Beckett and Proust

Beckett and Proust

£35.00

Ever since the first appearance of Proust in 1931, Samuel Beckett has responded extremely ambivalently, both praising and belittling his subject. Captivated by his occasionally contagious enthusiasm for it, Beckett's own critics have praised Proust as the ideal guide to both its subject and its author, creating the myth that their concerns are somehow one and the same.

Nicholas Zurbrugg's work – itself virtually a trilogy of critical studies – offers a timely antidote to this confusion. He begins by reassessing the Proustian vision before considering Beckett's Proust when he examines the evolution of this essay with particular reference to Beckett's own annotated copies of the work. Finally he reassesses Beckett's fictional vision, arguing that its peculiarly anti-Proustian character may be traced from his first, unpublished novel, Dream of Fair to Middling Women, to Company and his most recent writing of the 1980s.

I found [it] such compelling reading that once I had started I could not lay it down. . . . No-one can read this without learning much that is permanently useful not only about its central subjects, but also about lines of influence in modern literature, and about the nature of literary experiences. . . . I am sure I shall have cause to reread it many times.'   Professor S.S.Prawer

More info →
Assessing the 1984 ‘Ulysses’

Assessing the 1984 ‘Ulysses’

£30.00

Alongside Eliot's Waste Land and Ezra Pound's Cantos, Ulysses is unquestionably the most important literary text of this century. That is why it is both natural and necessary to pay more than the usual attention to the significant detail embedded in that monumental work.

Joyce demanded that Ulysses be published on his fortieth birthday, 2 February 1922. He forced the non-English-speaking printers in Dijon to work against next to impossible deadlines, and from almost unreadable manuscripts and proofs, so clotted were they with revisions. For this and other reasons, Joyce himself was acutely aware of the unusually large number of 'errors' in the body of the book, and said as much in his letters to friends. There 'errors' irritated him so much that he even issued a number of errata lists during his lifetime, but to no avail. All editions of Ulysses teemed with misprints and other 'errors': this is about the only statement on which there is genuine critical consensus.

In the late 1970s a comprehensive research project was mounted in Munich in systematically to deal with these 'errors' with the aid of a sophisticated computer program. The outcome was the 'error-free' edition of Ulysses published on Bloomsday 1984.

The sole purpose of the conference held in Monaco in 1985, bringing together some of the most outstanding experts of the Joycean text, was to scrutinise collectively the validity of the changes made by the Munich team.

Anthony Burgess points out in his Preface that in Ulysses as in Finnegans Wake, 'it is virtually impossible to divide substance from form... the characters are so embedded in their mode of presentation that it would be dangerous to release them from their verbal ambience'. It is precisely that point that makes this collection of papers an indispensable companion to the New Text of Ulysses as it has emerged from its 1984 facelift.

The outstanding Joyce scholars contributing to this work include Richard Ellmann, Clive Hart, Fritz Senn, David Hayman, and Richard Kain.

More info →

The Achievement of Brian Friel

The Achievement of Brian Friel

£30.00

21.6 x 13.8 cm.    xx, 267 pp.   1883    Ulster Editions and Monoographs Series (ISSN 0954-3392) volume 4

The reception of Brian Friel's recent Dancing at Lughnasa confirmed his status as Ireland's leading dramatist. The body of work that he produced is outstanding in its breadth of sympathy and interest, its dramaturgical invention and its wide cultural and intellectual purview. At one level, it may be seen as a continuous examination of Irish culture and politics, committed and analytical, but not sectionally propagandist.

His outlook in his drama, however, was not amenable to simplistic categorization, political or otherwise. As this volume demonstrates, linguistically, allusively, and in terms of its broad transcultural analogising, he work ranges widely. He utilised ideas and terminologies drawn from various cultural sources and academic disciplines in a way that exemplified his central, insistent concern with the phenomenon of language and its implications. As an Irish dramatist, however, he made Irish social, political and, notably, family life his focus and built upon a recognised tradition of twentieth century Irish play-writing.

This book addresses the variety and complexity of Friel's drama by bringing to bear a range of academic and other professional and creative approaches in order to highlight particular aspects of his work and thought. Hence, contributors include a playwright, poet, theatre-producer, historian and various specialists in relevant literatures. In this way, the book suggests the intellectual richness, humanity, and protean skill and invention of the work. Among the contributors are John Cronin, Neil Corcoran, Desmond Maxwell, Christopher Murray, Thomas Kilroy, Seamus Deane, Robert Welch, Sean Connolly, Joe Dowling, Terence Brown, Fintan O'Toole and Seamus Heaney.

More info →
Yeats and AE: ‘The antagonism that unites dear friends’

Yeats and AE: ‘The antagonism that unites dear friends’

£33.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.    xiv, 291 pp. + 16 pp. with 33 illus.  

During his life, W.B.Yeats formed only a few literary friendships from which he received as much as he gave. One of the foremost was his association with George William Russell. ‘A.E. was my oldest friend’ he confided to an admirer on Russell’s death in 1935. ‘We began our work together.’

