Genre: Literary Criticism
The Plays – Book 2

The Plays – Book 2

£8.99
Edited by Ann Saddlemyer

ISBN: 978-0-86140-061-4
xxxvi, 304 pp. 21.4cm
J.M.Synge died in 1909 and The Works of John M. Synge were published in four volumes by Maunsel & Co., Dublin, in 1910. Since that time, with the exception of a few minor verses and one or two fragments of prose, the canon of his work has remained unaltered. Nevertheless, much unpublished material exists, for the most part of great interest and significance for the understanding of Synge's methods of work and development. This material, including early drafts of the plays, notebooks, poems, and fragments of poetic drama, has now been thoroughly explored in order to create this definitive edition, first published by Oxford University Press 1962-68, which not only collects together all that is of significance in his printed and in his unprinted work, but also, by a careful use of worksheets and early drafts, indicates much of the process of creation.

The Collected Works is under the general editorship of the late Professor Robin Skelton, of the University of Victoria, British Columbia. The first volume contains his edition of Synge's poems and translations; the second assembles all Synge's prose writings of any merit or interest, edited by the late Dr Alan Price, of The Queen's University, Belfast.

The third and fourth volumes are devoted to Synge's plays, edited by Professor Ann Saddlemyer, then of Victoria College, University of Toronto, now retired. The first of these volumes contains texts of Riders to the Sea, The Shadow of the Glen, and The Well of the Saints, and of the originally little known When the Moon has Set, with appendices analysing the drafts of each play and giving details of first productions. In addition the volume contains much unpublished material, scenarios, dialogues, and fragments, discovered among Synge's notebooks.

This volume provides definitive texts of The Tinker's Wedding, The Playboy of the Western World, and Deirdre of the Sorrows. For all these three plays recently discovered manuscript and notebook material has involved a certain amount of textual alteration; an examination of the long-lost final typescript of The Playboy of the Western World has provided many clues to the author's intentions, while comparison of the various drafts of Deirdre of the Sorrows with the typescript given by the executors to Yeats and Lady Gregory has enabled Dr Saddlemyer to determine the extent of posthumous collaboration.

Synge rewrote his plays many times; one act of The Playboy ran to at least fifteen full drafts, not counting numerous alterations. By examining each available draft of every play, the editor has been able to provide not only a final text of each play as close as possible to the dramatist's version, but in her accompanying notes almost a variorum study of significant passages. Appendixes record the growth of each play from the original scenario through many drafts to the final text, and include discarded scenes which throw new light on the playwright's creative process. Details of first productions and a comprehensive description of all the manuscript sources are also included. The introduction traces the history of each play, quoting extensively from Synge's unpublished correspondence and notebooks to record the dramatist's attitude to his own work in the making, and to set each play against the broader background of the Abbey Theatre. In searching out the material for this edition, Dr Saddlemyer has made use of public and private collections in both Ireland and the United States, and has also included a glossary and guide to pronunciation.

These volumes were published by arrangement with Oxford University Press.

More info →

Hearts And Minds

Hearts And Minds

£45.00

The Princess Grace Irish Library’s 2000 symposium brought together Irish critics and historians to assess the state of culture and society in the 'long nineteenth century' – 1800-1922 – during which the Act of Union defined the form of government and representation in Ireland as well as, to a great extent, the forms of opposition. Besides investigating the nature of the Union – its strengths and weaknesses, its character and progress – this bicentenary collection considers questions of private conscience and popular consciousness, language and iconography, science and evangelism, Diaspora and disempowerment, terror and consent, memory and amnesia, separation and adherence in the connected spheres of society, politics and culture.

The contributors are Anthony Cronin, Thomas Bartlett, Síghle Breathnach-Lynch, Claire Connolly, Tom Dunne, Marianne Elliott, J. W. Foster, Roy Foster, Luke Gibbons, Liam Kennedy, Joep Leerssen, W. J. McCormack, James Murphy, Patrick O'Sullivan, Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh and Norman Vance. It is the thirteenth publication in the Princess Grace Irish Library Literary series (ISSN 0269-2619).

BRUCE STEWART is the Literary Adviser of the Princess Grace Irish Library, Monaco, and teaches Anglo-Irish Literature at the University of Ulster at Coleraine. He served as Assistant Editor of The Oxford Companion to Irish Literature edited by Robert Welch (1995). More recently he was responsible for the setting up of PGIL EIRData, a large-scale website dedicated to Irish literary and biographical information and containing at its heart a bio-bibliographical account of some 4,500 Irish authors of all periods. It was launched by Her Excellency Mary McAleese, President of Ireland, and H. S. H. Prince Albert during the symposium, and is located at http://www.pgil-eirdata.org.

