Irish Poetry after Feminism

Irish Poetry after Feminism

£25.00

These essays are revised versions of lectures given at the Princess Grace Irish Library in Monaco, and address some of the most exciting developments in Irish poetry over the last thirty years, concentrating especially on the work of Derek Mahon, Medbh McGuckian, Vona Groarke and Sinéad Morrissey. Irish Poetry after Feminism also includes forthright debate between the contributors about the relations between ideology and poetics. Gathering some of the finest critics, the volume makes an important contribution to one of the central debates about Irish literature.

'Feminism and Irish poetry are . . . natural allies, not antagonists; to posit them otherwise is to declare the redundancy of art in its capacity to change lives on its own terms. With such an understanding, students of the topic of Irish poetry after feminism are released to seek out its neglected aspect in an investigation of Irish feminism after poetry, in confidence that relations of hospitality and exchange, rather than those of absolutism and hierarchy, can be expected to prevail between the art form and the intellectual, social and political tradition concerned.' Catriona Clutterbuck

CONTENTS
Justin Quinn: Introduction
Moynagh Sullivan. Irish Poetry after Feminism: In Search of 'Male Poets'
Peter McDonald. The Touch of a Blind Man: Forms, Origins and 'Hermeneutics' in Poetry
Catriona Clutterbuck. An Unapproved Alliance: Feminism and Form in the Irish Poetry Debate
Derek Mahon: First Principles
Fran Brearton. On Derek Mahon's 'First Principles'
Lucy Collins. Northeast of Nowhere: Vona Groarke, Sinéad Morrissey and Post-Feminist Spaces
Selina Guinness. The Annotated House: Feminism and Form
Leontia Flynn. On the Sofa: Parody & McGuckian
David Wheatley. That They May Be Damned: Samuel Beckett and the Poetry of Misogyny

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Assessing the 1984 ‘Ulysses’

Assessing the 1984 ‘Ulysses’

£30.00

Alongside Eliot's Waste Land and Ezra Pound's Cantos, Ulysses is unquestionably the most important literary text of this century. That is why it is both natural and necessary to pay more than the usual attention to the significant detail embedded in that monumental work.

Joyce demanded that Ulysses be published on his fortieth birthday, 2 February 1922. He forced the non-English-speaking printers in Dijon to work against next to impossible deadlines, and from almost unreadable manuscripts and proofs, so clotted were they with revisions. For this and other reasons, Joyce himself was acutely aware of the unusually large number of 'errors' in the body of the book, and said as much in his letters to friends. There 'errors' irritated him so much that he even issued a number of errata lists during his lifetime, but to no avail. All editions of Ulysses teemed with misprints and other 'errors': this is about the only statement on which there is genuine critical consensus.

In the late 1970s a comprehensive research project was mounted in Munich in systematically to deal with these 'errors' with the aid of a sophisticated computer program. The outcome was the 'error-free' edition of Ulysses published on Bloomsday 1984.

The sole purpose of the conference held in Monaco in 1985, bringing together some of the most outstanding experts of the Joycean text, was to scrutinise collectively the validity of the changes made by the Munich team.

Anthony Burgess points out in his Preface that in Ulysses as in Finnegans Wake, 'it is virtually impossible to divide substance from form... the characters are so embedded in their mode of presentation that it would be dangerous to release them from their verbal ambience'. It is precisely that point that makes this collection of papers an indispensable companion to the New Text of Ulysses as it has emerged from its 1984 facelift.

The outstanding Joyce scholars contributing to this work include Richard Ellmann, Clive Hart, Fritz Senn, David Hayman, and Richard Kain.

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Irishness in a Changing Society

Irishness in a Changing Society

£30.00

In late May 1986, following the success of its first annual conference in 1985, the Princess Grace Irish Library hosted its second conference. It was attended by over thirty scholars, writers, journalists and policy-makers, who heard and gave papers concerning the concept of national identity, north and south of the Border.

This collection of the papers given at the conference has a wide-ranging appeal to anyone interested in what Irishness means. The lectures were delivered by experts in many fields: religion, history, politics, literature, economics and philosophy. The cross-currents and exchange of information and ideas between their various disciplines combined to present an exciting and thought-provoking view of Irishness as it has evolved, and is continuing to evolve today.

The contributors include R.V.Comerford, Hugh Leonard, Louis le Brocquy, Patrick Rafroidi, Maurice Harmon, Terence Brown, Richard Kearney, Mary E. Daly, Joseph Lee, David Harkness, John A. Murphy, Dermot Keogh, Maurice Goldring, Mark Mortimer, Garret Fitzgerald, John Hume, and Andy O'Mahony.