This engaging, carefully researched book charts the history and evaluates the significance of the first twenty-three years of that work. It begins with the early months of 1884 when Yeats and Russell first met at the Arts Schools in Kildare Street, Dublin, and ends with their divisive quarrels in 1907 about the policies of the Abbey Theatre.

Taking as its focal point Yeats’s summary of the association – ‘between us as always there existed that antagonism that unites dear friends’ – the book sensitively gauges the pressures that each man exerted on the other. It also examines the way these pressures both affected their respective imaginative developments and shaped the course of the literary movement.

'What Kuch sets out to do, he does scrupulously and with such attention to detail, minutiae even, that his scholarly apparatus takes up nearly a quarter of the book. It is indeed "carefully researched".' Derek Mahon in The Irish Times

More info →

Parameters of Irish Literature In English

Parameters of Irish Literature In English

£5.99
ISBN: 978-0-86140-246-5
21.0 x 15.0 cm. 44 pp. 1986 Princess Grace Irish Library Lectures series (ISSN 0950-5121) volume 1

In this lecture, given at the Princess Grace Irish Library on 25 April 1986, Professor Jeffares surveys creative writing in Ireland from the earliest times to its flowering in the last centuries.

The list of great Irish writers is truly remarkable: not only does it include 20th century figures such as Beckett, Joyce, Moore, O'Casey, Shaw, Synge and Yeats, but equally famous names from the 19th century and earlier, including the Banims, Boucicault, Carleton, Congreve, Edgeworth, Farquhar, Le Fanu, Lever, Lover, Sheridan, Swift, Wilde, and many more. There are countless others who have suffered from the vagaries of fashion and the lack of modern critical appreciation.

Irish authors have had a very wide readership, not only in Ireland and Britain, but throughout the English-speaking world, particularly in the United States of America, where they have always been extremely popular.

Professor Jeffares also provides a list of writers of Irish literature in English, as well as important writers in the Irish language.

More info →
George Moore in Perspective

George Moore in Perspective

£30.00

21.6 x 13.8 cm   174 pp.  1983       Irish literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 16

George Moore was considered during his lifetime to have been one of the supreme masters of prose style in the early years of the 20th century, and he was renowned for rewriting his books as his style developed. His many famous works include Hail and Farewell!, The Lake, A Drama in Muslin (rewritten as Muslin), Evelyn Innes, Esther Waters, The Brook Kerith and A Story Teller's Holiday, though many would immediately call to mind others of his oeuvre.

Moore died in January 1933 and this collection was brought together to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of his death. The essays (in order of appearance in the book) are
'George Moore, a reappraisal' (Janet Egleson Dunleavy);
'Moore Hall, 1952' (Richard J.Byrne);
'George Moore's Paris' (Jane Crisler);
'George Moore's Dublin' (James Liddy);
'Private Moore, Public Moore' (Robert Stephen Becker);
'George Moore's Medievalism' (Gareth W. Dunleavy);
'The Moore-Joyce Nexus' (Patrick A.McCarthy);
  'George Moore and Samuel Beckett' (Melvin J. Friedman);
'Collecting Moore' (Edwin Gilcher).
To these are added a collection of 17 portraits, in life and caricature, of George Moore, and an appendix 'Some Bibliographical Notes' by Edwin Gilcher, in which he adds to the information he published in his 1970 Bibliography.

More info →
An International Companion to the Poems of W. B. Yeats

An International Companion to the Poems of W. B. Yeats

£25.00
ISBN: 978-0-86140-193-2
21.6 x 13.8 cm   255 pp.  1989

W.B.Yeats is one of the most important and widely-read poets of the twentieth century, occupying a central position in literature courses throughout the world. Yet he is often presented in critical works as a ‘difficult’ poet who can only be understood by reference to other writings that must be used as keys to unlock the mysteries of his work. It is the belief of the authors of this book that the poetry must be approached on its own terms, and its meanings established in as simple a way as possible before these texts can be enriched by knowledge of the biographical, historical, philosophical or aesthetic contexts.

This book is an essential companion to the poetry of Yeats for students in every country where his work is known. It sets out to meet the demands both of those whose first language is English, and of those for whom it is their second. Consequently the core of this volume is a detailed study of some ninety poems which cover all phases of Yeats’s poetic development. Each poem is provided with a summary, glossary and commentary, based on the primary meaning. The poems are also set in both the immediate context of the collections in which they were first published, and the wider context of the evolution of Yeats’s art and philosophy.

The Companion has a general commentary section dealing with Yeats’s style, his symbolism, his vision, the people and places that appear in his works, and the role of magic, myth, legend, history, civilization, nationalism and politics in the poems. There is also a useful list of recommended works, and basic texts.

More info →

‘Since O’Casey’ and other essays on Irish Drama

‘Since O’Casey’ and other essays on Irish Drama

£25.00

In this collection of lucid essays that cover the entire eighty years of modern Irish drama, Robert Hogan writes about the major Irish dramatists of the 20th century and their impact on audiences, and on other playwrights, as well as considering the works themselves. In them he uses a variety of critical techniques, ranging from biography to studies of influence, structure and dialogue, to history and anecdote, and the ill-treatment of several sacred cows.

