George Gissing at Work: A Study of His Notebook ‘Extracts from my Reading’

George Gissing at Work: A Study of His Notebook ‘Extracts from my Reading’

£25.00

This volume sheds new light on Gissing's intellectual process and methods of work. Over 160 quotations which he recorded in his notebook reveal themes and passions which profoundly interested him. His novels are increasingly valued for their candour about nineteenth century social problems such as the status of women and the condition of the working class.

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Rediscovering Herbert Horne: Poet, Architect, Typographer, Art Historian

Rediscovering Herbert Horne: Poet, Architect, Typographer, Art Historian

£25.00
22.5 x 14.8 cm.

Herbert Horne (1864-1916) was a figure of alarming versatility: poet, architect, editor, essayist, typographer, designer of books, and the first scientific historian of art from the British Isles. His great book on Botticelli has been called by John Pope-Hennessy "the best monograph in English on an Italian painter." Horne's splendid editorship of the Century Guild Hobby Horse led Bernard Berenson and others to hail him as the successor of William Morris. Horne the connoisseur also gathered a choice selection of drawings and paintings which await closer appreciation. They are housed in his residence, now the Museo Horne, Florence, Italy.

In spite of his achievements he passes unmentioned in the Dictionary of National Biography, and aside from distinguished but brief discussions of his art activities by Fritz Sax and Frank Kermode, no book-length study has been devoted to him: until now.

Rediscovering Herbert Horne is Ian Fletcher's last book. Well known in the United States and Europe for his highly original scholarship, Fletcher provides an engaging account of the work of one of the more fascinating though elusive personages of the time. In his foreword, Peter Stansky says "Ian Fletcher has now presented us with a rich picture of Horne, in all the multiplicity of his talents and accomplishments."

Reproductions of Horne's designs and typography assist in effecting the re-emergence of this intriguing 1880-1920 figure.

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J.M.Barrie, An Annotated Secondary Bibliography

J.M.Barrie, An Annotated Secondary Bibliography

£35.00
22.8 x 15.2 cm.   xxvi, 440 pp.       1989

Sir James Matthew Barrie (1860-1937) is cherished interna­tionally for his delightful children’s tale Peter Pan, reprised in numer­ous forms as play, musical, and animated film.

Yet Barrie’s contribution to English literature carries far beyond his Immortal Peter Pan. He estab­lished a following as an essayist, achieved great success as a novelist, then turned from the novel to even greater successes in the theatre. There, decades later, works such as The Admirable Crichton and What Every Woman Knows were still being applauded in London’s West End and on Broadway, subse­quently pleasing even larger audi­ences in their film and television versions.

As a successful playwright, Barrie Joined his efforts with those of Bernard Shaw and Harley Granville Barker in helping to establish the ‘theatre of the play­wright’, a movement which revo­lutionised theatrical production by effectively breaking the strangle­hold grip of the old ‘star system’ and revitalised the British theatre during the first decade of this century.

Professor Markgraf has assidu­ously compiled and annotated over 5,000 items relevant to Barrie’s life and work. For decades to come this bibliography will be an essential source of research, not only for scholars who pursue Barrie’s career but for those interested in the era in which he worked.

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Arthur Symons: A Bibliography

Arthur Symons: A Bibliography

£35.00
Arthur Symons (1865-1945), now widely regarded as the most important critic of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, is best known for his seminal work, The Symbolist Movement in Literature (1900). Shortly after Symons's mental breakdown in 1908, his close friend W. B. Yeats called him ‘the best critic of his generation’ and in 1957, Frank Kermode, in Romantic Image, referred to Symons as a ‘crucial’ figure in the development of Modernism, ‘always at the centre of his period and herald of its successor’.

One of the most prolific writers of his time, Symons produced some 60 volumes and pamphlets of poetry and prose; edited, introduced, or contributed poetry and prose to scores of volumes; wrote over 1300 articles and reviews for periodicals and newspapers; and translated works by such noted writers as Zola, Baudelaire, Verhaeren, Verlaine, Villiers de 1'Isle-Adam, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Casanova, Alexandre Dumas fils, and d’Annunzio.