Front cover illustration (continuing onto front flap): 'The Wedding of the Princess Aoife of Leinster with Richard de Clare, Earl of Pembroke (Strongbow)' by Daniel Maclise. More info →

The Literary Works of Jack B. Yeats

The Literary Works of Jack B. Yeats

£33.00

There is far more to Jack Yeats than meets the eye, and it is to be hoped that he will soon be recognised as deserving of a place in the forefront of Irish letters. In recent years, however, his greatness as a painter has eclipsed his writings and this work seeks to redress the position. John Purser brings a knowledge of symbolism and language used in the West of Ireland to his study, and with the aid of previously unused evidence and a new chronology, new interpretations are given for many of Jack Yeats's works and an overall pattern is revealed.

The religious imagery of The Careless Flower and The Amaranthers is developed, and the significance of the theme of inheritance in the latter work is brought out for the first time, allowing the two halves of the novel to be seen more clearly as an integrated whole. The Charmed Life is shown to have an underlying Faustian and Christian significance, related to the progress of Ireland as a nation, and Ah Well is interpreted as a remarkable fable of a kind of Eden in reverse. Harlequin's Positions is interpreted as a riposte to Shaw and an assertion of Ireland's need and ability to maintain her independence in the face of the approaching war, and La La Noo, The Green Wave and In Sand are seen in part as approving extensions of that theme.

As well as his father, major literary figures recognised his genius – Synge (who shared a journey and vision of Ireland with him), Joyce (who recognised a shared methodology), his brother (who knew that few would recognise Jack's genius, though he saw it himself), and Beckett (who learned much from him and wrote in profound admiration of The Amaranthers). One day John Butler Yeats's prophecy, 'Some day I shall be remembered as the father of a great poet, and the poet is Jack', will come true.

More info →
Literary Inter-relations: Ireland, Egypt and the Far East

Literary Inter-relations: Ireland, Egypt and the Far East

£38.00

21.6 x 13.8 cm.     x, 426 pp.  1996      Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 47

This volume publishes the papers given at the International Association for the Study of Anglo-Irish Literature's 1993 conference, hosted by the Ain Shams University, Cairo.

 It was the first conference to be held with this theme, which covers Ireland's literary relationships with middle and far-eastern countries, and shows the similarities and differences between literary traditions in different countries as well as the influence of history – for example, both Ireland and Egypt had to extract themselves from British political domination, and both had to take extreme actions to succeed.

The contributions cover the themes of 'Irishness and Egyptianness', 'Myth, Fable and Folklore', 'Regionalism and Cultural Politics', 'Colonialism' and 'The 'Urban and the Rural', with keynote papers by Professors Maureen Murphy ('Folk Narrative Motifs in Egyptian, Irish and Native American Folklore and Literature'), Terry Eagleton ('Form and Ideology in the Anglo-Irish Novel'), Declan Kiberd ('Yeats and the National Longing for Form') and Richard Allen Cave ('The City versus the Village') with other papers covering Irish authors – Samuel Beckett, Elizabeth Bowen, Brendan Behan, Brian Friel, Sir William and Lady Gregory, Lafcadio Hearn, Jennifer Johnston, James Joyce, Brendan Kennelly, Thomas Kinsella, Edward Martyn, C.R.Maturin, George Moore and Thomas Moore, Thomas Murphy, Flann O'Brien, Sean O'Faolain, Eugene O'Neill, Bernard Shaw, James Stephens, Jonathan Swift (compared with Conrad), Honor Tracy, Oscar Wilde, W.B.Yeats – Egyptian, South African and Eastern authors – Abdel Rahman Al-Sharqawi, Mahmoud Diab, Tawfik Elhakim, Yusuf Idris, Goha, Naguib Mahfouz, Yukio Mishima, Etedal Othman, Karel Schoeman – contemporary poetry of Northern Ireland, Egyptian and Irish film, and the literary parallels between 18th century Anglo-Irish and 20th century Egyptian literature.