In addition to essays on such giants as Synge, O'Casey, and Beckett, the book deals with more neglected figures such as W. J. Lawrence and the still insufficiently appreciated George Fitzmaurice and Denis Johnston. It also presents a full critical survey of the years 1963-83 in which exciting writers like Brian Friel, Hugh Leonard and John B. Keane made their mark. The author's style and varied ways of dealing with the subjects make this volume particularly enjoyable, as well as informative, reading.

CONTENTS
Preface
YEATS CREATES A CRITIC
THE INFLUENCE OF SYNGE
THERE IS REALISM AND REALISM
O'CASEY, THE STYLE AND THE ARTIST
O'CASEY, THE STYLE AND THE MAN
THE INFLUENCE OF O'CASEY
DENIS JOHNSTON'S HORSE LAUGH
TRYING TO LIKE BECKETT
SINCE O'CASEY
A Factual Appendix
A Critical Appendix, by W. J. Lawrence, containing his reviews of Birthright by T. C. Murray (1910), The Magic Glasses by George Fitzmaurice (1913), Shanwalla by Lady Gregory (1915), and Juno and the Paycock by Sean O'Casey (1924)
Notes
Index

More info →

Literature and the Art of Creation

Literature and the Art of Creation

£35.00
ISBN 978-0-86140-252-6

This volume of critical essays and of creative writings brings together work by distinguished authors in many fields in honour of Alexander Norman Jeffares: English literature, Irish and Anglo-Irish Literature and Commonwealth literature, all fields which gained his interest throughout his life and to which he has contributed much, both through the spoken and printed word – as can be’ seen from the bibliography of his writings at the end of this volume.

Scholarship and criticism are deployed by the essayists to show how literature, by virtue of its creativity, offers a human and vivid insight into the individual in his or her society.

Poets and imaginative writers of many traditions deepen and extend our understanding of the creative impulse and its immediacy through their own work.

More info →

Lady Gregory, Fifty Years After

Lady Gregory, Fifty Years After

£38.00

It is now over fifty years since the death of Augusta Gregory, who as a playwright, folklorist, essayist, poet, translator, editor, theatre administrator and nationalist, contributed so much and so uniquely to the realisation of modern Ireland. Yet soon after her death she seemed to be virtually forgotten, and the words on her gravestone – ‘she shall be remembered for ever’ – had a very hollow ring about them.

It has only been in the last twenty-five years that Lady Gregory’s reputation has turned round, beginning with Elizabeth Coxhead’s biography, and the subsequent appearance of the Coole Edition of her works. The publication of Mary Lou Kohfeldt's biography in 1985 and now the appearance of this volume – the first collection of essays to be devoted to her – must surely create a greater awareness of her importance as a cornerstone of the Irish Literary Revival.

Her books and plays, together with her work for the Abbey as manager, playwright, play-reader and fund-raiser, have had an influence on the literary life of Ireland in the first half of this century that has been greatly underestimated.

This collection opens with fragments of memory about Lady Gregory, and then brings together leading critics to write about various aspects of her life, her work, and her friendships with Yeats, W. S. Blunt, Sean O’Casey, John Quinn, and Douglas Hyde. There is also a checklist of her contributions to periodicals (over 180 items so far discovered), and an assessment of the work of her son, Robert Gregory.

Fragments of memory come from George Moore, The Sunday Herald (Boston), Signe Toksvig, Sean O’Casey, The Rt. Rev. Arnold Harvey, Anne Gregory, W. B. Yeats, Anne Yeats, Maire nic Shiubhlaigh, W. G. Fay, Brinsley MacNamara and Gabriel Fallon.

The contributors are Andrew E. Malone, Mary FitzGerald, Mary Lou Kohfeldt Stevenson, Brian Jenkins, James Pethica, Elizabeth Longford, Daniel J. Murphy, Gareth W. Dunleavy, Maureen Murphy, John Kelly, Richard Allen Cave, Ronald Ayling, Robert Welch, Bernard Shaw, Dan H. Laurence, Lorna D. Young, Ann Saddlemyer, Colin Smythe.