Until now, such vast productivity has never been fully accounted for and bibliographically described. Karl Beckson, Ian Fletcher, Lawrence W. Markert, and John Stokes – all specialists in the 1880-1920 period and all having previously published on Arthur Symons – have collaborated on this comprehensive bibliography to produce a scholarly and reliable reference work that will provide little known details of Symons's immense oeuvre. This book will remain an indispensable source of research for decades to come. ISBN: 978-0-944318-04-1 More info →

Pater in the 1990s

Pater in the 1990s

£29.50
ISBN: 978-0-944318-05-8

Walter Pater (1839-1894) was one of the Transition Era's most influential figures. In this collection of essays, distinguished scholars continue research into his life. Subjects are included for the apprentice as well as the expert: from a scandal during Pater's Oxford days, to the influences upon him by Wordsworth and Arnold, and in turn to his influence upon Hopkins and Joyce. Contributors include: Billie A. Inman, Gerald Monsman, J.P. Ward, Lesley Higgins, F.C. McGrath, Paul Tucker, Richard Dellamora, Hayden Ward, J.B. Bullen, M.F. Moran, Bernard Richards, Anne Varty, Jane Spirit.

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The Selected Prose of John Gray

The Selected Prose of John Gray

£30.00
Edited by Jerusha Hull McCormack

Publication of Ian Fletcher’s The Poems of John Gray (1988) was welcomed by reviewers in the U.S. and England. Now ELT Press offers a companion vol­ume, The Selected Prose of John Gray.

It complements the poetry by printing essays and short stories chosen from different periods of Gray's life – some selections previously unpublished, others having appeared only in limited periodical circulation.

This new book adds to our understanding of Gray and topics relevant to the era. Professor McCormack explains the importance of the prose in her introduction: ‘Gray has a significance for his time as a writer who has made the transition from the mannered decadence of “The Modem Actor" to the cryptic pre-modernist narrative of Park (1932). As such, his work helps us recon­struct our own past: in particular, it requires us to acknowledge that abyss which lies between the late Victorian and the years after the Great War. As one who survived, not only personally but as a writer, Gray allows us to speculate on the strategies by which he sought to bridge that chasm. And in so doing, John Gray's work may provide an example of how, on the edge of greater chasms, we may still presume to tell stories and to feel, in telling them, that they are permitted to tell us something about our experience – and ourselves.’

Professor McCormack traces the development of Gray’s life and writings in her introductory essay. She prefaces each selection with a useful headnote. Her extensive notes to the prose clarify topical allusions and make Gray’s work accessible to a wide audience.

Jerusha Hull McCormack, University College Dublin, is author of John Gray: Poet, Dandy, and Priest (University Press of New England, 1991).

Design: The book is typeset in Joanna, the stunning typeface Eric Gill designed especially for the Sheed & Ward 1932 edition of Park. Nineteen illustrations are reproduced from original printings of Gray’s writings. ELT Press’s David Schwartz has designed 14 beautifully hand-drawn initial letters for the prose. (For details on the illustrations and typography, see pages ix—x, page 316).

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The Poetry of Henry Newbolt: Patriotism is Not Enough

The Poetry of Henry Newbolt: Patriotism is Not Enough

£30.00
22.9 x 15.3 cm.

Henry Newbolt (1862-1938) was a celebrated man of letters at the turn of the century: poet, essayist, historian. But his popularity ebbed after the Great War, and since then the man and his poetry have received more than their share of hostile criticism. Even today critics oversimplify Newbolt. Most often he is typecast as the leading jingoist of the Edwardian age, not unlike Rudyard Kipling was until recently.

In The Poetry of Henry Newbolt, Vanessa Furse Jackson gives us a fresh look at the man, his poetry and their historical context. Her discussions of his heroic and lyric poems are framed by a close examination of the institutionalised values that lay behind Newbolt’s popularity. She looks at the intimate ties between his life-code and his education, particularly his public school education, and at the pervasive concepts of heroism, chivalry and patriotism inherited by the younger generation of the 1870s. She later examines how traditional Victorian and Edwardian attitudes, not just the general public’s but Newbolt’s as well, were irrevocably altered by the gruesome events of World War I.

Jackson provides nuance and perspective to show that Newbolt was not simply the blind patriot described by many literary historians. What he represents, she says, ‘is something much more interesting, and, in a complete history of the period, both more important and more complex.’ In addition to revealing much about the concepts, ideals and aspirations of the Victorian middle class in which he grew up, Newbolt ‘represents one of the last movements in poetry to occur in the fin-de-siècle anticipation and anxiety of the 1890s. [He] is a minor figure who represents major Victorian values and attitudes.’