  More info →
Irish Literature and Culture

Irish Literature and Culture

£25.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     x, 196 pp.   1992     Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X)  volume 35

This volume deals with the illumination of literature through the study of other art forms. A diverse and absorbing variety of subjects are called in aid of literary analysis, including music, aesthetics, politics, rebellion, ritual, stage design, painting, sociology, cinema, and colonisation. The essays are adapted from papers given at the 1988 Conference of the Canadian Association for Irish Studies in Montreal, entitled `Cultural and Artistic Contexts of Irish Literature'.

Two essays, by Andrew Carpenter and Mary Helen Thuente, have been added to lend completeness to the collection. The other contributors are: Zack Bowen, Richard Allen Cave, Terry Egleton, John Wilson Foster, Richard Kearney, Declan Kiberd, Edna Longley, Patrick Rafroidi and Wolfgang Zach, with the conference opening address by Hiroshi Suzuki.

PREFACE. Michael Kenneally
OPENING ADDRESS. Hiroshi Suzuki
CHANGING VIEWS ON IRISH MUSICAL AND LITERARY CULTURE IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ANGLO-IRISH LITERATURE. Andrew Carpenter
AESTHETICS AND POLITICS In EDMUND BURKE. Terry Eagleton
THE LITERARY SIGNIFICANCE OF THE UNITED IRISHMEN. Mary Helen Thuente
THOMAS MOORE: TOWARDS A REASSESSMENT? Patrick Refroidi
MUSIC AND RITUAL IN ULYSSES. Zack Bowen
STAGE DESIGN AS A FORM OF DRAMATIC CRITICISM. Richard allen Cave
NO MORE POEMS ABOUT PAINTINGS? Edna Longley
CRITICISM, THEATRE AND POLITICS: BRIAN FRIEL'S THE FREEDOM OF THE CITY IN ITS EARLY RECEPTION. Wolfgang Zach
FATHERS AND SONS: IRISH STYLE. Declan Kiberd
MODERN IRISH CINEMA: RE-VIEWING TRADITIONS. Richard Kearney
CULTURE AND COLONIZATION: A NORTHERN PERSPECTIVE. John Wilson Foster
Notes
Notes on Contributors
Index

  More info →

The Irish Writer and the City

The Irish Writer and the City

£30.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.      x, 203 pp.     1984       Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 18
.

The papers in this collection were given at the fifth triennial conference of the International Association for the Study of Anglo-Irish Literature held at University College, Dublin in July 1982.

The theme of the conference – the Irish writer and the city – is one that has not been extensively studied. Traditionally Irish writing has concerned itself with the countryside and the Big House, but as essays in this collection show, there was a hidden literature of the city, particularly in the drama, in the eighteenth and nine­teenth centuries, and in the nineteenth the city was a recurrent element in novels from Maria Edgeworth to George Moore. The incidence of urban settings increased in the twentieth century with Belfast, Cork, Dublin and Limerick emerging as challenging centres of literary concern. It is the complex issue of the relationships between the writers and the cities that these essays discuss. The movement of population from the countryside to the cities in the late nineteenth century led to some ambivalence on the part of writers who viewed the urban setting with a distaste that was partly determined by nostalgia for the rural hinterland. Social revolution complicated the problem by reducing the social density and creating a middle class that took some time to assert itself. Eventually ambivalence and dis­taste were replaced by acceptance or at least by the recognition that the city was home, the world they knew best and could best describe. These essays help us to understand how that confidence de­veloped and to see its thematic, technical and linguistic features. In the process they show that the subject of the Irish writer and the city is well worth examining.

More info →

Selected Plays of Austin Clarke

Selected Plays of Austin Clarke

£36.00
Chosen and Introduced by Mary Shine Thompson

The fourteenth volume of the Irish Drama Selections series (ISSN 0260-7962), General Editors: Joseph Ronsley and Ann Saddlemyer.

21.6 x 13.8 cm.  
Contains: The Son of Learning, The Flame, Black Fast, The Kiss, As the Crow Flies, The Viscount of Blarney, The Second Kiss, Liberty Lane,and the hitherto unpublished The Frenzy of Sweeney and St Patrick’s Purgatory (a translation of Calderón’s play), ‘Verse Speaking’, ‘Verse Speaking and Verse Drama’, and a bibliographical checklist.

Austin Clarke (1896-1974) is known as a poet, a playwright, a broadcaster and a novelist. In the later part of his life his work became better known principally through the support given by Liam Miller and the Dolmen Press in publishing his Collected Plays (1963) and later single plays, and volumes of poems, culminating in his Collected Poems (1974). His work as a reviewer was ceaseless, and during his life he wrote over 1,500 reviews, assessing over 5,000 books, but it must be as one of twentieth century Ireland’s most important poets that he is best known.