INTRODUCTION. Ann Saddlemyer and Colin Smythe
Acknowledgements
CHRONOLOGY. Colin Smythe
FRAGMENTS OF MEMORY
Pen Portraits: George Moore Sunday Herald (Boston) Signe Toksvig Sean O'Casey
The Chatelaine of Coole: The Rt. Rev. Arnold Harvey, Anne Gregory, W. B. Yeats, Anne Yeats, Sean O'Casey, W. B. Yeats
At the Abbey Theatre: Maire nic Shiubhlaigh W. G. Fay Brinsley MacNamara Gabriel Fallon
LADY GREGORY, 1852–1932. Andrew E. Malone
'PERFECTION OF THE LIFE': LADY GREGORY'S AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL WRITINGS. Mary FitzGerald
THE CLOUD OF WITNESSES. Mary Lou Kohfeldt Stevenson
THE MARRIAGE. Brian Jenkins
LADY GREGORY AND WILFRID SCAWEN BLUNT. Elizabeth Longford
'A WOMAN'S SONNETS'. Lady Gregory, with a Commentary by James Pethica
'DEAR JOHN QUINN''. Daniel J. Murphy
THE PATTERN OF THREE THREADS: THE HYDE-GREGORY FRIENDSHIP. Gareth W. Dunleavy
LADY GREGORY AND THE GAELIC LEAGUE. Maureen Murphy
LADY GREGORY AND SEAN O'CASEY: AN UNLIKELY FRIENDSHIP REVISITED. Ronald Ayling
'FRIENDSHIP IS ALL THE HOUSE I HAVE': LADY GREGORY AND W. B. YEATS. John Kelly
A LANGUAGE FOR HEALING. Robert Welch
NOTE ON LADY GREGORY'S PLAYS. Bernard Shaw, edited by Dan H. Laurence
FOUR FRENCH COMEDIES: LADY GREGORY'S TRANSLATIONS OF MOLIÈRE. Mary FitzGerald
IN RETROSPECT: LADY GREGORY'S PLAYS FIFTY YEARS LATER. Lorna D. Young
THE GLORY OF THE WORLD AND THE PEASANT MIRROR. Ann Saddlemyer
LADY GREGORY'S CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERIODICALS: A CHECKLIST. Colin Smythe
APPENDIX: ROBERT GREGORY: ARTIST AND STAGE DESIGNER. Richard Allen Cave
Notes
Notes on Contributors
Index

More info →

Selected Plays of T.C. Murray

Selected Plays of T.C. Murray

£8.95 pbk
Chosen and Introduced by Richard Allen Cave

The tenth volume of the Irish Drama Selections series (ISSN 0260-7962), General Editors: Joseph Ronsley and Ann Saddlemyer.

Hardback ISBN: 0-86140-142-5 / 978-0-86140-142-0 £30.00
Paperback ISBN: 0-86140-143-3 / 978-0-86140-143-7 £ 8.95

21.6 x 13.8 cm.    

Contains: Sovereign Love, Birthright, Maurice Harte, The Briery Gap, Autumn Fire, The Pipe in the Fields, the essay ‘George Shiels, Brinsley MacNamara, Etc.’, and the previously unpublished Illumination , bibliographical checklist.

The playwriting career of Thomas Cornelius Murray (1873-1959) started in 1909 with the production of his first play, Wheel of Fortune (which he revised in 1913 and renamed Sovereign Love), at the Cork Little Theatre, but it was his Birthright, produced at the Abbey Theatre in the following year that established him as a writer of stark and tragic realism. His most enduring plays were all written during the next two decades, but none of the plays written after 1930 can be compared for quality with his earlier work.

The present selection contains Sovereign Love (1909, revised 1913), Birthright (1911), Maurice Harte (1912), The Briery Gap (1917), Autumn Fire (1925), and The Pipe in the Fields (1927), together with Appendices containing Murray's essay 'George Shiels, Brinsley MacNamara, Etc.' (1939), which not only discusses these authors' work but sheds considerable light on his own views about playwriting, and Illumination (1939) which despite its evident weaknesses is still the best of his later dramas. There is a bibliographical checklist of his writings.

 

More info →
Sean O’Casey, Centenary Essays

Sean O’Casey, Centenary Essays

£33.00
ISBN: 978-0-86140-008-9
21.6 x 13.8 cm.    x, 257 pp. 1981   Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume  7

This volume was created to mark the centenary of the birth of Sean O’Casey. It covers every aspect of his life and work, with essays from leading scholars in the field of O’Casey studies: Ronald Ayling, Bernard Benstock, Mary FitzGerald, David Krause, Robert G. Lowery, William J. Maroldo, Alan Simp­son and Stanley Weintraub, to­gether with a Chronology and a list of productions of O’Casey’s plays, both by Robert G. Lowery. The subjects covered include O’Casey’s relations with the Abbey Theatre, Lady Gregory, W. B. Yeats, and Bernard Shaw together with assessments of the influence that James Joyce, politics, religion and Ireland had on the play­wright and his plays.

CONTENTS
SEAN O'CASEY: A CHRONOLOGY.  Robert G.Lowery
SEAN O'CASEY AND THE ABBEY THEATRE, DUBLIN.  Ronald Ayling
SEAN O'CASEY AND/OR JAMES JOYCE.  Bernard Benstock
SEAN O'CASEY AND LADY GREGORY: THE RECORD OF A FRIENDSHIP.  Mary FitzGerald
THE DRUIDIC AFFINITIES OF O'CASEY AND YEATS.  David Krause
SEAN O'CASEY: ART AND POLITICS.  Robert G.Lowery
EARLIEST YOUTH: PRISTINE CATHOLICISM AND GREEN PATRIOTISM IN O'CASEY'S IRISH BOOKS.  William J.Maroldo
THE UNHOLY TRINITY: A SIMPLE GUIDE TO HOLY IRELAND c. 1880-1980.  Alan Simpson
SHAW'S OTHER KEEGAN: O'CASEY AND G.B.S.  Stanley Weintraub
SEAN O'CASEY AND THE ABBEY THEATRE.  Robert G.Lowery
Index