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Yeats The European

Yeats The European

£40.00

21.6 x 13.8 pp.    xvi, 340 pp.  1989      Princess Grace Irish Library series (ISSN 0269-2619)  volume 3

Contains the papers given at the 1987 conference held at the Princess Grace Irish Library, Monaco, with contributions assessing Yeats's influence on European authors and how much the European mainland and its authors, artists and sculptors influenced him.

The papers in this volume are by Michael Alexander, Birgit Bramsbäck, Toni Cerutti, Denis Donoghue, Jacqueline Genet, Warwick Gould, Bernard Hickey, John Kelly, Heinz Kosok, Peter Kuch, Alasdair Macrae, William M.Murphy, Andrew Parkin, Patrick Rafroidi, Ann Saddlemyer, Ronald Schuchard, Masaru Sekine, Michael Sidnell, C.K.Stead, Helen Vendler and George Watson, with opening and closing addresses by A. Norman Jeffares.

 

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‘Ulysses’, a Review of Three Texts

‘Ulysses’, a Review of Three Texts

£30.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm.     xviii, 232 pp.   1989  The Prince Grace Irish Library series (ISSN 0269-2619) volume 4
ISBN: 976-0-86140-314-1

Feeling that none of the existing editions of Ulysses adequately represented the text of the novel, Philip Gaskell and Clive Hart looked again at the evidence of Joyce's manuscripts, typescripts, and proofs, and have produced lists of suggested alterations for the three most important editions of the book: the first edition of 1922, the standard American edition of 1961, and the so-called 'corrected' edition of 1984. They believe that a copy of any of these editions, marked up with the alterations they propose, will result in a text closer to what Joyce intended in 1922 than any that has yet been achieved. What is offered here, in fact, is not a new edition of Ulysses, but a kit for repairing the major faults of existing editions.

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The Literary Works of Jack B. Yeats

The Literary Works of Jack B. Yeats

£33.00

There is far more to Jack Yeats than meets the eye, and it is to be hoped that he will soon be recognised as deserving of a place in the forefront of Irish letters. In recent years, however, his greatness as a painter has eclipsed his writings and this work seeks to redress the position. John Purser brings a knowledge of symbolism and language used in the West of Ireland to his study, and with the aid of previously unused evidence and a new chronology, new interpretations are given for many of Jack Yeats's works and an overall pattern is revealed.

The religious imagery of The Careless Flower and The Amaranthers is developed, and the significance of the theme of inheritance in the latter work is brought out for the first time, allowing the two halves of the novel to be seen more clearly as an integrated whole. The Charmed Life is shown to have an underlying Faustian and Christian significance, related to the progress of Ireland as a nation, and Ah Well is interpreted as a remarkable fable of a kind of Eden in reverse. Harlequin's Positions is interpreted as a riposte to Shaw and an assertion of Ireland's need and ability to maintain her independence in the face of the approaching war, and La La Noo, The Green Wave and In Sand are seen in part as approving extensions of that theme.

As well as his father, major literary figures recognised his genius – Synge (who shared a journey and vision of Ireland with him), Joyce (who recognised a shared methodology), his brother (who knew that few would recognise Jack's genius, though he saw it himself), and Beckett (who learned much from him and wrote in profound admiration of The Amaranthers). One day John Butler Yeats's prophecy, 'Some day I shall be remembered as the father of a great poet, and the poet is Jack', will come true.

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The Celtic Connection

The Celtic Connection

£38.00

The Celtic nations of Brittany, Cornwall, Ireland, the Isle of Man, Scotland and Wales are well known for their literature, mythology, poetry and song. This volume is a study of the linguistic and literary achievements of those nations and provides a much-needed overview of the condition of all the Celtic languages. By emphasising the connection, these studies taken together illuminate the whole Celtic domain.

As the Editor points out, the Celtic identity is not one of race – the genetic links, if they are there at all, just cannot be proved – but it is of a common linguistic and cultural heritage. The Celtic Connection focuses on the similarities and differences in language across the Celtic nations and contributes to the resurgence of interest in the Celtic identity which is increasingly being supported by official bodies, both national and international.

The collection commences with a description of the languages and origins of early Celtic society. Each language is then examined by a leading expert in linguistics and literature. All the contributors have written their contributions keeping in mind the theme of the title – the extent to which links among the Celtic peoples have (or, indeed, have not) been significant.

