Series: Irish Literary Studies
Irish Literature in English, The Romantic Period

Irish Literature in English, The Romantic Period

£30.00 each

Vol 1 ISBN: 0-86140-272-3 / 978-0-901072-272-4 £30.00
Vol 2 ISBN:0-86140-273-1 / 978-0-901072-273-1 £30.00
The Pair ISBN: 0-901072-40-0 / 978-0-901072-40-5 £60.00

Originally advertised as Ireland and Romanticism, Patrick Rafroidi’s work is a revised and updated translation of his much acclaimed L’Irlande et le romantisme (1972). It is now published for the first time in English in two volumes, the first a study of the period and its authors, and the second an important work of reference on all the Irish literary figures of the time.

The study is divided into three sections, ‘Prelude to Romanticism’, ‘Nationalist Romanticism’, and ‘The Impact of Irish Romanticism’, with extensive notes and an index. Professor Rafroidi studies the causes of the movement, how it was influenced by political and literary landmarks of the time, and how the authors themselves influenced others, not only in England but also in the United States, in France and in Germany, and their rediscovery and use of Ireland’s early history and myths.

The reference section contains a general bibliography, bio-bibliographies of the Irish authors whose work was published between 1789 and 1850, information as to the performances of their plays in the most important theatres in the British Isles, and a list of the principal Irish periodicals of the time.

This is therefore a most useful work for all those interested in the period, and the bibliographies make it an essential work of reference which all libraries and students of Anglo-Irish Literature will need on their shelves, for continuous referral.

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Medieval and Modern Ireland

Medieval and Modern Ireland

£25.00
ISBN 978-0-86140-289-2

All the papers in Medieval and Modern Ireland were presented at the eighteenth annual international conference of the Canadian Association for Irish Studies, held at Calgary, Alberta, in February 1985. The conference theme, Medieval and Modern Ireland, was chosen by the organising committee for its intrinsic merits, and as a reasonable extension of the theme of the previous conference which focused on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Readers of this volume will be struck by the pervasiveness of the connections between the medieval and the modern in Ireland and the Irish, artists in particular, and realise why James Joyce could hardly avoid linking the modern Irish artist with the medieval Irish monk, as he does in the bitter musings of Stephen Dedalus, who walks alone into eternity along Sandymount Strand: ‘You were going to do wonders, what? Missionary to Europe after fiery Columbanus.’

The contributors are Hallvard Dahlie, Ann Dooley, John Wilson Foster, Brian John, Toni O’Brien Johnson, Heinz Kosok, F. X. Martin O.S.A., and Wolfgang Zach.

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A Study of the Novels of George Moore

A Study of the Novels of George Moore

£28.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.    271 pp.    1978       Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 3

George Moore once complained, after warmly appreciative reviews of a novel, 'So few bother to analyse the book carefully. It would have been very easy to discuss the form, compare my treatment of it with others' treatment of similar themes and so on, yet apparently no one has ever thought of that.' This rueful remark was the starting point in Richard Cave's design of this study. He has examined each of Moore's novels in detail and viewed them within the pattern of his total development and in the context of Moore's current reading and ideas about technique, as well as assessing the value of a wide range of influences to him. Professor Cave's study is basically divided into three parts: 'The Novel of Social Realism', which deals with A Modern Lover, A Mummer's Wife, A Drama in Muslin and Esther Waters;  'A Phase of Experiment' deals with new influences and the resultant problems, the four novellas, Wagner's influence, Evelyn Innes and Sister Teresa; and 'Styles for Consciousness' – The Lake, The Brook Kerith and the late historical novels, followed by a conclusion.

Author's Note
Introduction

Part One: THE NOVEL OF SOCIAL REALISM
1. A Modern Lover
2. A Mummer's Wife
3. A Drama in Muslin
4. Esther Waters

Part Two: A PHASE OF EXPERIMENT
5. New Influences – New Problems
6. Four Novellas
7. Wagner and the Novel
8. Evelyn Innes and Sister Teresa

Part Three: STYLES FOR CONSCIOUSNESS
9. The Lake – The Wagnerian Novel Perfected
10. The Brook Kerith and the Late Historical Novels
Conclusion

Notes

Index

Richard Allen Cave, Emeritus Professor of Drama and Theatre Arts at Royal Holloway in the University of London, has published extensively in the fields of renaissance drama (Jonson, Webster, Brome), modern English and Irish theatre (Wilde, Yeats, Pinter, Beckett, Friel, Mc Guinness), dance (Ninette de Valois, Robert Helpmann), stage design (Charles Ricketts, Robert Gregory) and direction (Terence Gray). Most recently, he devised and was General Editor of an AHRC-funded project to create an online edition of The Collected Plays of Richard Brome (2010), and published the monograph, Collaborations: Ninette de Valois and William Butler Yeats (2011). The Collected Brome is soon to be published in a more traditional book-format by Oxford University Press (2020). He has also edited the plays of Wilde, Yeats and T.C. Murray; and the manuscript versions of Yeats’s The King of the Great Clock Tower and A Full Moon in March. Professor Cave is a trained Feldenkrais practitioner who works on vocal techniques with professional actors and on extending movement skills with performers in physical theatre.