More info →

Images of Invention: Essays on Irish Writing

Images of Invention: Essays on Irish Writing

£35.00

21.6 x 13.8 cm.     xii, 351 pp.    1996   Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 46

In this collection of twenty-two essays written over the last two decades, Professor Jeffares looks at the work of many of the most famous 17th to 20th century Irish writers - from Swift and Farquhar to Joyce, Yeats, Moore and Somerville & Ross, via Goldsmith, Lady Morgan, Lever, and Maturin, as well branching out with essays on Maud Gonne, Wilfrid Scawen Blunt and Sir Robert Richard Torrens.

The titles of the essays are
'Swift and the Ireland of his Day',
'Swift: The Practical Poet',
'Aspects of Swift as a Letter Writer',
'Farquhar's Final Comedies',
'Goodnatured Goldsmith',
'The Vicar of Wakefield',
'The Wild Irish Girl', Lady Morgan's O'Donnel',
'Maturin the Innovator',
'Reading Lever',
'Yeats and the Wrong Lever',
'Lord Kilgobbin',
'Torrens: Irishman in South Australia',
'George Moore: Portrait for Radio',
'Somerville and Ross: an Introduction',
'Yeats's Great Black Ragged Bird',
'Memories of Maud Gonne',
'The Fortunes of Richard Mahony: An Anglo-Irishman reconsidered',
'Blunt: Almost an Honorary Irishman',
'Joyce's Precursors',
'Joyce's "Done Half by Design"', and
'The Realistic Novel in Ireland 1900-1945'.

Together, they provide scholar and general reader alike with an important and stimulating overview of major authors and aspects of Irish literature, some of which deserve much more study than they presently receive.

A. Norman Jeffares (1920-2005) was the author of W.B.Yeats: Man and Poet (1949; 1962) and W.B.Yeats: A New Biography (1988), he has edited Yeats's Poems (1989), A Vision (1990) and various other books of Yeats as well as writing a Commentary (1968) and a New Commentary (1984) on Yeats's poems and, with A.S.Knowland, a Commentary on the plays. His co-edited books include The Scientific Background, with M. Bryn Davies, and Irish Childhoods, with Anthony Kamm. In addition to A History of Anglo-Irish Literature and various editions of and writings on English, Irish and American authors, he has edited twenty-four Restoration comedies for the Folio Society. As Derry Jeffares, he has written two books of poems: Brought Up in Dublin and Brought Up to Leave.  His recent work includes The Selected Poems of Swift; The Gonne-Yeats Letters, with Anna MacBride White; Joycechoyce, with Brendan Kennelly; Ireland's Women, with Katie Donovan and Brendan Kennelly, the Collins Dictionary of Quotations with Martin Gray.  He has also edited The Poems and Plays of Oliver St John Gogarty (2001) and wrote an extensive Introduction to The Poems of James Stephens (2006), both published by Colin Smythe Ltd.   More info →

Omnium Gatherum, Essays for Richard Ellmann

Omnium Gatherum, Essays for Richard Ellmann

£45.00
23.4 x 15.3 cm.   xx, 500 pp. 
ISBN: 978-0-86140-288-5

Omnium Gatherum was conceived by the editors, Susan Dick, Declan Kiberd, Dougald McMillan and Joseph Ronsley, all past students of Richard Ellmann, as a festschrift to mark his retirement, but on his death some months later in May 1987 it became a memorial volume, and now honours his memory.

Containing over forty contributions, this collection begins with a number of personal pieces in prose and verse on Richard Ellmann and his work, and while most of the essays are on various aspects of the twentieth century literary figures that formed the centre of his wide range of literary interests – Joyce, Wilde and Yeats – there are also essays on Isabel Archer, Samuel Beckett, T. S. Eliot, Northrop Frye, Henry James, Denis Johnston, D. H. Lawrence, Edgar Allan Poe, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, Lytton Strachey, Virginia Woolf, and Modern­ism, as well as a Chronology and a Bibliography.

The contributors are Daniel Albright, Alison Armstrong, Christopher Butler, Carol Cantrell, Jonathan Culler, Elizabeth Butler Cullingford, Andonis Decavalles. Rupin Desai, Susan Dick, Terence Diggory, Denis Donoghue, Terry Eagleton, Rosita Fanto, Charles Feidelson, James Flannery, Charles Huttar, Bruce Johnson, John Kelleher, Brendan Kennelly, Frank Kermode, Declan Kiberd, Peter Kuch, James Laughlin, A. Walton Litz, Christie McDonald, Dougald McMillan, Dominic Manganiello, Ellsworth Mason, Vivian Merrier, Seán Ó Mórdha, Mary T. Reynolds, William K. Robertson, Joseph Ronsley, S. P. Rosenbaum, Ann Saddlemyer, Sylvan Schendler, Daniel Schneid­er, Fritz Senn, Jon Stallworthy, Lonnie Weatherby, Thomas Whitaker, and Elaine Yarosky.

