Genre: Poetry
The Poems of James Stephens

The Poems of James Stephens

£40.00
Edited by Shirley Mulligan
Introduction by A. Norman Jeffares

During the past decades there has been a substantial body of bibliographical, critical and biographical material published testifying to Stephens' significance as poet, novelist, essayist, and short story writer. There has been an edition of his Letters by Richard J. Finneran (1974) and a two volume Uncollected Prose edited by Patricia McFate (1983). In addition, some of his prose works have been reprinted (The Crock of Gold; Irish Fairy Tales; Deirdre and The Insurrection in Dublin are presently listed by Amazon.co.uk), so a volume of Stephens' poetry is long overdue.

At the present time it is virtually impossible to locate any volume of Stephens’ poetry outside a library. In the case of his Collected Poems (1954), even if one finds a copy, it is difficult to evaluate the poet's progress, influences, or interests at any given period since the poems are arranged thematically under charming but elusive titles which, for the most part, tell nothing about the contents or period of their composition, although we are at least fortunate that the last three books in that volume are chronologically arranged. Furthermore, over one hundred poems published in volumes, in magazines, or newspapers were omitted from the Collected Poems. A complete chronological collection of James Stephens' poetry is therefore necessary if readers are to be encouraged to enjoy and study his work in depth, and that is what the present editor provides.

This volume contains more than 320 poems by Stephens, a biographical and critical introduction by A. Norman Jeffares (his last work before his death in 2005), as well as notes, indexes to titles and first lines, and an Appendix listing those poems that appeared in the 1954 Collected Poems. It is an essential adjunct to the library of every lover of Irish poetry.

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Devil’s Wine

Devil’s Wine

£35.00
Author:
Genre: Poetry
Tag: Devil's Wine
ISBN: 978-0-86140-066-9 21.6 x 13.8 cm.   112 pp.   1980

Vernon Scannell, in Times Literary Supplement, wrote of Martin Booth's previous collection, Calling with Owls, that 'the poems carry a strong sense of real experience observed with clarity and expressed with force and unwavering truthfulness.' In this, his sixth collection, Booth revised all that he felt worth retaining  from his earlier books and to these has added new poems which continue to affirm that he was, as Robin Skelton, in Malahat Review, stated, 'the most interesting and challenging poet of his generation.'

Martin Booth (1944-2004) was poet, publisher (The Sceptre Press was well-known for its single poem volumes), novelist, and biographer.21.6 x 13.8 cm.   112 pp.   1980

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The Irish Poems of J.J.Callanan

The Irish Poems of J.J.Callanan

£8.99

Edited and introduced by Gregory A.Schirmer

Despite the relatively slender volume of his work and the obscurity that marked his brief life – he was known to his friends as ‘the  Recluse’ –  the Cork poet J. J. Callanan (1795-1829) has come to be recognised as one of the most significant Irish poets writing before Yeats.  Inspired equally by English romanticism and Ireland’s Gaelic culture, and drawing often on the life of Irish-speaking communities in West Cork, Callanan’s work negotiates with remarkable effect between Ireland’s two principal traditions, while giving voice to many of the cultural forces that were shaping Irish life in the early years of the nineteenth century.

Callanan’s poetry has been out of print since 1883.  The present selection brings together all his poems having to do with Ireland, including those for which he is best known – his poetic translations from the Irish, lyrics such as ‘Gougane Barra,’ and his long autobiographical poem, ‘The Recluse of Inchidony’. The poems are fully annotated, and original sources for the translations, where known, are given.  The introduction provides a detailed account of Callanan’s life, drawing in part on private letters and diaries, as well as a critical assessment of his poetry.  There is also an extensive bibliography that includes a listing of all critical writings about Callanan.

Gregory A. Schirmer divides his time between Oxford, Mississippi, where he is Professor of English at the University of Mississippi, and Skibbereen, West Cork. His publications include The Poetry of Austin Clarke (1983), William Trevor. A Study of His Fiction (1990), (editor) Reviews and Essays of Austin Clarke (1995), which includes a massive checklist of Clarke’s periodical writings, and Out of What Began: A History of Irish Poetry in English (1998).

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Sights and Sounds

Sights and Sounds

£12.99
Author:
Genre: Poetry
Tag: Sights and Sounds
38pp. 20.4cm hbk

The poems in the present collection are largely an attempt to put into words what is registered either in the mind, or when physically encountering the world around. But there are also reflections on what one experiences when looking back on the past.