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J. M. Synge and the Western Mind

J. M. Synge and the Western Mind

£28.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm Irish Literary Studies series 4

Professor Thornton’s book calls into question the ideas generally held by critics of Synge that the religious milieu he was reared in had slight influence upon him, that his relationships with his family were of virtually no importance to him, and that he cared little for matters concerning ‘belief’ generally. The view presented here is that Synge was always more concerned about beliefs than he appeared to be with his taciturn public manner, and that the theme of the relationship between ‘beliefs’ and ‘reality’ is basic to his work.

This volume examines the impact the early years of Synge’s life and his visits to the Aran Islands had on him, generating themes and devices that became the staples of his drama. Dr. Thornton defines the philosophical premises which underlie the major plays and the developing theatrical techniques Synge devised to embody his explorations of the nature of belief. Deirdre of the Sorrows marks a fitting culmination to his career, showing how completely Synge had transformed his concern with stereotypes of response from a realisation to be articulated or a philosophical problem to be solved into a tool to facilitate the discovery of his individual viewpoint.

CONTENTS
Acknowledgements
Introduction
I. Seed Time of the Soul
II. The Verge of the Western World
III. The Shock of Some Inconceivable Idea
IV. First Fruits: The Shadow of the Glen; Riders to the Sea; The Tinker's Wedding
V. Dreamer's Vexation or Poet's Balm?: The Well of the Saints and The Playboy of the Western World
VI. A Sense that fits him to perceive objects unseen before: Deirdre of the Sorrows
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index

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Irish Poetry from Moore to Yeats

Irish Poetry from Moore to Yeats

£30.00

Irish Poetry from Moore to Yeats examines the work of seven of the most significant Irish poets of the nineteenth century. Beginning with the impact that Thomas Moore's nationalist sentiment and generalised tone had on the language of poetry for much of the century, Dr. Welch then discusses J. J. Callanan’s attempt to deal with a Byronic restlessness and his startling translations from the Gaelic. He shows how James Clarence Mangan tested out different ‘voices’ to express his psychic plurality and discovered a special freedom in his versions of Gaelic originals. He describes the foundering of Samuel Ferguson’s vision of the reconciliation of Gaelic and Protestant traditions and demonstrates how the transcendental Catholicism of Aubrey de Vere mirrored Ireland’s historical difficulties. He surveys William Allingham's scope, fairmindedness and attention to detail, and lastly considers the comprehensive power of W. B. Yeats’s searching, qualifying imagination that informs his early work. A tradition emerges, composite, flawed, passionate, rhetorical, anxious; its intricate entanglements underlie many of the preoccupations of twentieth century Irish life and writing.

CONTENTS
Acknowledgements
Introduction
1. Thomas Moore: An Elegiac Silence
2. J. J. Callanan: A Provincial Romantic
3. James Clarence Mangan: 'Apples from the Dead Sea Shore'
4. Sir Samuel Ferguson: The Two Races of Ireland
5. Aubrey de Vere: An Attempt at a Catholic Humanity
6. William Allingham: 'The power and zest of all appearance'
7. Yeats and Oisin
Notes
List of Works Cited
Index More info →

Yeats, Sligo And Ireland

Yeats, Sligo And Ireland

£30.00
21.6 x 13.8 pp.     x, 267 pp.   1980       Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 6

The twenty-first Yeats International Summer School was held in Sligo in 1980, and the Yeats Society, wishing to mark the school’s coming of age, asked Professor A. Norman Jeffares to edit a volume of essays specially com­missioned for the occasion. These essays are by Directors of the school and scholars who have lectured at it.

The essayists are Lester Conner, Denis Donoghue, Barbara Hardy, Seamus Heaney, T. R. Henn, John Holloway, A. Norman Jeffares, John Kelly, F. S. L. Lyons, Augustine Martin, D. E. S. Maxwell, William M. Murphy, Patrick Rafroidi, Ann Saddlemyer and Helen Vendler, together with a poem by Brendan Kennelly. OnIy one essay is not new, that by the late T. R. Henn; it was given as a lecture and included in his Last Essays: appositely it is on his native Sligo,

These essays show the breadth of Yeats studies, indicating eloquently the tremendous hold that Yeats exerts on scholar and general reader alike, stressing that he is the greatest poet Ireland and the twentieth century have produced.