More info →

James Joyce: an International Perspective

James Joyce: an International Perspective

£35.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm. xiv, 301 pp. 1982 Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 10

Published to mark the centenary of Joyce's birth, this collection has a foreword by Richard Ellmann, a message from Samuel Beckett, and essays by Bernard Benstock, Paul & Sylvia Botheroyd, Terence Brown, Suheil Bushrui, Paul van Caspel, Dominic Daniel, Phillip Herring, Declan Kiberd, Augustine Martin, Vivian Mercier, David Norris, John Paul Riquelme, Charles Rossmann, Ann Saddlemyer, Thomas F.Staley and Francis Warner, as well as poems by Suzanne Brown, Suheil Bushrui, John Montague and Gearóid Ó Clérigh, and a chronology. It covers every aspect of Joyce's work, with essays on each of the major works, on his poetry, and studies on various aspects of his life, the influence of Rimbaud, Joyce's connections with the Irish Dramatic Movement, and Joyce in Dublin, as well as essays on Joyce scholarship up to the date of publication.

'All in all, a rewarding compilation, rarely arid, and frequently vivacious.' Sunday Tribune

'an excellent book, one of the most provocative and rewarding in the current centenary-year cornucopia.' Books Ireland'

CONTENTS
A Message from Samuel Beckett
In Memoriam Sir Desmond Cochrane 1918-1979
Foreword: JOYCE AFTER A HUNDRED YEARS. Richard Ellmann
Acknowledgements
Introduction. Suheil Badi Bushrui and Bernard Benstock
JAMES JOYCE - NÓ SÉAMAS SEOIGHE. Gearóid Ó Clérigh
DUBLIN OF DUBLINERS. Terence Brown
THE READER'S ROLE IN A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN. Charles Rossman
EXILES: A MORAL STATEMENT. Dominic Daniel
ON THE NATURE OF EVIDENCE IN ULYSSES. Bernard Benstock
JOHN EGLINTON AS SOCRATES: A STUDY OF `SCYLLA AND CHARYBDIS'. Vivian Mercier
TWISTS OF THE TELLER'S TALE: FINNEGANS WAKE. John Paul Riquelme
THE POETRY OF JAMES JOYCE. FRANCIS WARNER
JAMES JOYCE. John Montague
A TURNIP FOR THE BOOKS: JAMES JOYCE, A CENTENARY TRIBUTE. David Norris
SIN AND SECRECY IN JOYCE'S FICTION. Augustine Martin
THE VULGARITY OF HEROICS: JOYCE'S ULYSSES. Declan Kiberd
NIGHT FOX: FOR JAMES JOYCE. Suzanne Brown
JOYCE AND RIMBAUD. AN INTRODUCTORY ESSAY. Phillip Herring
JAMES JOYCE AND THE IRISH DRAMATIC MOVEMENT. Ann Saddlemyer
THE WANDERS: FOR JAMES JOYCE. Suheil Bushrui
JOYCE STUDIES IN THE NETHERLANDS. Paul van Caspel
JOYCE IN GERMANY AND SWITZERLAND. Paul and Sylvia Botheroyd
JOYCE IN THE ARAB WORLD. Suheil Bushrui
FOLLOWING ARIADNE'S STRING: TRACING JOYCE SCHOLARSHIP
INTO THE EIGHTIES. Thomas F.Staley
Notes on Contributors
Index More info →

Irish Writers and Religion

Irish Writers and Religion

£30.00
IASAIL-JAPAN series Volume 4

In Memory of Barbara Hayley

This volume analyses the interplay between religion and society in Ireland and how Irish writing, whether poetry, prose, drama, sermon or pamphlet, has reflected that interplay, and how the idea of wholeness and integration, as part of the religious search, informs Irish writing.

Irish literature has been influenced by religion from the beginning. Writing itself came about as a result of the conversion to Christianity, because the early church brought with it a Latin orthography which the native men of learning adopted. Pagan beliefs and practices were assimilated into Christianity, but not entirely so: a theme that surfaces continually in Irish writing is the conflict between Pagan and Christian values. This tension is also an interaction: one of the characteristics of Irish literature of all periods is its capacity to retain pagan stories and modes of thought. This retention reflects a society which, while Christianised, has many roots in a pre-Christian Celtic past.

The essays follow a broadly chronological pattern covering every facet of the subject, starting with Paganism in early Ireland, and moving on to the literary uses of folk belief and religion in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.

