reputation as a playwright in London, and Augusta Gregory, founder-director of the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, are generally considered as belonging to different theatrical traditions. But in 1909, when the Abbey produced The Shewing-up of Blanco Posnet, which had been banned in England, there began a close involvement of Shaw with Irish theatre and a warm personal friendship with Lady Gregory.

The complete surviving correspondence between the two, published for the first time, reveals their developing relationship: the battle with Dublin Castle over Blanco, Shaw’s support for Lady Gregory in the rows over Synge’s Playboy in America; the controversy with military authorities over O’Flaherty V.C., written for the Abbey in 1915; the lively exchange of views on Ireland, politics, the Hugh Lane pictures, the schooling of the Gregory grand­children; which ended only with Lady Gregory’s death in 1932.

Drawing upon letters to and from other corre­spondents, diaries and engagement books, private memoranda, newspaper reports, and press releases, the editors have enlarged the correspondence into a comprehensive record of Shaw’s important and previously unrecognised contribution to the Irish theatre. Shaw and Lady Gregory’s crisp, witty and informal letters, in the context of their joint commitment to the Abbey, make the book rewarding reading for all those with an interest in the theatre.

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Florence Farr, Bernard Shaw’s ‘New Woman’

Florence Farr, Bernard Shaw’s ‘New Woman’

£25.00
ISBN 978-0-901072-15-3

Florence Farr: Bernard Shaw's 'New Woman' is the first biography of an unjustly neglected figure. Florence Farr was a member of the occult Order of the Golden Dawn, and was closely connected with Bernard Shaw and W.B.Yeats; to the first she was a mistress and companion, in the second it was probably a spiritual relationship only. For years the unrevealed facts of her life have in part caused a void in both their biographies. She sought spiritual as well as physical independence, and she achieved intellectual recognition when it was unfashionable for women to do so.

She was a mystic, and author, and a valiant although not superior actress in the years when it was not absolutely necessary to be the prototype of Ibsen's new woman. It is not so much her sentiments for Yeats and Shaw that appeal to us now, years after their deaths, but theirs for Florence Farr.

This timely book fills a gap in the literary history of the turn of the century, and the author has been fortunate in being able to use hitherto unpublished correspondence and manuscripts by her subject.

Contents

1. William Farr, 1807-1883
2. The Beginning of a New Woman: Queen's College and Edward Emery
3. Hammersmith and Bedford Park, 1889-1890
4. Bernard Shaw and Florence Farr: The New Drama, 1891-1897
5. The Golden Dawn and Other Mysteries, 1890-1904
6. The Music of Speech, 1890-1906
7. Florence and John Quinn, 1907
8. The New Woman as Journalist, 1907-1908
9. 'Second always , . . yet this is you', 1907-1912
10. Ceylon, 1912-1917
Index

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Medieval and Modern Ireland

Medieval and Modern Ireland

£25.00
ISBN 978-0-86140-289-2

All the papers in Medieval and Modern Ireland were presented at the eighteenth annual international conference of the Canadian Association for Irish Studies, held at Calgary, Alberta, in February 1985. The conference theme, Medieval and Modern Ireland, was chosen by the organising committee for its intrinsic merits, and as a reasonable extension of the theme of the previous conference which focused on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Readers of this volume will be struck by the pervasiveness of the connections between the medieval and the modern in Ireland and the Irish, artists in particular, and realise why James Joyce could hardly avoid linking the modern Irish artist with the medieval Irish monk, as he does in the bitter musings of Stephen Dedalus, who walks alone into eternity along Sandymount Strand: ‘You were going to do wonders, what? Missionary to Europe after fiery Columbanus.’

The contributors are Hallvard Dahlie, Ann Dooley, John Wilson Foster, Brian John, Toni O’Brien Johnson, Heinz Kosok, F. X. Martin O.S.A., and Wolfgang Zach.

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Mrs S.C. Hall: A Literary Biography

Mrs S.C. Hall: A Literary Biography

£36.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.   xii, 260 pp.  1997   Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 50

In 1829 Mrs S.C.Hall, an Irishwoman living in England, published a book of sketches set mainly in her native Wexford. Sketches of Irish Life and Character was an immediate success both with literary critics and the general public. A second series of Sketches appeared in 1831 and established Mrs Hall's reputation in  England as an interpreter of Irish character. Her later works on Ireland – Lights and Shadows of Irish Life (1838), Stories of the Irish Peasantry (1840) and The Whiteboy (1845) – reinforced this view, and were very popular with her English and Scottish readers. She collaborated with her husband, the journalist Samuel Carter Hall, in the writing of a three-volume guide to Ireland, Halls' Ireland, its Scenery, Character, etc. (1841-43), and this too was accepted as an informed description of Irish life and character.