Clarke’s plays are less well known, both perhaps because they are verse plays, and also because they have been out of print for so many years, so the publication of a selection was long overdue.

Mary Shine Thompson is a lecturer in the English Department of St Patrick's College Drumcondra (Dublin City University) and College Coordinator of Research. Her doctoral dissertation is entitled 'Austin Clarke; A Literary Life-Chronology'. She was commissioned to prepare the National Library of Ireland's Catalogue of its Austin Clarke holdings, completed in 2003. Among her publications are Studies in Children Literature 1500-2000  (Four Courts Press, 2004) and Treasure Islands, Real And Imagined, in Children's Literature (2005), both edited with C. Keenan.

Please note. Due to changes in sale patterns since the series was started we have not issued this work in paperback. ISBN 0-86140-209-X is cancelled.

  More info →

Charles Lever: New Evaluations

Charles Lever: New Evaluations

£25.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     xvi, 131 pp.  + 16 pp illus.       1991
  Ulster Editions & Monographs series (ISSN 0954-3392)  volume 3

These essays comprise the first extensive re-appraisal of Charles Lever for over fifty years. Once regarded as the equal of Dickens, Thackeray and Trollope, Lever’s public turned their backs upon him when he changed style and genre after making his name with comic military tales. He never recaptured his early popularity, but his later novels in fact manifest a much more serious and crafted approach to fiction, and richly deserve revival.

Lever’s own turbulent and often unhappy life of social and cultural exile in Europe provides the hidden theme of many of his better novels. Continental and Irish settings and preoccupations are juxtaposed, making his contribution to the Anglo-Irish novel per se an unusual and challenging one.

Lever is a shrewd observer of character – particularly of female character; few of his better-remembered contemporaries write with more insight about women; old, young, rich, poor; loving, hating, dominating, subjected. His eye for place is acute; Scott is his model, but Lever’s ability to correlate character with environment is finely developed. His political observations, always well-integrated into the fabric of his plot, are shrewd and balanced.

The current neglect of this accomplished and cosmopolitan Irishman is entirely unwarranted. Though he wrote too much, too hastily, and under pressures sometimes too much dominated by the intransigent necessities of serial publication, the contri­butors to this volume seek to show that Lever deserves a re-appraisal, and a revival of attention to his extensive and often original output. Thus, hopefully, the revival of interest in Charles Lever, commencing with this volume, should attract readers of the novel well beyond the specialist range of Anglo-Irish scholars.

Contents
Introduction: 'The Famous Irish Lever'. Tony Bareham
'Reading Lever'. A. Norman Jeffares
'A Tale of Love and War: Charles O'Malley'. Lorna Reynolds
'Dr Lever at Portstewart'. Bill Rodgers
'Transitional States in Lever'. Richard Haslam
'Lever's Post-Famine Landscape'. Chris Morash
'Charles Lever and the Outsider'. Tony Bareham
Notes
Index
        More info →
The Plays – Book 1

The Plays – Book 1

£7.99
Edited by Ann Saddlemyer

ISBN: 978-0-86140-060-7

J.M.Synge died in 1909 and The Works of John M. Synge were published in four volumes by Maunsel & Co., Dublin, in 1910. Since that time, with the exception of a few minor verses and one or two fragments of prose, the canon of his work has remained unaltered. Nevertheless, much unpublished material exists, for the most part of great interest and significance for the understanding of Synge's methods of work and development. This material, including early drafts of the plays, notebooks, poems, and fragments of poetic drama, has now been thoroughly explored in order to create this definitive edition, first published by Oxford University Press 1962-68, which not only collects together all that is of significance in his printed and in his unprinted work, but also, by a careful use of worksheets and early drafts, indicates much of the process of creation which occurred before the production of the printed page.

The Collected Works is in four volumes, under the general editorship of the late Professor Robin Skelton, of the University of Victoria, British Columbia. The first volume contains edition of Synge's poems and translations, the second assembles all Synge's prose writings of ant merit or interest, edited by the late Dr Alan Price, of The Queen's University, Belfast.