CONTENTS
'Paganism and Society in Early Ireland'. Séamus MacMathúna
'Literature and Religion in Eighteenth-Century Ireland: A Critical Survey'. Joseph McMinn
'Religion and Society in Nineteenth-Century Fiction'. Barbara Hayley
'The Word, the Lore, and the Spirit: Folk Religion and the Supernatural in Modern Irish Literature'. Dáithi Ó hÓgáin
'Ghosts in Anglo-Irish Literature'. Peter Denman
'Shaw and Creative Evolution'. A. M. Gibbs
'Catholicism in the Culture of the New Ireland: Canon Sheehan and Daniel Corkery'. Ruth Fleischmann
'Yeats and Religion'. Mitsuko Ohno
'Joyce and Catholicism'. Eamonn Hughes
'Francis Stuart and Religion: Sharing the Leper's Lair'. Anne McCartney
'Received Religion and Secular Vision: MacNeice and Kavanagh'. Alan Peacock
'"A mythology with which I am perfectly familiar": Samuel Beckett and the Absence of God'. Lance St John Butler
'Pilgrim's Progress: on the Poetry of Desmond Egan and Others'. Patrick Rafroidi
'Religion?'. Desmond Egan
'Mis and Dubh Ruis: A Parable of Psychic Transformation'. Nuala ni Dhomhnaill
Notes
Notes on Contributors
Index

More info →

Denis Johnston, A Retrospective

Denis Johnston, A Retrospective

£38.00

Published to mark Johnston's eightieth birthday, when he was the doyen of Ireland's living playwrights, this volume brings together memories from friends and critical essays on his work and achievement by leading scholars – John Boyd, Curtis Canfield, Richard Allen Cave, Mark Culme-Seymour, Cyril Cusack, Hilton Edwards, Maurice Elliott, Harold Ferrar, Robert Hogan, Thomas Kilroy, Roger McHugh, Micheál mac Liammóir, D.E.S.Maxwell, Vivian Mercier, Christopher Murray, B.L.Reid, Joseph Ronsley and Christine St Peter – together with a checklist of Denis Johnston's writings compiled by the editor of this volume.

Included as an appendix are some recent revisions by Denis Johnston to his A Bride for the Unicorn.

CONTENTS
Introduction
List of Illustrations
AN APPRECIATION. Hilton Edwards
THE OLD LADY SAYS `NO!' Micheál MacLiammóir
THE OLD LADY: IN PRINCIPIO. Christine St Peter
WAITING FOR EMMET. D.E.S.Maxwell
A NOTE ON THE NATURE OF EXPRESSIONISM AND DENIS JOHNSTON'S PLAYS. Curtis Canfield
THE MOON IN THE YELLOW RIVER: DENIS JOHNSTON'S SHAVIANISM. Thomas Kilroy
DENIS JOHNSTON'S HORSE LAUGH. Robert Hogan
JOHNSTON, TOLLER AND EXPRESSIONISM. Richard Allen Cave
THE GOLDEN CUCKOO: `A VERY REMARKABLE BIRD'. Christopher Murray
'HE IS ALWAYS JUST ROUND THE NEXT CORNER.' DENIS JOHNSTON'S IN SEARCH OF SWIFT . Maurice Elliott
'A HUMANE AND WELL-INTENTIONED PIECE OF GALLANTRY': DENIS JOHNSTON'S THE SCYTHE AND THE SUNSET Joseph Ronsley
THE ENDLESS SEARCH. John Boyd
THE PLAYS OF DENIS JOHNSTON. Roger McHugh
DEAR DENIS! Cyril Cusack
DENIS JOHNSTON'S SPIRITUAL QUEST. Harold Ferrar
JOHNSTON IN ACADEME. B.L. Reid
WITH DENIS JOHNSTON IN THE WESTERN DESERT. Mark Culme-Seymour
PERFECTION OF THE LIFE OR OF THE WORK. Vivian Mercier
CHECKLIST-LIST OF DENIS JOHNSTON'S WRITINGS. Joseph Ronsley
APPENDIX: REVISIONS TO A BRIDE FOR THE UNICORN, ETC. Denis Johnston
Notes on Contributors
Index

More info →

Paul Muldoon: Poetry, Prose, & Drama. A Collection of Critical Essays

Paul Muldoon: Poetry, Prose, & Drama. A Collection of Critical Essays

£35.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     viii, 291 pp.  2006    
   Ulster Editions & Monographs Series (ISSN 0954-3392) volume 14

Ever since his student efforts thrilled Seamus Heaney in the early 1970s, Paul Muldoon has written poetry acclaimed for its brilliance and originality, its mischievousness, wit and complex artifice. Today, Muldoon is widely considered to be the greatest poet of his generation, not just in Ireland, but throughout the English-speaking world.

The twelve essays collected here chart the development of this unpredictable, innovative and challenging talent over the last thirty years. They offer a kaleidoscopic examination of Muldoon’s writings in the three genres of poetry, prose and drama, from a variety of perspectives, and without any polemical intention beyond that of celebrating his achievement.