In fact, Mrs Hall wrote as an observer imbued with colonial attitudes who believed in the superiority of everything English. Out of a genuine love for Ireland, however, she wished to make the country better known and understood in England, and she hoped through her writings to cure the Irish people of their faults. What makes her work interesting is the fact that it displays a tolerance and a lack of bigotry that was unusual for its time, and that she is openly critical (especially in her novel The Whiteboy) of government mismanagement and misrule.

CONTENTS
1. Ireland – 'The Great Mart of Fiction'; 2. Mrs Hall – Marriage and Markets; 3. Teaching – The Taste of the Times; 4. Sketches of Irish Life – The Voice of the Colonist; 5. Lights and Shadows – a melancholy book; 6. Stories of the Irish Peasantry – Correcting the 'evil habits of poor Pat'; 7. Halls' Ireland – 'Guidance for those who design to visit Ireland; 8. The Whiteboy –' 'A truly national novel'; 9. Three novelists with a common cause; 10. Assessments – then and now; Index.

Maureen Keane was educated at Dominican College, Eccles Street, Dublin, and University College, Dublin. After graduating with an M.A. she worked for a time as a teacher and then took up a career in journalism, first as a freelance and then as an editor. Returning to academic life, she received her Ph.D. from Maynooth College for a study of didacticism in the works of William Carleton, Mrs S.C.Hall and Charles Lever. This is her first book.

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The Insurrection in Dublin

The Insurrection in Dublin

£6.99
With sepia reproductions of 24 contemporary postcards of scenes from the Rising.

The Insurrection in Dublin was first published in October 1916, barely six months after the Irish Volunteers’ Easter Rising took place. The text was never revised so that it has retained the sense of immediacy that makes it one of the classic works of the period.

James Stephens is best known as the author of The Crock of Gold and The Demi Gods as well as for his poetry, but as AE wrote in his review of this work: ‘he has the most vivid senses of any Irishman now writing. He kept a journal day by day, writing down what saw with those keen eyes of his. They are the eyes of the poet and storyteller interested a thousand times more in the character of life, in studying behaviour under abnormal circumstances, than in any other aspects of the rising.’ These qualities have kept this book recurrently in print.

John A. Murphy, who was Professor of Irish History at University College Cork, NUI, has contributed an Introduction and Afterword which set the Rising in its historial context, and assess the impact that it had on Ireland at the time and the subsequent events that led up to the foundation of the Irish Free State.

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The Art of the Amateur 1916-1920

The Art of the Amateur 1916-1920

£30.00
ISBN: 978-0-85105-372-1
21.6 x 13.8 cm   368 pp.  1984    Volume 5 of  The Modern Irish Drama, a documentary history

The Art of the Amateur, the fifth volume in the documentary history, The Modern Irish Drama, describes and documents the Irish theatre from 1916-1920, some of the most turbulent years of the emerging nation. Against the background of the Easter Rising in Dublin and its violent aftermath, and of the Great War in Europe, the authors chart how the Irish theatre coped with, mirrored, and curiously, often ignored the trauma of the times.

As the authors of The Art of the Amateur note, the theatre, especially the theatre as entertainment, flourishes in times of public horror. With the deaths of Pearse, MacDonagh, MacSwiney and Sean Connolly, the Abbey player, there was more than enough horror. If few masterpieces immediately emerged, the stage in the period covered in this volume, both public and private, was being set for the emergence of the plays of Sean O’Casey and Denis Johnston.

The Modern Irish Drama, of which The Art of the Amateur is the fifth volume, is a documentary history with transcriptions of contemporary reviews and full cast lists. As The Irish Press commented, ‘Professor Hogan and his distinguished collaborators . . . have produced a rich, fascinating and, to the drama-junkie, indispensable book on a generally neglected period of Irish theatrical history.’

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Robert Gregory 1881-1918

Robert Gregory 1881-1918

£6.99

A Centenary Tribute, with a foreword by his children

'In the centenary clamour of 1982 and the celebrations and reconsiderations of O Conaire, Joyce, Stephens and Woolf, Colin Smythe's slim Robert Gregory . . . might easily have been overlooked. It appears, however, that the editor of Books Ireland found it beguiling – and so does this reviewer. For one thing, although it is a centenary tribute, Robert Gregory exudes grace and charm; it lends itself to appreciation rather than to contentiousness, and it convinces the reader, utterly, that Gregory, if not our 'Sidney and our perfect man', was a Renaissance figure whose early death might have been an illustration for the maxim that whom the gods love die young. . . .

'[It] is not of interest merely because of Gregory's connections with literary and artistic life, fascinating as they are. It is a montage of poetry, reminiscences and many illustrations and photographs which, though they underline the connections, ultimately serve to illuminate the man. This book is not – contrary to what the reader might think at first glance – in the least ephemeral. One wants to leaf through it again and again, so strong, and yet so evocative, is the sense of Gregory which it imparts.' Janet Madden-Simpson, in Books Ireland

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