The third and fourth volumes are devoted to Synge's plays, edited by Professor Ann Saddlemyer, then of Victoria College, University of Toronto, now retired. Only five of the plays were published during Synge's lifetime. One emptied the Abbey Theatre, yet was the first of its productions to be translated and performed on the Continent; one caused riots in both Britain and America; one was considered 'too dangerous' to be performed in Ireland. All were written during the last seven years of Synge's life, for the Abbey Theatre, of which he was co-director with W. B. Yeats and Lady Gregory. But although his output was comparatively slight, Synge's contribution to the development of modern drama is immeasurable.

In the first volume of the plays we see the development of the playwright's craft. Definitive texts, based on Synge's own notebooks and typewritten drafts, are provided of Riders to the Sea, The Shadow of the Glen, and The Well of the Saints. Included is his controversial first play, When the Moon Has Set, rejected three times by his co-directors, yet carefully preserved by Synge among his papers. Other material discovered among his notebooks, scenarios, dialogues, and fragments, written between 1894 and 1908, indicates not only the scrupulousness with which Synge studied his art, but his rich and fertile imagination. A comprehensive introduction records the history of each play in the making, from genesis to finished product, at the same time setting Synge's work within the larger context of his experience as director and producer and quoting from his own letters documenting his progress. Appendices analysing the drafts of each play and giving details of first productions provide further bibliographical information and describe the numerous manuscript sources tracked down by the editor in public and private collections in both Ireland and the United States.

The second volume of plays contains texts of The Tinker's Wedding, The Playboy of the Western World, and Deirdre of the Sorrows, with similar notes and appendices.

These volumes were published by arrangement with Oxford University Press.

More info →

That Other World

That Other World

£40.00

Volume 1 ISBN: 0-86140-417-2 / 978-0-86140-417-9 £40.00

Volume 2 ISBN: 0-86140-418-1 / 978-0-86140-418-6 £40.00

The Pair ISBN: 0-86140-419-X £80.00 / 978-0-86140-419-3

The Supernatural and the Fantastic in Irish Literature & its Contexts

As with every other region of Europe and the world, the traditional folklore of Ireland abounds with tales involving the supernatural and the fantastic, but nowhere else have these tales so influenced the literature and the shaping of that country, and no other country has produced so many world-famous authors whose work has shown those influences.

These intermingling themes were therefore the ideal subject for a symposium held at the Princess Grace Irish Library, Monaco, in May 1998 to which, reflecting the international interest in the subject, a host of international scholars contributed, and whose papers are published in these two volumes.

The subjects range from early Irish history and folklore to the present day, but mainly deal with nineteenth and twentieth century literature, from Gothic novels, Sheridan Le Fanu, Bram Stoker, and Oscar Wilde, through W.B.Yeats, Lord Dunsany, Elizabeth Bowen, Samuel Beckett, and Flann O'Brien, to Seamus Heaney and Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill.

More info →
Irishness in a Changing Society

Irishness in a Changing Society

£30.00

In late May 1986, following the success of its first annual conference in 1985, the Princess Grace Irish Library hosted its second conference. It was attended by over thirty scholars, writers, journalists and policy-makers, who heard and gave papers concerning the concept of national identity, north and south of the Border.

This collection of the papers given at the conference has a wide-ranging appeal to anyone interested in what Irishness means. The lectures were delivered by experts in many fields: religion, history, politics, literature, economics and philosophy. The cross-currents and exchange of information and ideas between their various disciplines combined to present an exciting and thought-provoking view of Irishness as it has evolved, and is continuing to evolve today.

The contributors include R.V.Comerford, Hugh Leonard, Louis le Brocquy, Patrick Rafroidi, Maurice Harmon, Terence Brown, Richard Kearney, Mary E. Daly, Joseph Lee, David Harkness, John A. Murphy, Dermot Keogh, Maurice Goldring, Mark Mortimer, Garret Fitzgerald, John Hume, and Andy O'Mahony.

More info →
The Internationalism of Irish Literature and Drama

The Internationalism of Irish Literature and Drama

£38.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.        x, 361 pp.   1992    Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 41

This volume is based on the seventh triennial conference of the International Association for the Study of Anglo-Irish Literature, held in July 1988 at the University of Ulster, Coleraine, Co.Londonderry, Northern Ireland. The international reputation and appeal of Irish literature are reflected in the fact that the contributors are from all corners of the world, North America, Europe, Scandinavia, Africa and India.