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The Silence of Snow

The Silence of Snow

£12.99
Author:
Genre: Poetry
Tag: Silence of Snow
52pp.  20.4 cm.  2013 In a sequence of haunting poems the author has put down the random thoughts that reflected his sense of isolation and formed a barrier to keep him from thinking about the suffering of his dying partner, until he had to face the agony of the inevitable departure and reconcile himself to that parting. More info →
Footsteps

Footsteps

£12.99
Author:
Genre: Poetry
Tag: Footsteps
20.4cm 

In this latest short volume of poems, Jo Rippier shows how his love of nature has increased, developed and deepened through his recent volumes of poetry as he envies the arctic fox and admires precariously preserved idyllic landscapes. In 'Temporal', he fuses mortality and summer into an image of peacefully combined opposites. His description of the artistically observant church visitor's reaction, in 'Regarding a Church', creeping away 'uncomforted' and 'uncomfortable at registering expectations somehow unfulfilled' will remain a compelling image for the reader as it formulates that fleeting experience many people have without being able to say what it was that left them faintly uneasy.

A memorable collection, and as with Rippier's earlier volumes, one of Gerhard Elsner's superbly evocative watercolours decorates the dustjacket. More info →

Something Old, Something New

Something Old, Something New

£12.99
Jo Rippier was born in Plymouth in 1935, and educated at King’s School Worcester and Emmanuel College Cambridge. He gained his Ph.D. in English Literature at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitatät, where he was a lecturer in the English Department until retiring in 1998. His previous publications include The Short Stories of Sean O’Faolain: A Study in Descriptive Techniques,and Some Postwar English Novelists, a volume of short stories, Goodnight, Morning, and collections of poetry, Seasons & Remembrance, Beginnings, Endings, Past Present and Against the Stream. More info →
Late Motley

Late Motley

£12.99
Author:
Genre: Poetry
Tag: Late Motley

Jo Rippier was born in Plymouth in 1935, and educated at King’s School Worcester and Emmanuel College Cambridge. He gained his Ph.D. in English Literature at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitatät, where he was a lecturer in the English Department until retiring in 1998. His previous publications include The Short Stories of Sean O’Faolain: A Study in Descriptive Techniques,and Some Postwar English Novelists, a volume of short stories, Goodnight, Morning, and collections of poetry, Seasons & Remembrance, Beginnings, Endings, Past Present and Against the Stream.

Gerhard Elsner, whose illustration appears on the front cover, was born in Senftenberg, Germany, in 1930. He was educated at the Universities of Freiburg and Karlsruhe. He has a major reputation in Germany, with pictures in art museums and public buildings in Freiburg, Tübingen, Frankfurt, Konstanz and the Deutscher Bundestag in Berlin.

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Echoes and Reflections

Echoes and Reflections

£12.99
42pp.  20.4cm.     2009

This latest collection of poems by Jo Rippier reflect his love of the impact of the countryside and its scenery, of water, and of fishing, as well as childhood and school memories, and the memorials of war.

Jo Rippier was born in Plymouth in 1935, and educated at King’s School Worcester and Emmanuel College Cambridge. He gained his Ph.D. in English Literature at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitatät, where he was a lecturer in the English Department until retiring in 1998. His previous publications include The Short Stories of Sean O’Faolain: A Study in Descriptive Techniques,and Some Postwar English Novelists, a volume of short stories, Goodnight, Morning, and collections of poetry, Seasons & Remembrance, Beginnings, Endings, Past Present, Against the Stream and Late Motley.

Gerhard Elsner, who illustration appears on the front cover, was born in Senftenberg, Germany, in 1930. He was educated at the Universities of Freiburg and Karlsruhe. He has a major reputation in Germany, with pictures in art museums and public buildings in Freiburg, Tübingen, Frankfurt, Konstanz and the Deutscher Bundestag in Berlin.

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Against the Stream
The Oracle in the Heart

The Oracle in the Heart

£5.50 paperback
This collection contains poems written between 1974 and 1978. These are the works of a visionary in the lineage of Blake and Coleridge, Shelley and Yeats who invokes the ancient wisdom of this rich heritage. More info →
An Duanaire 1600-1900. Poems of the Dispossessed

An Duanaire 1600-1900. Poems of the Dispossessed

£13.99
ISBN: 978-0-85105-364-6
21.6 x 13.8 cm.  

with 38 illustrations.

The primary purpose of this anthology is to demonstrate the nature and quality of the Irish poetic tradition during the troubled centuries from the collapse of the Gaelic order to the emergence of English as the dominant vernacular of the Irish people. The English translations, all new, have aimed at a close fidelity to the content of the originals while suggesting something of the poetic quality and the basic rhythms of the original Irish poems More info →

Shadows

Shadows

£12.99
Author:
Genre: Poetry
Tag: Shadows
38pp. 20.4 cm.