In The Poetry of Henry Newbolt, Professor Jackson reconnects the poems to their context and offers new insights into Henry Newbolt, his work, and the Transi¬tion era itself.

VANESSA FURSE JACKSON, a great-granddaughter of Henry Newbolt, spent ten years in theatre in England before returning to college in 1981 and completing a BA (hons) in Related Arts at the West Sussex Institute of Higher Education. After graduating in 1984, she came to the United States and received an MFA in Creative Writing at Bowling Green State Uni¬versity in 1986. She completed her Ph.D. at Bowling Green in 1990. Professor Jackson spent her time teaching at Texas A & M University – Corpus Christi, before returning to live in England.

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Gaston de Latour: The Revised Text

Gaston de Latour: The Revised Text

£38.00
Edited by Gerald Monsman

ISBN: 978-0-944318-09-6
22.6 x 14.8 cm     384 pp.             1995

This is the most complete edition ever published of Pater's last work. Although a version was published in 1896, two years after his death, Charles L.Shadwell, its editor, omitted six chapters that existed in manuscript.

Scarcely two years after Walter Pater's death, Macmillan & Company published Gaston de Latour: An Unfinished Romance. The author of works critical to the formation of the Transition and Modernist periods set his last novel in the turbulent years following the Reformation. Selected chapters first appeared serially in Macmillan's Magazine and the Fortnightly Review, but the posthumous volume edited by Charles L. Shadwell, Pater's long-time friend, remains controversial. For a century readers have seen only a portion of what Pater wrote for Gaston de Latour. Shadwell withheld six manuscript chapters.

Pater's prominence and widening influence in late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century studies makes those missing chapters more intriguing than ever. ELT Press is pleased to publish this long-awaited new edition Gaston de Latour: The Revised Text.

Edited from the holographs and based on definitive material incorporating all known fragments, The Revised Text includes the crucial suppressed chapters. Professor Gerald Monsman's edition, meticulously edited and researched, is far more revelatory of Pater's intimate thoughts than the book Macmillan printed in 1896.

The Revised Text is notable in other ways. Pater's study of eroticism in his portrait of Queen Marguerite is a significant contribution to gender studies in the late-Victorian period. Through the imaginary portrait of Gaston and Gaston's contemporaries (Ronsard, Montaigne, Bruno, King Henry III) Pater's fictional fantasia perceptively confronts and admonishes the Yellow Nineties, Oscar Wilde not least. As Monsman says, the Pater of the 1890s, pondering the issues of art and morality, eroticism and guilt, "is in may ways the most interesting of all the successive Paters – certainly wearier, but also more candid, consummately polished artistically, self-consciously aware of a dawning modernism."

Gerald Monsman is a Professor of English at the University of Arizona and former Head of the Department. He has worked for nearly a decade to bring this authoritative edition to print. His contributions to the field are well known. Among other publications, he has written three books on Pater: Pater's Portraits (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1967), Walter Pater (G. K. Hall, 1977), Walter Pater's Art of Autobiography (Yale University Press, 1980).

Gaston de Latour: The Revised Text is a significant achievement. Scholars and students will find Monsman's Introduction, Explanatory Notes, Diplomatic Transcriptions, Emendations and Variants invaluable.

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Walter Pater, ‘Gaston de Latour’: The Revised Text

Walter Pater, ‘Gaston de Latour’: The Revised Text

£38.00
Author:
Series: 1880-1920 British Authors Series, Book 10
Genre: Fiction

Scarcely two years after Walter Pater's death, Macmillan & Company published Gaston de Latour; An Unfinished Romance. The author of works critical to the formation of the Transition and Modernist periods set his last novel in the turbulent years following the Reformation. Selected chapters first appeared serially in Macmillan's Magazine and Fortnightly Review, but the posthumous volume edited by Charles L. Shadwell, Pater's long-time friend, remains controversial. For a century readers have seen only a portion of what Pater wrote for Gaston de Latour. Shadwell withheld six manuscript chapters.

Pater's prominence and widening influence in late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century studies makes those unpublished chapters more intriguing than ever. Edited from the holographs and based on definitive material incorporating all known fragments, The Revised Text includes the crucial suppressed chapters. Professor Gerald Monsman's edition, meticulously edited and researched, is surely closer to Pater's own latest version. This comprehensive Gaston de Latour offers what many will see as a work closer to Pater's intention than the book Macmillan printed in 1896.