The collection reveals the extraordinary influence that Ireland has had on world literature, especially as a model for colonial and nationalist cultures. A host of Irish writers, particularly dramatists, has been translated and adapted in countries attracted to the individuality as well as the universality of their themes. Very often, the outsiders' insight into Irish literature shows a directness and sensitivity which are most illuminating and instructive.

A revelation of this collection is the way so many Irish writers have embraced, and been deeply influenced by, the culture of other nations: important new documentary work on writers such as Maria Edgeworth, W.B.Yeats, George Russell and Derek Mahon are to be found here.

The collection is both a celebration of a truly internationalised field of study, and a tribute to a literature which has successfully emigrated throughout the world. These essays will interest all those, students and scholars alike, who recognise the value of culture and literary pluralism, and the importance of comparative studies.

For over forty years IASAIL, now the Interantional Association for the Study of Irish Literatures (IASIL), has done pioneering work in this field. By now, it may be said, Ireland has taken its rightful place amongst the literatures of the world.

 

At the time of publication Joseph McMinn was Senior Lecturer in the English Department of the University of Ulster at Jordanstown, near Belfast. He has taught in American and Germany, and his publications include John Banville: A Critical Study, Jonathan Swift: A Literary Life and, as editor, Swift's Irish Pamphlets: An Introductory Selection, all three books being published in 1991. He is presently working on an illustrated documentary of Swift's travels around Ireland.

  More info →
Cultural Contexts and Literary Idioms in Contemporary Irish Literature

Cultural Contexts and Literary Idioms in Contemporary Irish Literature

£40.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     viii, 369 pp.   1988   Studies in Contemporary Irish Literature volume 1   Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 31

This is the first of four intended volumes (only two of which got published) devoted to critical analysis of Irish writing since the 1950s. Each was intended to present a collection of essays that, taken together, should provide a solid foundation for scholars and students interested in the extraordinary achievements of Irish writers in the last three decades.

The essays in this volume map out aspects of the cultural, social and political context of contemporary literature and predominant concerns within a given genre.

The contributors as Anthony Bradley, Terence Brown, Gerald Dawe, John Wilson Foster, Tamsin Hargreaves, Claudia Harris, Dillon Johnston, Colbert Kearney, Edna Longley, Arthur E. McGuinness, Christopher Murray, Fintan O’Toole, Andrew Parkin, Anthony Roche,  Michael Toolan,  and Walentina Witoszek and Patrick F. Sheeran.

The second volume in the series is Poetry in Contemporary Irish Literature, edited by Michael Kenneally.

More info →

Charles Lever: The Lost Victorian

Charles Lever: The Lost Victorian

£33.00
With a Foreword by Benedict Kiely

21.6 x 13.8 cm.     170 pp.    2000     Ulster Editions & Monographs series (ISSN 0954-3392) volume 8

At the peak of his career, Charles Lever (1806-1872) was one of the most successful novelists in the English language, and the only mid-nineteenth century Irish novelist to vie with Charles Dickens in popularity and earning potential. Yet, within three decades of his death, his works had sunk into uninterrupted obscurity. The light-heartedness of his earliest novels, The Confessions of Harry Lorrequer (1839) and Charles O’Malley - the Irish Dragoon (1841), brought condemnation from Nationalists who championed the serious and didactic purpose of literature in highlighting the desperate plight of Ireland’s indigenous population. It is in Lever’s positive and thoughtful reaction to these criticisms that his profound contribution to Irish literature in English is to be identified, most of all in his sensitive and ultimately pessimistic analysis of the role of the doomed Protestant ascendancy.

In this incisive critical study, Stephen Haddelsey charts the rise and fall of this gifted and much-maligned commentator on Irish affairs, and calls for a reappraisal of his position in the canon of Irish literature.

Using a selection from the thirty novels and five volumes of essays, he argues that Lever’s contribution is unique in its evolution from a Tory and non-separatist stance to the near-overt and despairing advocacy of Home Rule in his final and greatest novel, Lord Kilgobbin (1872).

STEPHEN HADDELSEY is a graduate of the University of Wales. Working as a freelance editor and writer, he has contributed to projects ranging from a study of European ethnology and cultural identity, to historical atlases of Ancient Greece and the American Civil War. He is currently working on a novel and is planning a comparative critical biography of the Victorian novelists, Charles Lever, George Whyte-Melville and Francis Smedley.