'Remarkable for their vitality and freshness of interpretation.' ,i>Choice

CONTENTS
Acknowledgements
Introduction. A. Norman Jeffares
A MATTER OF CHARACTER: RED HANRAHAN AND CRAZY JANE.  Lester I.Conner
ROMANTIC IRELAND.  Denis Donoghue
THE WILDNESS OF CRAZY JANE.  Barbara Hardy
YEATS AS AN EXAMPLE?.  Seamus Heaney
THE PLACE OF SHELLS.  T.R.Henn
HOW GOES THE WEATHER?  John Holloway
YEATS AND THE WRONG LEVER.  A.Norman Jeffares
THE VISITOR. Brendan Kennelly
YEATS AND VICTORIAN IRELAND.  F.S.L.Lyons
HOUND VOICES WERE THEY ALL: AN EXPERIMENT IN YEATS CRITICISM. Augustine Martin
THE SHAPE-CHANGERS.  D.E.S.Maxwell
HOME LIFE AMONG THE YEATSES.  William M.Murphy
YEATS, NATURE AND THE SELF.  Patrick Rafroidi
THE 'DWARF DRAMAS' OF THE EARLY ABBEY THEATRE.  Ann Saddlemyer
FOUR ELEGIES.  Helen Vendler
BOOKS AND NUMBERLESS DREAMS: YEATS'S RELATIONS WITH HIS EARLY PUBLISHERS.  John S.Kelly
Notes on Contributors
Speakers at Sligo 1960-1980
Index

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Sean O’Casey, Centenary Essays

Sean O’Casey, Centenary Essays

£33.00
ISBN: 978-0-86140-008-9
21.6 x 13.8 cm.    x, 257 pp. 1981   Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume  7

This volume was created to mark the centenary of the birth of Sean O’Casey. It covers every aspect of his life and work, with essays from leading scholars in the field of O’Casey studies: Ronald Ayling, Bernard Benstock, Mary FitzGerald, David Krause, Robert G. Lowery, William J. Maroldo, Alan Simp­son and Stanley Weintraub, to­gether with a Chronology and a list of productions of O’Casey’s plays, both by Robert G. Lowery. The subjects covered include O’Casey’s relations with the Abbey Theatre, Lady Gregory, W. B. Yeats, and Bernard Shaw together with assessments of the influence that James Joyce, politics, religion and Ireland had on the play­wright and his plays.

CONTENTS
SEAN O'CASEY: A CHRONOLOGY.  Robert G.Lowery
SEAN O'CASEY AND THE ABBEY THEATRE, DUBLIN.  Ronald Ayling
SEAN O'CASEY AND/OR JAMES JOYCE.  Bernard Benstock
SEAN O'CASEY AND LADY GREGORY: THE RECORD OF A FRIENDSHIP.  Mary FitzGerald
THE DRUIDIC AFFINITIES OF O'CASEY AND YEATS.  David Krause
SEAN O'CASEY: ART AND POLITICS.  Robert G.Lowery
EARLIEST YOUTH: PRISTINE CATHOLICISM AND GREEN PATRIOTISM IN O'CASEY'S IRISH BOOKS.  William J.Maroldo
THE UNHOLY TRINITY: A SIMPLE GUIDE TO HOLY IRELAND c. 1880-1980.  Alan Simpson
SHAW'S OTHER KEEGAN: O'CASEY AND G.B.S.  Stanley Weintraub
SEAN O'CASEY AND THE ABBEY THEATRE.  Robert G.Lowery
Index

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Denis Johnston, A Retrospective

Denis Johnston, A Retrospective

£38.00

Published to mark Johnston's eightieth birthday, when he was the doyen of Ireland's living playwrights, this volume brings together memories from friends and critical essays on his work and achievement by leading scholars – John Boyd, Curtis Canfield, Richard Allen Cave, Mark Culme-Seymour, Cyril Cusack, Hilton Edwards, Maurice Elliott, Harold Ferrar, Robert Hogan, Thomas Kilroy, Roger McHugh, Micheál mac Liammóir, D.E.S.Maxwell, Vivian Mercier, Christopher Murray, B.L.Reid, Joseph Ronsley and Christine St Peter – together with a checklist of Denis Johnston's writings compiled by the editor of this volume.

Included as an appendix are some recent revisions by Denis Johnston to his A Bride for the Unicorn.