The poems in the present collection are somewhat autumnal in mood, reflecting both personal and spontaneous reactions to the world around. Sometimes strange sightings provoke personal reflections on the difference between nature and the modern world, whilst also revealing unsuspected significance.

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The Wexford Carols

The Wexford Carols

£7.50
21.6 x 13.8 cm.  

The tradition of carol singing in County Wexford goes back to the seventeenth century and continues as a living tradition today in the parish of Kilmore. The repertoire derives from a little book of songs published by Luke Wadding in Ghent in 1684 and from a manuscript collection compiled by Father William Devereux in County Wexford in 1734, which has been copied several times and is still circulated in manuscript copies.

Diarmaid O Muirithe has assembled the twenty-one carols which exist in the Wadding book and later copies of the Devereux manuscript compiled by Michael Murphy and Richard Neil in the early nineteenth century, and here presents the first complete collection of these rare texts.

The traditional airs which are still sung today were recorded by the Kilmore singers, and from this recording Seoirse Bodley has transcribed the airs. He has also provided a commentary on the musical mode. 

   

Diarmaid O Muirithe is an authority on the Anglo-Norman culture of south-east Ireland and Seoirse Bodley is a composer of international repute.

The reproduction on the cover is a detail from a woodcut, ‘The Holy Family with two angels in a portico’ c. 1502, by Albrecht Dürer.

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Darkness and Light

Darkness and Light

£12.95
Author:
Genre: Poetry
Tag: Darkness and Light
54pp. 20.4 cm

The poems in this collection swing in mood from darkly serious to rather lighter tones, the emphasis being on reactions both to what is observed physically, and to associations aroused by single words or ideas. These can be extreme, as with 'Inside Belsen' or 'Brimstone'. Sometimes, as with 'John Lindley Has Died', a news story in a magazine can provoke an emotional response, as the mind attempts to come to terms with what the announcement has evoked. More info →

Georgian Dublin

Georgian Dublin

£4.99
Twenty-five Views in Colour Aquatint
ISBN: 978-0-85105-425-4

10.7 x 14.8 cm landscape    xi, [53] pp.     25 full colour prints

Georgian Dublin is a pocket-sized edition of Malton's superb colour aquatints which show Dublin city in its finest age – the period in which the present layout of the city emerged and during which many of its classical buildings were erected. These lively and colourful prints open a window to the past and reveal scene after scene which, with one exception, can still be visited today. The views range from the great courtyard of Dublin Castle, past Gandon's riverfront masterpieces, the Custom House and the Four Courts, to the simple street scene at Capel Street bridge, peopled with the Dubliners of two centuries ago.

Malton's work originally appeared in the final decade of the eighteenth century and was highly praised on publication. He wrote in his announcement of the work that he was 'struck with admiration at the beauty of the capital of Ireland and was anxious to make a display of it to the world'.

'the most splendid illustrated book on Dublin.'
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The Poems of J.M.Synge

The Poems of J.M.Synge

£6.99
Author:
Genre: Poetry
Tag: Poems of J.M.Synge
Edited by Robin Skelton

ISBN: 978-0-86140-058-4
xxxvi, 128 pp. 21.4 cm.

J.M.Synge died in 1909 and The Works of John M. Synge were published in four volumes by Maunsel & Co., Dublin, in 1910. Since that time, with the exception of a few minor verses and one or two fragments of prose, the canon of his work has remained unaltered. Nevertheless, much unpublished material exists, for the most part of great interest and significance for the understanding of Synge's methods of work and development. This material, including early drafts of the plays, notebooks, poems, and fragments of poetic drama, has now been thoroughly explored in order to create this definitive edition, first published by Oxford University Press 1962-68, which not only collects together all that is of significance in his printed and in his unprinted work, but also, by a careful use of worksheets and early drafts, indicates much of the process of creation which occurred before the production of the printed page.

The Collected Works is in four volumes, under the general editorship of the late Professor Robin Skelton, of the University of Victoria, British Columbia, who begins the series with his edition of the poems and translations, in which he has more than doubled the canon of Synge's verse. The prefaces by W. B. Yeats and Synge to the first, Cuala Press, edition are also included. The late Dr Alan Price, of The Queen's University, Belfast, edited the prose and Professor Ann Saddlemyer of Victoria College, University of Toronto, has edited the plays, published in two volumes. These volumes were published by arrangement with Oxford University Press.