CONTENTS:
Foreword by Benedict Kiely
Introduction: Writing on the Margins
1: The Novels of Dr Quicksilver
2: A Year of Growth
3: An Iniquitous Act
4: The Double-Sided Coin
5: The Art of Brevity
6: Lever's Anti-Heroines
7: Last Efforts
Notes
Index

 

More info →
Reviews and Essays of Austin Clarke

Reviews and Essays of Austin Clarke

£40.00
Edited by Gregory A. Schirmer

21.6 x 13.8 cm.      Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X)  volume 40

Austin Clarke is widely regarded as one of 20th-century Ireland's most important poets. In this selection of nearly fifty essays and reviews written over Clarke's long career, he demonstrates that he is an astute and provocative literary critic as well.

Having grown up in Dublin when the excitement of the Irish Literary Revival was still running high, Clarke knew many of the principal figures of that movement personally, and his readings of Yeats, Joyce, Synge, O'Casey, Lady Gregory, George Moore, and others, enjoy the advantages of an insider's point of view. Moreover, committed in his own poetry to the basic assumption that fuelled the Literary Revival – that the most productive course for Irish  literature lay in the direction not of England but of Ireland – Clarke in his criticism provides a way of understanding, and judging, the Revival's major writers in terms of their relationships to Ireland's rich literary and cultural traditions. At the same time, these essays call attention to a number of distinctly Irish, but often overlooked, writers working on the margins of the revival.

As Yeats observed more than once, the Irish, for all the contributions that they have made to modern fiction, poetry, and drama, have fallen somewhat short in the genre of literary criticism. Austin Clarke's essays and reviews, many of which were written under a pseudonym and so not attributed to Clarke for years, go a long way towards filling that gap.

A selection of Clarke's writings on Yeats is followed by one on other Irish writers and the Irish Literary Revival, and on Modern English and American literature. Included as an appendix is an exhaustive list of Clarke's literary criticism, mostly in periodicals, including over 400 anonymous reviews written for the Times Literary Supplement.

  Gregory A.Schirmer is the author of The Poetry of Austin Clarke and William Trevor: A Study of His Fiction, and has written widely on a variety of other modern Irish writers. He is Professor of English at the University of Mississippi.

More info →

Builders of my Soul: Greek and Roman Themes in Yeats

Builders of my Soul: Greek and Roman Themes in Yeats

£35.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.    xvi, 241 pp.  + 4pp. illus       1990     Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X)  volume 32

Builders of My Soul: Greek and Roman Themes in Yeats, fills a long-felt gap in a neglected area of Yeats studies. It begins with an account of Yeats’s knowledge of the Classics, and then deals with the topics of Philosophy, mainly Platonism; a full, new reading of ‘Under Ben Bulben’; Greek myth, used to validate both personal experience – Maud Gonne as Helen – and a cyclical theory of history; Literature, the two Oedipus plays; Visual art, including an elaborate reading of 'The Statues’, and ‘Byzantium’, the famous passage in A Vision, and the two great poems, in their historical context.

More info →

Joyce and Vico and Linguistic Theory
The Irish Book Lover. An Irish Studies Reader

The Irish Book Lover. An Irish Studies Reader

£40.00
With an Introductory Lecture by Nicholas Allen and an Integrated Index by Bruce Stewart.

The Irish Book Lover ranks as the longest-lasting of all twentieth-century Irish literary journals, with a run of 227 issues published under the editorships of John S. Crone (1909-25), Séamus Ó Casaide (1928-1930) and Colm Ó Lochlainn (1930-57). As a bibliographical and reviewing journal rather than a forum for commentary, poetry or fiction, it is less often consulted than literary journals such as the Irish Review or The Bell but nevertheless illustrates with great clarity some of the key changes in modern Irish culture and society between 1909 and 1957.

While offering a unique source of information on older, antiquarian books in Ireland, The Irish Book Lover throws open a window on the attitude of the contemporary intelligentsia to works such as James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist and W. B. Yeats’s Responsibilities, the novels of Liam O’Flaherty and Kate O’Brien or those of less-remembered writers of the day such as Temple Lane and Mrs. Thomas Concannon. Though superseded by a variety of reviewing organs, it gives an inspiring example to Irish book lovers in our own time.

The Princess Grace Irish Library has compiled a sampler of the journal here, together with an index of the entire series. The present volume also contains the introductory lecture given by Dr. Nicholas Allen at the “Irish Book Lover” Symposium held in Monaco to commemorate the journal. The symposium was also afforded a planned opportunity to survey existing resources for Irish literary history in the company of fifteen Irish publishers, librarians, teachers, critics and – last but not least – owners of Irish-studies websites.