Taken together, these essays attempt to map the continuity of Muldoon’s diverse and substantial oeuvre, but also to highlight its constant experimentalism; they demonstrate how difficult it is for us to know how seriously we should take anything Muldoon says, but alert us to the ways in which the playfulness and cleverness contribute to a profound ethical seriousness; they explore his complexly deconstructive technique to show how it represents a constant renewal of the self and of form; they show how the momentum for escape from the past is always contained within the recognition of the impossibility of escape; they examine the work as a means of both evasive self-protection from the world and self-expression of an intense emotional life; they calculate the ratios of scepticism and passion, unknowing and knowingness, which give the work its uniquely compelling power; they orientate the reader towards the Muldoonian home as always being located where it is not; they help us to see the way the writing folds back or feeds upon itself, and upon others’ writings, yet yearns for freedom and transcendence. They are confirmation of the validity of Heaney’s comment of nearly thirty years ago, when he said that Muldoon was the kind of writer who doesn’t offer us answers, but keep us alive in the middle of the question.

The contributors are (in order of the essays) Peter Denman, Richard York, Kathleen McCracken, Tim Kendall, Tim Hancock, Elmer Kennedy-Andrews, Stan Smith, Ivan Phillips, Clair Wills, Heather O’Donoghue, Guinn Batten, and Jerzy Jarniewicz. A number of these essays were originally delivered as lectures at the fifth Ulster Symposium at the University of Ulster at Coleraine in 2000. Also included is a transcript of the symposium interview that Neil Corcoran conducted with the poet.

Elmer Kennedy-Andrews is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Ulster at Coleraine. His books include The Poetry of Seamus Heaney: All the Realms of Whisper (1988); (editor) Seamus Heaney: A Collection of Critical Essays (1992); (editor) Contemporary Irish Poetry: A Collection of Critical Essays (1992); The Art of Brian Friel: Neither Dreams nor Reality (1995); The Poetry of Seamus Heaney; Icon Critical Guides (1998), (editor) Irish Fiction Since 1960 (2004),  Fiction and the Northern Ireland Troubles: (De-) Constructing the North (2003), and Writing Home: Poetry and Place in Northern Ireland 1968-2008 (2009).

More info →
O’Casey the Dramatist

O’Casey the Dramatist

£40.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 19

O’Casey, the Dramatist is the first study to analyse each of Sean O’Casey’s plays in the context of the whole body of his work. His first plays were performed by the Abbey Theatre in Dublin until it refused The Silver Tassie, a rejection that brought about a most acrimonious debate, broke up friendships, and caused O’Casey to sever his links with the Abbey. Its directors were unable to understand the first of his experimental plays, and could not appreciate its true quality. Thence­forth O'Casey’s writing developed along new lines, mostly away from his Irish roots.

In popular estimation his best plays are those of the Dublin years – The Shadow of a Gunman, Juno and the Paycock and The Plough and the Stars – but many of his later works are greatly undervalued; indeed The Silver Tassie, Within the Gates, Purple Dust, Red Roses for Me, Hall of Healing, Cock-a-doodle Dandy and The Bishop's Bonfire are all masterpieces of modern drama, as this study shows.

Professor Kosok considers all the twenty-three extant plays, tracing O'Casey's development as a playwright through a chronological study and show­ing that his work can be divided into five periods, which are considered in this volume under the headings ‘Dublin as a Mirror of the World’, 'Experiments’, ‘Ideology and Drama', ‘Ireland as a Microcosm', and ‘Bitterness and Recon­ciliation’. He ends this study with a section headed ‘Continuity and Originality' in which he briefly summarises the findings of previous scholarship, suggests some additional answers to general problems, and indicates some avenues for future research.

  More info →

Irish Influences on Korean Theatre during the 1920s and 1930s

Irish Influences on Korean Theatre during the 1920s and 1930s

£29.50
21.6 x 13.8 cm.    262 pp. 2003
ISBN: 978-0-86140-453-7

It is well known that through their plays and lecture tours the dramatists of the Irish Literary Revival influenced and inspired those of America and elsewhere to set up their own national theatres and theatre movements, but most students of the Revival are unaware of just how far this influence extended. It would surely have surprised the founders and early playwrights of the Abbey Theatre to learn that their plays were not only being published in Japan (which they knew), but were also influencing translators, playwrights, critics and theatre associations in Korea – though it is hardly surprising that with little knowledge of Irish culture the translators often misinterpreted the plays and gave them political or social slants entirely lacking in the originals.

In the present work, Won-Jae Jang describes the development of Korean theatre societies such as the Theatre Arts Association, the Earth Moon Society, and the Theatre Arts Research Association during the first quarter of the 20th century, how plays by Lady Gregory, J.M. Synge, Lord Dunsany, Sean O’Casey and T.C. Murray were interpreted – or misinterpreted – by Korean translators, and then describes their impact on Korean dramatists, showing in particular how the work of Synge and O’Casey influenced Chi-Jin Yoo (translations of three of whose plays – The Cow, The Mud Hut and The Donkey – are published in a companion volume, ISBN 978-0-86140-452-0), and Murray influenced Se-Deok Ham. This work therefore opens up Irish Drama’s hitherto little-known influences on a region of the Eastern hemisphere.

Won-Jae Jang was born in Seoul, graduated from Korea University (BA), and Goldsmiths College, University of London (MA), and was granted his PhD from Royal Holloway, University of London in 2000. He is now working for Soongsil University as a Junior Professor.

More info →