CONTENTS
Introduction
List of Illustrations
AN APPRECIATION. Hilton Edwards
THE OLD LADY SAYS `NO!' Micheál MacLiammóir
THE OLD LADY: IN PRINCIPIO. Christine St Peter
WAITING FOR EMMET. D.E.S.Maxwell
A NOTE ON THE NATURE OF EXPRESSIONISM AND DENIS JOHNSTON'S PLAYS. Curtis Canfield
THE MOON IN THE YELLOW RIVER: DENIS JOHNSTON'S SHAVIANISM. Thomas Kilroy
DENIS JOHNSTON'S HORSE LAUGH. Robert Hogan
JOHNSTON, TOLLER AND EXPRESSIONISM. Richard Allen Cave
THE GOLDEN CUCKOO: `A VERY REMARKABLE BIRD'. Christopher Murray
'HE IS ALWAYS JUST ROUND THE NEXT CORNER.' DENIS JOHNSTON'S IN SEARCH OF SWIFT . Maurice Elliott
'A HUMANE AND WELL-INTENTIONED PIECE OF GALLANTRY': DENIS JOHNSTON'S THE SCYTHE AND THE SUNSET Joseph Ronsley
THE ENDLESS SEARCH. John Boyd
THE PLAYS OF DENIS JOHNSTON. Roger McHugh
DEAR DENIS! Cyril Cusack
DENIS JOHNSTON'S SPIRITUAL QUEST. Harold Ferrar
JOHNSTON IN ACADEME. B.L. Reid
WITH DENIS JOHNSTON IN THE WESTERN DESERT. Mark Culme-Seymour
PERFECTION OF THE LIFE OR OF THE WORK. Vivian Mercier
CHECKLIST-LIST OF DENIS JOHNSTON'S WRITINGS. Joseph Ronsley
APPENDIX: REVISIONS TO A BRIDE FOR THE UNICORN, ETC. Denis Johnston
Notes on Contributors
Index

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Literature and the Changing Ireland

Literature and the Changing Ireland

£30.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.    x, 230 pp.    1982    
  Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 9

The papers in this collection were, with one exception, given at the triennial conference of the International Association for the Study of Anglo-Irish Literature held in St. Patrick's College, Maynooth, Ireland, in 1979.

The theme of the conference was the place of literature in a changing Ireland, and to this end the speakers' papers covered various aspects of this important subject. The contributors to this volume are in the order they appear here. Declan Kiberd, Klaus Lubbers, Cathal Ó Háinle, Vivian Mercier, Suheil Bushrui, Stan Smith, D. E. S. Maxwell, Thomas Kilroy, Peter Denman, James O'Brien, and Patrick Rafroidi.

CONTENTS
Introduction. Peter Connolly
Acknowledgements
THE PERILS OF NOSTALGIA: A CRITIQUE OF THE REVIVAL.  Declan Kiberd
AUTHOR AND AUDIENCE IN THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY.  Klaus Lubbers
TOWARDS THE REVIVAL. SOME TRANSLATIONS OF IRISH POETRY:  1789-1897.  Cathal G. Ó Háinle
VICTORIAN EVANGELICALISM AND THE ANGLO-IRISH LITERARY REVIVAL. Vivian Mercier
IMAGES OF A CHANGING IRELAND IN THE WORKS OF W.B.YEATS.  Suheil Badi Bushrui
HISTORIANS AND MAGICIANS: IRELAND BETWEEN FANTASY AND HISTORY. Stan Smith
SEMANTIC SCRUPLES: A RHETORIC FOR POLITICS IN THE NORTH. D.E.S.Maxwell
THE IRISH WRITER: SELF AND SOCIETY, 1950-1980.  Thomas Kilroy
RHYME IN MODERN ANGLO-IRISH POETRY.  Peter Denman
THREE IRISH WOMEN STORY WRITERS IN THE 1970s.  James O'Brien
CHANGE AND THE IRISH IMAGINATION.  Patrick Rafroidi
Notes on the Contributors
Index

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James Joyce: an International Perspective

James Joyce: an International Perspective

£35.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm. xiv, 301 pp. 1982 Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 10

Published to mark the centenary of Joyce's birth, this collection has a foreword by Richard Ellmann, a message from Samuel Beckett, and essays by Bernard Benstock, Paul & Sylvia Botheroyd, Terence Brown, Suheil Bushrui, Paul van Caspel, Dominic Daniel, Phillip Herring, Declan Kiberd, Augustine Martin, Vivian Mercier, David Norris, John Paul Riquelme, Charles Rossmann, Ann Saddlemyer, Thomas F.Staley and Francis Warner, as well as poems by Suzanne Brown, Suheil Bushrui, John Montague and Gearóid Ó Clérigh, and a chronology. It covers every aspect of Joyce's work, with essays on each of the major works, on his poetry, and studies on various aspects of his life, the influence of Rimbaud, Joyce's connections with the Irish Dramatic Movement, and Joyce in Dublin, as well as essays on Joyce scholarship up to the date of publication.