The Revised Text is notable in other ways, Pater's study of eroticism in his portrait of Queen Marguerite is a significant contribution to gender studies in the late-Victorian period. The Pater of the 1890s is revealed here too. As Monsman says, the “later Pater is in many ways the most interesting of all the successive Paters – certainly wearier, but also more candid, consummately polished artistically, self-consciously aware of a dawning modernism."

Gerald Monsman (University of Arizona) has worked for nearly a decade to bring this authoritative edition to print. His contributions to the field are well known: Pater’s Portraits (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1967), Walter Pater (G. K. Hall, 1977), Walter Pater’s Art of Autobiography (Yale University Press, 1980). Gaston de Latour: The Revised Text is a significant achievement. Scholars and students will find Monsman's Introduction, Explanatory Notes, Diplomatic Transcriptions, Emendations and Variants invaluable.

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A Reader’s Guide to Dorothy Richardson’s ‘Pilgrimage’

A Reader’s Guide to Dorothy Richardson’s ‘Pilgrimage’

£27.00
Over the years, Pilgrimage (1915-1967) has been viewed as early Modernism's great documentary novel, as daring experimental fiction, as spiritual autobiography and pioneer of cinematographic technique. No matter what critical viewpoint readers use, Pilgrimage's reputation as a demanding text persists. Like James Joyce's Ulysses, Richardson's 2000 intricately woven pages have challenged readers for decades.

She explores a new way of presenting reality in Pilgrimage, one that is immediate rather than retrospective. As the resulting chronicle of events extends itself, however, the larger picture grows puzzling. Scenes change suddenly, characters spring from the long forgotten past, years disappear without a trace. A Reader's Guide meets these difficulties with a detailed account of the time scheme of the narrative, and a precise chronology of events keyed to the novels by page number for easy reference. Relationships among the principal persons of the story are followed throughout, and all the characters are placed in context in an alphabetically arranged descriptive directory. The book concludes with a select annotated secondary bibliography.

Thomson's practical scholarship bridges the ruptures and absences in Richardson's narrative to help readers master Pilgrimage in its broader outlines, in its structure, time-scheme, and character relations. Kristin Bluemel, author of Experimenting on the Borders of Modernism: Dorothy Richardson's 'Pilgrimage' (University of Georgia, 1996), aptly captures Thomson's achievement: "A Reader's Guide to Dorothy Richardson's 'Pilgrimage' does more than serve as a long-awaited reference tool; it also reminds us of the way Richardson's luminous multi-volume novel participates, despite or even because of all its difficulties of time, in the ongoing debates about the critical practices and literary priorities of modernity." More info →

The Dialectics of Sense and Spirit in Pater and Joyce

The Dialectics of Sense and Spirit in Pater and Joyce

£27.50

Modernist scholars have written a handful of comparative studies on Peter and Joyce. This work is the first book-length exploration into the aesthetic development of these writers that underscores the importance of Pater's work in Joyce's works. Much of Pater's and Joyce's aesthetics evolves from the dialectical tension between the sensual and the spiritual. The Paterian-Joycean syntheses of basic antinomies - religion and sensuality, empiricism and idealism, Aristotelian mimesis and aestheticism - result in kindred theories of art.

Moliterno's highly readable account of the intellectual affinity between the two authors searches their relationship and Joyce's potential debt to Pater. In four main chapters Moliterno discusses the transition of Pater and Joyce from priests to artist and the parallel ways they portray this process in fiction: traces the Paterian elements of the aesthetics of Stephen Dedalus and of the mature Joyce; compares Pater's epiphanies with Joyce's to reveal how Pater helped shape the Joycean epiphany; and analyses the similar epistemologies behind the development of Pater's and Joyce's aesthetics.

To some they may seem an odd match. Joyce, who sought to mirror the everyday lives of Dubliners through revolutionary literary techniques, appears to have little in common in Pater, the precious "father of aestheticism", precursor of Wilde and other aesthete who detested the mimesis Joyce championed. As Moliterno's book reveals, Pater has more in common with Joyce in this regard than with the aesthetes of the fin de siècle.

The Dialectics of Sense and Spirit in Pater and Joyce carefully discriminates connections between one of the late nineteenth century's most influential writers and the early twentieth century's master novelist.