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Poets and Dreamers

Poets and Dreamers

£30.00
General Editors of the Coole Edition: T. R. Henn CBE and Colin Smythe

With a Foreword by T. R. Henn

ISBN: 978-0-900675-35-5
Studies and Translations from the Irish, including nine plays by Douglas Hyde

22.7 x 13.8 cm.  286 pp.    illus.  1974   Volume 11 of the Coole Edition of Lady Gregory's works In Poets and Dreamers Lady Gregory has gathered together a number of essays and translations she had made from the Irish of Douglas Hyde, An Craoibhin Aoibhinn, ‘the Sweet Little Branch’, who was founder and President of the Gaelic League at the time and later to be the first President of the Republic of Ireland.

Lady Gregory has also written about other poets in this volume, notably Raftery, who was the model for Yeats’s Red Hanrahan, and also writes about West Irish ballads, and those by Jacobite and Boer and that beautiful poem by the expatriate Shemus Cartan, ‘A Sorrowful Lament for Ireland’.

Her other essays are covered by the Dreamers part of the title, ‘Mountain Theology’, ‘Herb Healing’ and ‘Workhouse Dreams’ among them. This edition contains a further five plays by Hyde, translated by Lady Gregory, three of which have not hitherto been published.

The Ap­pendices contain a number of early versions of poems and articles and includes ‘Dreams that have no moral’ by W. B. Yeats. This has been added from his Celtic Twilight (1902) as an Appendix in order to give an example as to how Lady Gregory worked together with him in providing him with material for his volumes. Lady Gregory refers to the story in ‘Workhouse Dreams’.

The Editors have also added a quant­ity of her revisions and an essay, ‘Cures by Charms’, which first appeared in the Westminster Budget with two of the other essays in this volume, but which was not included in the first edition.

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Nightingales: Poems 1985 – 1996

Nightingales: Poems 1985 – 1996

£95.00

xii, 108pp., 28.5 x 18.7 cm.   1997

To mark the first twenty years as Francis Warner's publisher, years which included our publication of thirteen books by him (as well as a number of books about his work), and to mark his sixtieth birthday Colin Smythe Ltd. published this volume containing poems written since those published in Collected Poems 1960-1984, together with lyrics from his recent plays.

This book, Nightingales: Poems 1985-1996, is designed by Michael Mitchell, set in Lutetia Italic type, and printed in three colours throughout and embellished with real gold-leaf motifs in a limited edition of 500 signed and numbered copies on mould-made Velin Arches rag paper by the Libanus Press, Marlborough. It is bound by Brian Settle of Smith Settle, Otley, in quarter vellum with boards covered by paste paper made by Victoria Hall of Norwich.

The Libanus Press was founded by designer and printer Michael Mitchell thirty years ago. Working together with two highly-skilled journeymen, compositor and printer, the Press reflects all the splendid qualities of such presses as William Morris's Kelmscott Press and St John Hornby's Ashendene Press. It uses three relief presses and has maintained one of the few remaining type foundries in the country allowing it to produce high quality type for each individual work. Its range and knowledge of the world's best handmade papers gives it the broadest experience of print on the most interesting and beautiful materials, and has persevered with nearly lost techniques, such as the printed application of gold leaf used in the present volume. Numbered amongst the books produced by the Press in the past have been a series of dual text publications - a new translation of Plato's Symposium that is now the contemporary benchmark, Voltaire's Candide, The Letters of Pietro Bembo to Lucrezia Borgia and Extracts from War and Peace - Greek, French, Italian and Russian, giving it unparalleled editorial and design expertise with texts.

‘What a triumphant harvest!’ Dr George Rylands, King’s College,Cambridge

‘A sumptuous treat. It is good to have an unashamedly lyric poet of such talent.’ The Bishop of Oxford

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The Poems And Plays of Oliver St John Gogarty

The Poems And Plays of Oliver St John Gogarty

£50.00
Collected, edited and annotated by A. Norman Jeffares

23.5 x 15.5 cm.     xxxii, 861 pp.  2001
ISBN: 978-0-86140-404-9

Poems and Plays brings together the contents of Oliver St John Gogarty’s fifteen volumes of poetry, including his Collected Poems. It also contains poems published individually in various journals and 232 hitherto unpublished poems; as well, there are his three Abbey plays – Blight, A Serious Thing and The Enchanted Trousers – published under the nom-de-plume Gideon Ouseley, together with Incurables and the incomplete Wavelengths.