'All in all, a rewarding compilation, rarely arid, and frequently vivacious.' Sunday Tribune

'an excellent book, one of the most provocative and rewarding in the current centenary-year cornucopia.' Books Ireland'

CONTENTS
A Message from Samuel Beckett
In Memoriam Sir Desmond Cochrane 1918-1979
Foreword: JOYCE AFTER A HUNDRED YEARS. Richard Ellmann
Acknowledgements
Introduction. Suheil Badi Bushrui and Bernard Benstock
JAMES JOYCE - NÓ SÉAMAS SEOIGHE. Gearóid Ó Clérigh
DUBLIN OF DUBLINERS. Terence Brown
THE READER'S ROLE IN A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN. Charles Rossman
EXILES: A MORAL STATEMENT. Dominic Daniel
ON THE NATURE OF EVIDENCE IN ULYSSES. Bernard Benstock
JOHN EGLINTON AS SOCRATES: A STUDY OF `SCYLLA AND CHARYBDIS'. Vivian Mercier
TWISTS OF THE TELLER'S TALE: FINNEGANS WAKE. John Paul Riquelme
THE POETRY OF JAMES JOYCE. FRANCIS WARNER
JAMES JOYCE. John Montague
A TURNIP FOR THE BOOKS: JAMES JOYCE, A CENTENARY TRIBUTE. David Norris
SIN AND SECRECY IN JOYCE'S FICTION. Augustine Martin
THE VULGARITY OF HEROICS: JOYCE'S ULYSSES. Declan Kiberd
NIGHT FOX: FOR JAMES JOYCE. Suzanne Brown
JOYCE AND RIMBAUD. AN INTRODUCTORY ESSAY. Phillip Herring
JAMES JOYCE AND THE IRISH DRAMATIC MOVEMENT. Ann Saddlemyer
THE WANDERS: FOR JAMES JOYCE. Suheil Bushrui
JOYCE STUDIES IN THE NETHERLANDS. Paul van Caspel
JOYCE IN GERMANY AND SWITZERLAND. Paul and Sylvia Botheroyd
JOYCE IN THE ARAB WORLD. Suheil Bushrui
FOLLOWING ARIADNE'S STRING: TRACING JOYCE SCHOLARSHIP
INTO THE EIGHTIES. Thomas F.Staley
Notes on Contributors
Index More info →

Synge: the Medieval and the Grotesque

Synge: the Medieval and the Grotesque

£28.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm    viii, 209 pp.   1982           Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 11

J. M. Synge’s plays have often been regarded as folk drama, but this study considers them from a new literary perspective. It stresses the importance of the playwright’s studies with two medievalists at the Sorbonne, Professors Henri d’Arbois de Jubainville and Louis Petit de Julleville, and makes, for the first time, a full examination of the various uses he made of medieval material. This is shown to contain grotesque motifs which accommodate both Synge’s inclusive anti­thetical vision and the Rabe­laisian note in Irish peasant life, as he perceived it. Toni O’Brien Johnson also shows that the use of Hiberno-English language structures reinforces the clash inherent in the grotesque in Synge’s plays.

This book shows the opera­tion of the dramatist’s dualist aesthetic through the co­presence in his work of what is repulsive and sublime, cruel and noble, violent and heroic, pitiless and beautiful. It also emphasises the prominent role played by bodily life and the degenerative aspects of old age, death, and decay in Synge’s work.

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Carleton’s ‘Traits and Stories’ and the 19th Century Anglo-Irish Tradition

Carleton’s ‘Traits and Stories’ and the 19th Century Anglo-Irish Tradition

£40.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.  xiv, 432 pp.  1983    Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 12

The twenty-nine stories in William Carleton’s Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry each had a different publishing history. Some had appeared in periodicals as different as the Christian Examiner and the Dublin Literary Gazette; every story underwent revision when it first appeared in a book and in subsequent editions. These revisions were not slight. On occasion Carleton transformed the story almost out of recognition: ‘The Landlord and Tenant’ was doubled into ‘Tubber Derg or the Red Well’; he censored ‘An Essay on Irish Swearing’; ‘Going to Maynooth’ was improved by lengthy inter­polations.

In this study, Dr. Hayley follows the development of all the stories from their earliest appearances, through all the editions of the First and Second Series of Traits and Stories, up to the definitive ‘New Edition’ of the collection of 1842-44, with observations on later editions. She comments on all the changes to each story in this important work, which was so popular and influential on both sides of the Atlantic in the 19th Century.

Traits and Stories marks a significant period in Irish letters and in Irish publishing. By having his books published in Dublin rather than London, Carleton led the revival of Irish literature and publishing that took place in the 1830s and 1840s. The revisions that he made to the collection were a response to the changing literary and political climate of Ireland, and also to the reactions of his wide readership abroad. For this reason, and for its own unusual history, this chronicle of the development of a book is an interesting and valuable study.