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Notes on Pilgrimage: Dorothy Richardson Annotated

Notes on Pilgrimage: Dorothy Richardson Annotated

£35.00

Dorothy Richardson's thirteen-volume Pilgrimage is crowded with references from the last decade of the Victorian era and the first decade of the twentieth century. The interests of the protagonist Miriam Henderson are wide-ranging, from ecology to economics, from fiction to philosophy, from the mores of the family to the morals of the nation. Pilgrimage's stream-of-consciousness narrative evokes these references and interests in elusive, complex ways. Even accomplished readers, following in the wake of the heroine's personal revelations, are hard-pressed to understand aspects of the more public scene from turn-of-the-century England.

Notes on 'Pilgrimage', by identifying historical persons, events, ideas, quotations and writings that underpin Richardson's story, illuminates these factual details and enriches understanding of the narrative. A translation of all foreign words and phrases, a record of textual misprints and a thorough index add to the value of the book.

Professor Thomson has for many years studied one of British literature's most challenging, most rewarding, most underestimated masterpieces. Notes on 'Pilgrimage': Dorothy Richardson Annotated is the culmination of that splendid research.

This new book complements Thomson's 1996 A Reader's Guide to Dorothy Richardson's 'Pilgrimage', an account of the time scheme and a precise chronology of events, with characters placed in context through a descriptive directory. Together Notes on 'Pilgrimage' and A Reader's Guide to Dorothy Richardson's 'Pilgrimage' make a lasting contribution to the study of Dorothy Richardson and will be asked for by students and scholars for decades to come.

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Hugh Clifford and the Discipline of English Literature in the Straits Settlements and Malaya 1895-1907

Hugh Clifford and the Discipline of English Literature in the Straits Settlements and Malaya 1895-1907

£20.00
The first volume in the MODERN SUBJECTS/COLONIAL TEXTS  series
22.9 x 15.3 cm.     viii, 192 pp.   

Fiction written under colonialism at the turn of the nineteenth century continues to be a highly contested area of intellectual enquiry. Writers who put imperialism into focus – Rudyard Kipling, Rider Haggard, Joseph Conrad – are now also seen as important agents in creating and reinforcing notions of national culture and gender roles. Much recent colonial discourse analysis, however, has neglected writers who were part of colonial communities in favour of metropolitan travellers and visitors.

Hugh Clifford’s position as both colonial official and writer sets him apart from such contemporaries. His career as colonial administrator in the Malaya and Straits Settlements spanned five decades, and his Malayan short stories, novels and sketches draw an elaborate series of parallels between the act of governing the colony and the discipline of writing a literary text. In Modern Subjects/Colonial Texts Philip Holden places Clifford’s writing in the context of the British "Forward Movement" in the Malay Peninsula, the evolving strategies of colonial governance, and their reception and reinscription by colonial elites.

What makes Holden’s study especially interesting is his careful analysis not only of Clifford’s unique role as administrator and writer, but his probing of Clifford’s doubts about the colonial enterprise. The central contradiction of colonialism pervades his fiction. In its late nineteenth-century guise colonialism promised improvement and the uplifting of subject peoples, yet it could not admit them to a position of social equality since at that moment the basis for colonialism would vanish. Holden reveals how the experience as a colonial administrator made Clifford suspicious of the economic expediency which often underlies the rhetoric of mission and duty. Clifford also comes to have doubts about the success of masculinity as a practice of the regulation of the self. As the last chapter of Holden's study shows, such doubts and contradictions were exploited in the reception of Clifford's texts by colonial elites such as the Straits Chinese.

Interweaving constructions of masculinity, femininity, race, bodily purity in Clifford’s fiction and their reinscription by non-European bourgeois communities create a complex mixture of complicity and resistance, one Holden believes might find surprising affinities with our own world at the turn of the twentieth century.

PHILIP HOLDEN is Assistant Professor of Literature and Drama at the National Institute of Education, Singapore. He is author of Orienting Masculinity, Orienting Nation: W. Somerset Maugham's Exotic Fiction, and a number of articles on colonial and postcolonial writing and culture in journals such as ARIEL, Journal of Commonwealth Literature, Jouvert, and Communal/Plural. With his co-editor Richard Ruppell, he is editing a volume of essays provisionally entitled Queer Theory, Colonial Texts for publication by University of Minnesota Press.

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Oscar Wilde, Recent Research

Oscar Wilde, Recent Research

£39.00
A Supplement to Oscar Wilde Revalued.