The present volume is mirrored on the PGIL EIRData website, giving access to a body of digitised text that embraces a wider selection of the long-running journal together with an electronic index of its pages. This new departure for Irish studies has been conducted by Dr. Bruce Stewart under the terms of a contract between the Ireland Fund of Monaco to the University of Ulster under the aegis of the Princess Grace Irish Library (Monaco).

Bruce Stewart was Lecturer in Irish Literary History and Bibliography at the University of Ulster and Literary Adviser (Conseiller Littèraire) of the Princess Grace Irish Library in Monaco and director of the Library’s Biennial Symposium Series. He has edited three volumes in the Princess Grace Irish Library series and managed the production of several more. His articles and essays have been published in several leading Irish journals including Irish Review and Studies. Born in Dublin and educated at Glenstal Abbey School, Trinity College, Dublin, and the University of California, he has studied, worked and taught in America, the Middle East and England as well as Northern Ireland.

Contents

Editor’s Preface

Nicholas Allen: Introductory Lecture

The Irish Book Lover: An Irish Studies Reader

The Irish Book Lover: An Integrated Index

Bruce Stewart: Afterword

Appendix I: Chronology of Issues

Appendix II: Participants & Programme

More info →
The Celtic Connection

The Celtic Connection

£38.00

The Celtic nations of Brittany, Cornwall, Ireland, the Isle of Man, Scotland and Wales are well known for their literature, mythology, poetry and song. This volume is a study of the linguistic and literary achievements of those nations and provides a much-needed overview of the condition of all the Celtic languages. By emphasising the connection, these studies taken together illuminate the whole Celtic domain.

As the Editor points out, the Celtic identity is not one of race – the genetic links, if they are there at all, just cannot be proved – but it is of a common linguistic and cultural heritage. The Celtic Connection focuses on the similarities and differences in language across the Celtic nations and contributes to the resurgence of interest in the Celtic identity which is increasingly being supported by official bodies, both national and international.

The collection commences with a description of the languages and origins of early Celtic society. Each language is then examined by a leading expert in linguistics and literature. All the contributors have written their contributions keeping in mind the theme of the title – the extent to which links among the Celtic peoples have (or, indeed, have not) been significant.

Contents: The Celtic Languages (Glanville Price) – The Early Celts (Miranda J. Green) – The Irish Language (Máirtín Ó Murchú) – Early Irish Literature (Pádraig Ó Riain) – Post-Norman Irish Literature (Séamus Mac Mathúna) – The Scottish Gaelic Language (John MacInnes) – Scottish Gaelic Literature (Derek S. Thomson) – Manx Language and Literature (Robert L. Thomson) – The Welsh Language, Its History and Structure (David Thorne) – The Welsh Language (Glanville Price) – Welsh Literature (David R. Johnston) – The Breton Language (Humphrey Ll. Humphreys) – Breton Literature (Rita Williams) – Cornish Language and Literature (Glanville Price) – The Celtic Connection Today (Glanville Price). With a Foreword, 'Brittany and Myself', by Prince Louis de Polignac.

The Princess Grace Irish Library 6 More info →
Selected Plays of Micheál mac Liammóir

Selected Plays of Micheál mac Liammóir

£9.95
Chosen and Introduced by John Barrett

The eleventh volume of the Irish Drama Selections series (ISSN 0260-7962), General Editors: Joseph Ronsley and Ann Saddlemyer.

21.6 x 13.8 cm.   
Hardcopy ISBN: 0-86140-154-9 / 978-0-86140-154-3 £30.00
Paperback ISBN: 0-86140-155-7 / 978-0-86140-155-0 £9.95

Contains: Where Stars Walk, Ill Met by Moonlight, The Mountains Look Different, The Liar, Prelude in Kasbek Street, selected writings on plays and players, bibliographical checklist.

When he died in 1978, Ireland mourned the passing of the most versatile man of the theatre she has ever known. His acting career started early as a child actor in London, but when he was fourteen he read a single passage of Yeats extolling Ireland's heritage and from then on he was to give himself to the Dublin stage, notably the Gate Theatre which he founded with his partner, Hilton Edwards. John Barrett has mapped out the influences and achievements of this extraordinary character in his introduction and selected five of Macliamm¢ir's most memorable works.

John Barrett taught English at University College, Dublin.

  More info →