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Lady Gregory, Fifty Years After

Lady Gregory, Fifty Years After

£38.00

It is now over fifty years since the death of Augusta Gregory, who as a playwright, folklorist, essayist, poet, translator, editor, theatre administrator and nationalist, contributed so much and so uniquely to the realisation of modern Ireland. Yet soon after her death she seemed to be virtually forgotten, and the words on her gravestone – ‘she shall be remembered for ever’ – had a very hollow ring about them.

It has only been in the last twenty-five years that Lady Gregory’s reputation has turned round, beginning with Elizabeth Coxhead’s biography, and the subsequent appearance of the Coole Edition of her works. The publication of Mary Lou Kohfeldt's biography in 1985 and now the appearance of this volume – the first collection of essays to be devoted to her – must surely create a greater awareness of her importance as a cornerstone of the Irish Literary Revival.

Her books and plays, together with her work for the Abbey as manager, playwright, play-reader and fund-raiser, have had an influence on the literary life of Ireland in the first half of this century that has been greatly underestimated.

This collection opens with fragments of memory about Lady Gregory, and then brings together leading critics to write about various aspects of her life, her work, and her friendships with Yeats, W. S. Blunt, Sean O’Casey, John Quinn, and Douglas Hyde. There is also a checklist of her contributions to periodicals (over 180 items so far discovered), and an assessment of the work of her son, Robert Gregory.

Fragments of memory come from George Moore, The Sunday Herald (Boston), Signe Toksvig, Sean O’Casey, The Rt. Rev. Arnold Harvey, Anne Gregory, W. B. Yeats, Anne Yeats, Maire nic Shiubhlaigh, W. G. Fay, Brinsley MacNamara and Gabriel Fallon.

The contributors are Andrew E. Malone, Mary FitzGerald, Mary Lou Kohfeldt Stevenson, Brian Jenkins, James Pethica, Elizabeth Longford, Daniel J. Murphy, Gareth W. Dunleavy, Maureen Murphy, John Kelly, Richard Allen Cave, Ronald Ayling, Robert Welch, Bernard Shaw, Dan H. Laurence, Lorna D. Young, Ann Saddlemyer, Colin Smythe.

INTRODUCTION. Ann Saddlemyer and Colin Smythe
Acknowledgements
CHRONOLOGY. Colin Smythe
FRAGMENTS OF MEMORY
Pen Portraits: George Moore Sunday Herald (Boston) Signe Toksvig Sean O'Casey
The Chatelaine of Coole: The Rt. Rev. Arnold Harvey, Anne Gregory, W. B. Yeats, Anne Yeats, Sean O'Casey, W. B. Yeats
At the Abbey Theatre: Maire nic Shiubhlaigh W. G. Fay Brinsley MacNamara Gabriel Fallon
LADY GREGORY, 1852–1932. Andrew E. Malone
'PERFECTION OF THE LIFE': LADY GREGORY'S AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL WRITINGS. Mary FitzGerald
THE CLOUD OF WITNESSES. Mary Lou Kohfeldt Stevenson
THE MARRIAGE. Brian Jenkins
LADY GREGORY AND WILFRID SCAWEN BLUNT. Elizabeth Longford
'A WOMAN'S SONNETS'. Lady Gregory, with a Commentary by James Pethica
'DEAR JOHN QUINN''. Daniel J. Murphy
THE PATTERN OF THREE THREADS: THE HYDE-GREGORY FRIENDSHIP. Gareth W. Dunleavy
LADY GREGORY AND THE GAELIC LEAGUE. Maureen Murphy
LADY GREGORY AND SEAN O'CASEY: AN UNLIKELY FRIENDSHIP REVISITED. Ronald Ayling
'FRIENDSHIP IS ALL THE HOUSE I HAVE': LADY GREGORY AND W. B. YEATS. John Kelly
A LANGUAGE FOR HEALING. Robert Welch
NOTE ON LADY GREGORY'S PLAYS. Bernard Shaw, edited by Dan H. Laurence
FOUR FRENCH COMEDIES: LADY GREGORY'S TRANSLATIONS OF MOLIÈRE. Mary FitzGerald
IN RETROSPECT: LADY GREGORY'S PLAYS FIFTY YEARS LATER. Lorna D. Young
THE GLORY OF THE WORLD AND THE PEASANT MIRROR. Ann Saddlemyer
LADY GREGORY'S CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERIODICALS: A CHECKLIST. Colin Smythe
APPENDIX: ROBERT GREGORY: ARTIST AND STAGE DESIGNER. Richard Allen Cave
Notes
Notes on Contributors
Index

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‘Since O’Casey’ and other essays on Irish Drama

‘Since O’Casey’ and other essays on Irish Drama

£25.00

In this collection of lucid essays that cover the entire eighty years of modern Irish drama, Robert Hogan writes about the major Irish dramatists of the 20th century and their impact on audiences, and on other playwrights, as well as considering the works themselves. In them he uses a variety of critical techniques, ranging from biography to studies of influence, structure and dialogue, to history and anecdote, and the ill-treatment of several sacred cows.