Oscar Wilde Revalued, published by ELT Press in 1993, earned praise from Wilde scholars in the USA and Europe. Now, at the centenary of Wilde’s death, Professor Small’s 1993 book is succeeded by a completely new work, one that will also become essential for students of Wilde.

Oscar Wilde: Recent Research updates and reconceptualises the bibliographic objectives of the earlier volume, and surveys research on Wilde from 1992 to 2000, but in a much more explicitly evaluative manner.

The opening chapter, ‘Wilde in the 1990s’, traces the main directions of Wilde research over the past decade. Critical material is then reviewed under three broad categories. The first, ‘Biography’, is concerned with the continuing fascination with Wilde’s life, and its emphasis on how critics have moved on from dissatisfaction with Richard Ellmann’s Oscar Wilde (1987).

‘Recent Critical Paradigms’ evaluates research channelled through master-narratives that have emerged in the 1990s, ways of describing Wilde’s work: the ‘gay’ Wilde, the ‘Irish’ Wilde, and ‘Wilde and Consumerism’. ‘Wilde the Writer’, the third category, centres on an important trend in research during the last decade, what might be thought the less glamorous aspects of the oeuvre – from the seriousness with which Wilde took his role as a poet, to the sheer amount of time he devoted to writing journalism, to the complexities of the production and staging of his plays.

Oscar Wilde: Recent Research also contains sections devoted to sources and intertexts, to thematic studies, to essay collections, and to critical monographs which take Wilde as their sole subject. The book includes information about new research resources, and about manuscript discoveries and letters. It concludes with an extensive bibliography organised alphabetically and in terms of Wilde’s works, and an index of critics.

IAN SMALL has a personal chair in English literature at the University of Birmingham. He has written widely on a variety of literary figures and topics in the 1880-1920 era. He is co-general editor of the Oxford English Texts edition of The Complete Works of Oscar Wilde. Among his many publications are Oscar Wilde’s Profession: Writing and the Culture Industry in the Late Nineteenth Century (with Josephine M.Guy, OUP, 2000); Oscar Wilde Revalued (ELT Press, 1993); Politics and Value in English Studies: A Discipline in Crisis? (with Jacqueline M.Guy, CUP, 1993), and Conditions for Criticism (OUP, 1991).

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Kipling’s America: Travel Letters, 1889-1895

Kipling’s America: Travel Letters, 1889-1895

£30.00

 22.9 x 15.3 cm.         

Rudyard Kipling claimed that he never wrote 'the bland drivel of the globetrotter'. As a journalist for seven years in India, he watched tourists scurry across the land and then publish their superficial impressions. Ironically over the course of his life, Kipling too became a tourist, visiting and describing six continents.

Kipling was just twenty-three years old when he reached San Francisco in May 1889; he immediately began recording the sights and sounds of boom-town America. For four months he toured the United States, publishing accounts of his journey in the Pioneer, a major newspaper in western India. A few years later, when he lived in Vermont (1892-1896) with his American wife, Kipling wrote several syndicated articles published in both England and the U.S. Then in 1899 he revised and abridged the Pioneer versions and published them in From Sea to Sea. The second series of syndicated articles he collected in Letters of Travel (1920). Most of these travel writings are now out of print.

In Kipling's America, Professor D. H. Stewart brings all of these articles together and reproduces the original printed versions; he sets the context with an engaging introduction and helpful annotations. Readers are provided with the opportunity to hear again Kipling at his cocky and often opinionated best. From Kipling's perspective, America unleashed the chaotic energy latent in human beings, and he was uncertain whether this energy inevitably would be productive or destructive.

That some of his impressions were one-dimensional is undeniable, but equally undeniable is his gift of language—his access to a ready lexicon often composed of what he termed a 'perpetual Pentecost' to describe the 'talking in tongues' heard in British Overseas Clubs throughout the Empire. This hodgepodge of European languages (counter-pointed with pidgin English, Chinese, Hindi, American) produced a symphony (or cacophony) of bountiful word play deployed in his fiction and journalism. While some may see it as unsettling, a kind of 'Kiplingo', most will enjoy the virtuoso prose performances.

The accounts in Kipling’s America: Travel Letters, 1889-1895, reminiscent of a photograph album from a century past and shrewdly prophetic of today’s America, will intrigue Kipling scholars, students of American history and general readers alike.