Much of Gogarty’s poetry was classically inspired; his witty lyric poems have the elegant grace of Herrick or the terse eloquence of Marvell. His appreciative poems about his friends and his elegies for some of them are balanced by Martial-like satires; his enthusiastic enjoyment of beauty is matched by the encomiastic treatment of places, itself reinforced by a keen awareness of their historical and often dramatic associations.

Gogarty, the son and grandson of doctors, was born in Dublin in 1878. His novel, Tumbling in the Hay (1939; 1996) gives a sparkling account of medical student life in Dublin at the beginning of the twentieth century. When he was an undergraduate at Trinity College, Dublin, Gogarty was befriended by the famous classical dons Tyrrell and Mahaffy and the philosopher Macran. At the same time he had a circle of contemporaries (many met earlier when he was briefly a student at University College, Dublin) known for their raffish behaviour and mocking, bawdy wit; among them were James Joyce, John (‘Citizen’) Elwood and Vincent Cosgrave. James Starkey (‘Seumas O’Sullivan’) was another contemporary companion. And Gogarty’s acquaintanceship widened to include George Moore and W.B.Yeats who, despite thirteen years difference in age, became a lifelong friend.

An all-round athlete who was a champion cyclist, who successfully rescued drowning men on three occasions, Gogarty followed up his medical degree with a spell of study in Vienna, returning to become a successful Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist in Dublin. His lively autobiographical As I was going down Sackville Street (1937; 1994) records something of the entertaining eccentricity of many of the city’s citizens in the 1920s as well as the characters of those involved in its cultural and political life.

Gogarty’s wit irradiated his exuberant conversation. Many of his Rabelaisian poems have remained unpublished until now. They circulated freely, however, in the talk of Dublin, especially among the group who met in Fanning’s public house or the Bailey, such fellow wits as George Redding and Neil Montgomery.

Gogarty, whose politically active friends included Arthur Griffith, Michael Collins and Michael Cusack, became a Senator of the Irish Free State. Kidnapped by the I.R.A. in the Irish Civil War in 1923, he escaped being shot by plunging into the River Liffey and swimming downstream to safety. Renvyle, his large house in Connemara, bought when he realised that cars made it more accessible from Dublin (he was an enthusiastic early motorist and Ireland’s first amateur aviator) was burnt down by the I.R.A. shortly afterwards. When it was rebuilt in 1930 Gogarty turned it into a hotel. There, as in Dublin, he and his wife entertained generously, their circle of friends ever-widening.

As he moved away from medicine Gogarty sold his Dublin house, 15 Ely Place, finding more time for writing in Connemara. In 1939 he went on a lecture tour in the United States and, disillusioned by de Valera’s Ireland, stayed on, supporting himself and his family (there were two sons and a daughter) in Ireland, by writing and lecturing. He came back at intervals, transport permitting, but died in New York in 1957, the year that he had decided to return permanently to Ireland.

Now that his work is being made available again, readers have the opportunity to appreciate the lively evocative writings of this Renaissance man whose poetry W.B.Yeats so admired, including more of Gogarty’s work in his Oxford Book of Modern Verse 1892-1935 than of any other living poet. His poetry conveys his infective love of beauty of all kinds, the fundamental seriousness beneath his witty persiflage, his moving awareness of Time’s inexorable pressures, and his emphasis upon the need to face death with dignity.

The collection is divided under the headings chosen by Gogarty himself for Collected Poems

Part 1 - Collected Poems (1951): Odes and Addresses - Earth and Sea - Satires and Facetiae - Love and Beauty -Life and Death - Elegies.

Part 2: Poems in Various Volumes - published and unpublished, not included in Collected Poems. Hyperthuleana (1916), Secret Springs of Dublin Song (1918), The Ship and Other Poems (1918), An Offering of Swans (1923), An Offering of Swans and Other Poems (1924), Wild Apples (1928, 1929, 1930), Selected Poems (1933), Others to Adorn (1938), Elbow Room (1939), Perennial (1944, 1946), Unselected Poems (1954), Penultimate Poems (prepared but unpublished).

Part 3: Poems published in journals and unpublished volumes. Odes and Addresses - Earth and Sea - Satires and Facetiae (Dislikes and Disapprobations, Limericks, Parodies, Light-hearted Verses, Some Martello Tower Poems, Seamus O’Sullivan Poems, Poems concerning Dermot Freyer, Jesting about the Sinclair Brothers, Classical Themes, Religious Thoughts, Political Poems, On Drinking, Medical Meditations, Monto Poems) - Love and Beauty -Life and Death - Elegies.

Appendices, Notes, Notes on the texts, and Addenda, including ‘Delphi’, written as an entry for the Newdigate Prize.

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