In addition to essays on such giants as Synge, O'Casey, and Beckett, the book deals with more neglected figures such as W. J. Lawrence and the still insufficiently appreciated George Fitzmaurice and Denis Johnston. It also presents a full critical survey of the years 1963-83 in which exciting writers like Brian Friel, Hugh Leonard and John B. Keane made their mark. The author's style and varied ways of dealing with the subjects make this volume particularly enjoyable, as well as informative, reading.

CONTENTS
Preface
YEATS CREATES A CRITIC
THE INFLUENCE OF SYNGE
THERE IS REALISM AND REALISM
O'CASEY, THE STYLE AND THE ARTIST
O'CASEY, THE STYLE AND THE MAN
THE INFLUENCE OF O'CASEY
DENIS JOHNSTON'S HORSE LAUGH
TRYING TO LIKE BECKETT
SINCE O'CASEY
A Factual Appendix
A Critical Appendix, by W. J. Lawrence, containing his reviews of Birthright by T. C. Murray (1910), The Magic Glasses by George Fitzmaurice (1913), Shanwalla by Lady Gregory (1915), and Juno and the Paycock by Sean O'Casey (1924)
Notes
Index

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George Moore in Perspective

George Moore in Perspective

£30.00

21.6 x 13.8 cm   174 pp.  1983       Irish literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 16

George Moore was considered during his lifetime to have been one of the supreme masters of prose style in the early years of the 20th century, and he was renowned for rewriting his books as his style developed. His many famous works include Hail and Farewell!, The Lake, A Drama in Muslin (rewritten as Muslin), Evelyn Innes, Esther Waters, The Brook Kerith and A Story Teller's Holiday, though many would immediately call to mind others of his oeuvre.

Moore died in January 1933 and this collection was brought together to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of his death. The essays (in order of appearance in the book) are
'George Moore, a reappraisal' (Janet Egleson Dunleavy);
'Moore Hall, 1952' (Richard J.Byrne);
'George Moore's Paris' (Jane Crisler);
'George Moore's Dublin' (James Liddy);
'Private Moore, Public Moore' (Robert Stephen Becker);
'George Moore's Medievalism' (Gareth W. Dunleavy);
'The Moore-Joyce Nexus' (Patrick A.McCarthy);
  'George Moore and Samuel Beckett' (Melvin J. Friedman);
'Collecting Moore' (Edwin Gilcher).
To these are added a collection of 17 portraits, in life and caricature, of George Moore, and an appendix 'Some Bibliographical Notes' by Edwin Gilcher, in which he adds to the information he published in his 1970 Bibliography.

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W.B.Yeats, Dramatist of Vision

W.B.Yeats, Dramatist of Vision

£30.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm     xvi, 256 pp.   1983     Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X)  volume 17

Eighty years ago, in a letter to John Quinn, that benefactor in so many ways of the Irish Literary Revival, Yeats wrote that ‘if Finvara, that ancient God, now king of Faery’, were to offer him a gift, ‘I would say, “Let my plays be acted . . .” ’

In spite of, and perhaps because of, the recognition that Yeats has received as a major poet, his wish is still largely unrealised. Thus A. S. Knowland’s critical guide to those plays of Yeats that appear in Collected Plays does have an emphasis on their theatrical viability. He studies each play, dividing them between the lour stages in the playwright's development, Early Stages, Plays of Transition, The Central Achievement, and Last Stages, as well as adding an Epilogue, and including a postscript about one play not in Collected Plays, but which should fairly be discussed in a volume of this nature, Where There is Nothing.

Cyril Cusack has written a Preface in which he recalls performing in Yeats's plays at the Abbey and his reactions on meeting him.

`Deserves to take its place among the handful of recent studies that have taken the plays as plays...and explored them in terms of their theatre presentation.' Augustine Martin in The Irish Independent.

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The Irish Writer and the City

The Irish Writer and the City

£30.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.      x, 203 pp.     1984       Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 18
.

The papers in this collection were given at the fifth triennial conference of the International Association for the Study of Anglo-Irish Literature held at University College, Dublin in July 1982.