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Eastern Questions. Hellenism and Orientalism in the Writings of E. M. Forster and Constantine Cavafy

Eastern Questions. Hellenism and Orientalism in the Writings of E. M. Forster and Constantine Cavafy

£25.00

What is the relationship between E. M. Forster’s quintessentially British novels, stories and essays and the abstrusely historical and erotic musings of the Greek poet C. P. Cavafy? The answer is both complex and illuminating.

The apparent differences are bridged by Forster’s penchant for antiquities and interest in matters Oriental, by Cavafy’s Anglophilia and British education. While these facts have generated comparative criticism that places novelist and poet in a Hellenistic continuum, the scholarly discussion to date has overlooked the ideological tensions that separate these two important modernists along a cultural divide. Hellenism is a way into their shared interests in the classical past, yet it also marks a point of dissension regarding the essence of Greek civilization. Similarly, their Orientalist visions led them to radically diverse configurations of the East.

Dr. Jeffreys’s parallel reading of Forster and Cavafy explains not only how Forster and Cavafy were both rooted in Western Hellenism, but also how their suppositions about it diverged significantly and how the two confronted the Orient in quite different ways. New light is also cast on their friendship; their different political views may have impeded its development.

Eastern Questions: Hellenism and Orientalism in the Writings of E. M. Forster and C. P. Cavafy makes use of unpublished documents, newly edited unfinished poetry (here made available for the first time to an English readership), and lesser-known texts, both fictional and nonfictional. The exchange between literary and non-literary texts, prose and poetry, focuses the ideological centre of Forster’s lifelong engagement with Greece and India and identifies the essence of Cavafy’s prolonged fixation on matters Hellenic. In the process Jeffreys’s New Historicist study applies contemporary critical trends in modern Greek studies to Forster criticism, producing an incisive, fresh reading of the relationship and the Cavafy and Forster canons.

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Late Nineteenth-Century Ireland’s Political and Religious Controversies in the Fiction of May Laffan Hartley

Late Nineteenth-Century Ireland’s Political and Religious Controversies in the Fiction of May Laffan Hartley

£25.00
22.9 x 15.3 cm.   

In her novels and short stories, May Laffan Hartley (1849–1916) depicts the religious and political controversies of late nineteenth-century Ireland. Eire’s own Helena Kelleher Kahn reintroduces us to Laffan’s vivid, witty fiction, rich in political and social commentary. Laffan did not offer clear-cut approval to one side or the other of the social and religious divide but weighed both and often found them wanting. She adds a missing dimension to the Irish world of Wilde, Shaw, and Joyce.

A woman of the age subtly embroiders the acute challenges and divisions of middle-class Ireland. As Kahn says, “she chose to write about the alcoholic ex-student, the impecunious solicitor, the farmer or merchant turned politician, and their often resentful wives and children. On the whole her world view was pessimistic. Rural Ireland was a beautiful intellectual desert. Dublin was a place to leave, not to live in.” This account of her life and work will be of interest to students of Anglo-Irish literature and history, as well as women’s studies.

Kelleher Kahn "provides a socio-historical context for middle-class Irish life that clearly articulates the principal issues of this culturally and politically dynamic period to both novice and academic readers of Irish fiction. Extensively researched with abundant endnotes, this book should be compulsory reading for those studying the marginalized Irish women writers of the nineteenth century." ―Victorian Studies, 48.4 (2006)

"I had never heard of May Laffan Hartley. Having now read one of her novels (Hogan MP, available as a free e-book on the ELT Press website) and Helena Kelleher Kahn’s erudite study of Laffan Hartley’s works, I find I’ve been provided the “missing dimension to the Irish world of Shaw and Joyce” Kahn predicted.... I highly recommend this work to aficionados of Irish studies." ―ELT, 49.3 (2006)

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An Edwardian’s View of Dickens and His Illustrators: Harry Furniss’s ‘A Sketch of Boz’

An Edwardian’s View of Dickens and His Illustrators: Harry Furniss’s ‘A Sketch of Boz’

£25.00
25.5 x 17.8 cm.  xii, 116 pp.  2005  with 69 illus.

Harry Furniss (1854–1925) was a well-known if somewhat abrasive figure in English literary, artistic and political circles during the half century either side of 1900. In March 1905, at the invitation of the Dickens Fellowship, he delivered in London’s Memorial Hall a platform lecture on Dickens and his illustrators, “A Sketch of Boz,” illuminated by some sixty magic lantern slides. Over the next two years Furniss toured the provinces with an enlarged version of this lecture. An Edwardian’s View of Dickens and His Illustrators is an edited and annotated transcription of the unpublished manuscript of this engaging lecture, together with the original illustrations, some of which are Furniss’s own.

Few complete texts of oral lectures have survived and, coming from the pen (and pencil) of a professional book illustrator and keen Dickensian, “A Sketch of Boz” is an important document in the culture of Edwardian England.

Professor Cordery’s substantial introduction discusses how the lecture sheds light on a number of fields: Dickens’s reputation and that of his illustrators in the early twentieth century; the cultural significance of the platform lecture; the changing style of illustration and caricature; the commercial and ideological exploitation of Dickens at the turn of the century. He summarises the main illustrators surveyed by Furniss and includes more than 170 annotations. The book thus engages a variety of readers interested in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British literature and culture.

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H. Rider Haggard on the Imperial Frontier: The Political and Literary Contexts of His African Romances

H. Rider Haggard on the Imperial Frontier: The Political and Literary Contexts of His African Romances

£28.00

22.9 x 15.3 cm.  304 pp.  2006

H. Rider Haggard on the Imperial Frontier, the first book-length study of H.R.H.'s African fiction, revises the image of Rider Haggard (1856–1925) as a mere writer of adventure stories, a brassy propagandist for British imperialism. Professor Monsman places Haggard’s imaginative works both in the context of colonial fiction writing and in the framework of subsequent postcolonial debates about history and its representation.

Like Olive Schreiner, Haggard was an Anglo-African writer straddling the moral divide of mixed allegiances—one empathetically African, the other quite English. The context for such Haggard tales as King Solomon’s Mines and She was a triad of extraordinary nineteenth-century cultures in conflict—British, Boer, and Zulu. Haggard mined his characters both from the ore of real-life Africa and from the depths of his subconscious, giving expression to feelings of cultural conflict, probing and subverting the dominant economic and social forces of imperialism. Monsman argues that Haggard endorses native religious powers as superior to the European empirical paradigm, celebrates autonomous female figures who defy patriarchal control, and covertly supports racial mixing. These social and political elements are integral to his thrilling story lines charged with an exoticism of lived nightmares and extraordinary ordeals. H. Rider Haggard on the Imperial Frontier will be of interest to readers of imperial history and biography, “lost race” and supernatural literature, tales of terror, and heroic fantasies. The book’s unsettling relevance to contemporary issues will engage a wide audience, and the groundbreaking biographical account of Haggard’s close contemporary Bertram Mitford in the appendix will add appeal to specialists.   More info →

Studying Oscar Wilde: History, Criticism, & Myth

Studying Oscar Wilde: History, Criticism, & Myth

£25.00
22.8 x 15.3 cm. 248 pp. 1880-1920 British Authors Series no. 22

Studying Oscar Wilde: History, Criticism, and Myth takes issue with many assumptions current in Wilde scholarship. It sets an engaging course in exploring Wilde’s literary reputation. In particular, Professors Guy and Small are interested in the tension between Wilde’s enduring popularity with the general reading public as a perennially witty entertainer and his status among academics as a complex, politicised writer attuned to the cultural and philosophical currents associated with modernity. Their argument focuses initially on the prominence of biographical readings of Wilde’s literary works, drawing attention to the contradictions in the ways biographers have described his life and to the problems of seeing his writing as a form of self-disclosure.

Subsequent chapters assess the usefulness of other forms of academic scholarship to understanding works that are not, on the surface, “difficult.” Here a number of commonly held views are challenged. To what extent is De Profundis autobiographical? How sophisticated is the learning exhibited in Intentions? In what ways are the society comedies “about” homosexuality? And how does The Picture of Dorian Gray relate to Wilde’s “mature” style?

The volume also examines some of Wilde’s lesser-known, unfinished works and scenarios, including The Cardinal of Avignon, La Sainte Courtisane, and A Florentine Tragedy (all printed as appendices), arguing that these “failed” works provide important insight into the reasons for Wilde’s popular success.

Since Guy and Small have authored numerous articles and books on Wilde, Studying Oscar Wilde: History, Criticism, and Myth will be a must read for scholars, but it is also written in a jargon-free language that will speak to that wider audience of readers who enjoy Oscar Wilde.

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