The theme of the conference – the Irish writer and the city – is one that has not been extensively studied. Traditionally Irish writing has concerned itself with the countryside and the Big House, but as essays in this collection show, there was a hidden literature of the city, particularly in the drama, in the eighteenth and nine­teenth centuries, and in the nineteenth the city was a recurrent element in novels from Maria Edgeworth to George Moore. The incidence of urban settings increased in the twentieth century with Belfast, Cork, Dublin and Limerick emerging as challenging centres of literary concern. It is the complex issue of the relationships between the writers and the cities that these essays discuss. The movement of population from the countryside to the cities in the late nineteenth century led to some ambivalence on the part of writers who viewed the urban setting with a distaste that was partly determined by nostalgia for the rural hinterland. Social revolution complicated the problem by reducing the social density and creating a middle class that took some time to assert itself. Eventually ambivalence and dis­taste were replaced by acceptance or at least by the recognition that the city was home, the world they knew best and could best describe. These essays help us to understand how that confidence de­veloped and to see its thematic, technical and linguistic features. In the process they show that the subject of the Irish writer and the city is well worth examining.

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O’Casey the Dramatist

O’Casey the Dramatist

£40.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 19

O’Casey, the Dramatist is the first study to analyse each of Sean O’Casey’s plays in the context of the whole body of his work. His first plays were performed by the Abbey Theatre in Dublin until it refused The Silver Tassie, a rejection that brought about a most acrimonious debate, broke up friendships, and caused O’Casey to sever his links with the Abbey. Its directors were unable to understand the first of his experimental plays, and could not appreciate its true quality. Thence­forth O'Casey’s writing developed along new lines, mostly away from his Irish roots.

In popular estimation his best plays are those of the Dublin years – The Shadow of a Gunman, Juno and the Paycock and The Plough and the Stars – but many of his later works are greatly undervalued; indeed The Silver Tassie, Within the Gates, Purple Dust, Red Roses for Me, Hall of Healing, Cock-a-doodle Dandy and The Bishop's Bonfire are all masterpieces of modern drama, as this study shows.

Professor Kosok considers all the twenty-three extant plays, tracing O'Casey's development as a playwright through a chronological study and show­ing that his work can be divided into five periods, which are considered in this volume under the headings ‘Dublin as a Mirror of the World’, 'Experiments’, ‘Ideology and Drama', ‘Ireland as a Microcosm', and ‘Bitterness and Recon­ciliation’. He ends this study with a section headed ‘Continuity and Originality' in which he briefly summarises the findings of previous scholarship, suggests some additional answers to general problems, and indicates some avenues for future research.

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The Double Perspective of Yeats’s Aesthetic

The Double Perspective of Yeats’s Aesthetic

£30.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.   200 pp.   1984   Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 20

The Double Perspective of Yeats’s Aes­thetic offers penetrating insights into the poet’s aesthetic principles. These are characterised, Professor Komesu demon­strates, by a polarity of perspective. He argues that Yeats envisaged life as both unity and conflict, and regarded art as an embodiment of both experience and knowledge. The peculiar nature of this Yeatsian polarity is that the conflicting perspectives are not irreconcilably at war, but exist in a complementary relationship, in which one lives the other’s death, and dies the other’s life. This polarity sometimes led the poet into a logical impasse out of which he tried to struggle in vain. But from it, nonetheless, he gained the dramatic force and tension which enabled him to create a world of poetic vision and experience, one with a magnitude which is all its own. Professor Komesu finds this polarised perspective inherent in the literary theory of the West, constituting a discernible tradition that shapes such divergent artistic movements as Classicism and Romanticism. He contends that Yeats’s place must be found within this tradition.

CONTENTS
Preface

PART I
1. Introduction
2. Knowledge or Experience
3. The Saint or the Artist

PART II
4. Brahman or Daimon
5. The Flower or the Gyre
6. The Flower That Never Bloomed
7. Conclusion
Notes
Index

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The Pioneers of Anglo-Irish Fiction 1800-1850

The Pioneers of Anglo-Irish Fiction 1800-1850

£30.00
Irish Literary Studies series 21

The years 1800-1850 saw the emergence in Ireland of a number of novelists and story writers who took as their subject matter their native country, its people and its social, economic, and political problems. Their pioneering work is not only a unique record of life in rural Ireland in the late 18th and early 19th centuries before the disasters of the great famine in the 1840s changed many things irreversibly; it also initiated a tradition of Anglo-Irish fiction which, in the twentieth century has achieved international stature and recognition.

This book examines the origins of that tradition and the particular circumstances, both literary and social, from which the earliest Anglo-Irish fiction sprang. It is comprehensive in scope, considering not only the major writers – Maria Edgeworth, Lady Morgan, the Banim brothers, Gerald Griffin, and William Carleton – but also lesser figures such as Charles Maturin, Mrs S. C. Hall, Samuel Lover, the early work of Charles Lever and Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and other minor contributors. This inclusiveness helps to generate a picture of the diversity of theme and character found in the novels, and illustrates how effectively the texture of certain aspects of Irish life is evoked in them. There is also a chronology for the period from 1767, the year of Maria Edgeworth’s birth, up to 1850. It sets the lives and works of the novelists discussed in this book against the literary, social and political contexts of their times, both in Ireland and abroad.

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