Contents: The Celtic Languages (Glanville Price) – The Early Celts (Miranda J. Green) – The Irish Language (Máirtín Ó Murchú) – Early Irish Literature (Pádraig Ó Riain) – Post-Norman Irish Literature (Séamus Mac Mathúna) – The Scottish Gaelic Language (John MacInnes) – Scottish Gaelic Literature (Derek S. Thomson) – Manx Language and Literature (Robert L. Thomson) – The Welsh Language, Its History and Structure (David Thorne) – The Welsh Language (Glanville Price) – Welsh Literature (David R. Johnston) – The Breton Language (Humphrey Ll. Humphreys) – Breton Literature (Rita Williams) – Cornish Language and Literature (Glanville Price) – The Celtic Connection Today (Glanville Price). With a Foreword, 'Brittany and Myself', by Prince Louis de Polignac.

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Vertue Rewarded, or The Irish Princess, ‘A New Novel’ (1693)

Vertue Rewarded, or The Irish Princess, ‘A New Novel’ (1693)

£8.99
21.6 x 13.8 cm.          Princess Grace Irish Library series (ISSN 0269-2619) volume 7

Published for the first, and (until now) only, time in 1693, this novel is set in Ireland immediately after the Battle of the Boyne, and describes the courtship of a young lady of Clonmel by a prince, who is on his way to take up a post in Limerick. The story is humorous and engaging. As the editor points out, its interest lies not only in it calling itself `A Novel', but that it may well have been known to Samuel Richardson, and influenced his Pamela (itself subtitled Virtue Rewarded), published fifty years later. This work can lay claim to being the first Irish novel ever published – certainly the earliest that is extant, and as such will be of interest to all students of literature in the English language.

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Rediscovering Oscar Wilde

Rediscovering Oscar Wilde

£38.00
The Princess Grace Irish Library 8

In the same way that students of Shakespeare discuss their `Supreme Quartet' of plays, so Irish Studies has its own quartet of writers – Yeats, Joyce, Beckett and Wilde – whose fame is outstanding and world-wide. Over the past years, conferences on all four members of this Irish quartet have been organised by the Princess Grace Irish Library of Monaco, the most recent, on Wilde, in 1993. The inclusion of Wilde in the quartet may surprise some, but it is an incontrovertible fact that scholars are coming to appreciate Wilde’s intrinsic importance as a writer, and as a major influence on 20th century literature.

Over the past years, conferences on all four members of this Irish quartet have been organised by the Princess Grace Irish Library of Monaco (the proceedings of each being published in this series), the most recent, on Wilde, in 1993. This collection of papers given then covers every aspect of Wilde's oeuvre, not only considering his plays, poetry and novels, but his family, his influence on writers both in English (such as Joyce and Stoppard) and in other languages (including, Martí, Darío, Borges and Lispector).

Quite how influential and far-reaching he has become can be seen by the names of the universities at which the contributors teach: Antonio Ballesteros González and Mariano Baselga (Universidad Autónoma, Madrid), Pia Brinzeu (Timisoara, Romania), Edward Burns (Liverpool), Richard Allen Cave (London), Davis Coakley (TCD), Jean M. Ellis D’Allessandro (Florence), Masolino D’Amico (Rome), Lawrence Danson (Princeton), Denis Donoghue (New York), Joseph Donohue (Massachusetts), Irène Eynat-Confino (Tel-Aviv), Michael Patrick Gillespie (Marquette, WI), Robert Gordon (London), Warwick Gould (London), Merlin Holland (Wilde’s grandson), Joel H. Kaplan (British Columbia), Patricia Kellogg-Dennis (Rider College, NJ), Melissa Knox (St Peter’s College, NJ), Jacques de Langlade (Paris), Donald Lawler (East Carolina, NC), Jerusha McCormack (UCD), Bart J. Moore-Gilbert (London), Isobel Murray (Aberdeen), Sylvia Oslermann (Jena), Norman Page (Nottingham), Keny Powell (Miami, Ohio); María Pilar Pulido (Lyon), Peter Ruby (Cambridge), Gerd Rohmann (Kassel), Roy Rosenstein (American University of Paris), Neil Sammells (Bath College), Ronald Schuchard (Emory), Theoharis Constantine Theoharis (MIT), Deirdre Toomey, Emmanuel Vemadakis (Angers), and Marie- Noelle Zeender (Nice).

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Beckett and Beyond

Beckett and Beyond

£35.00
21.6 x 13.8 cm

‘Beckett and Beyond’ a conference held at the Princess Grace Irish Library, Monaco, in 1991, gathered together thirty-two distinguished scholars, and so provided an unique opportunity to assess the works and career of the great Irish and European writer two years after his death. The conference proceedings, published here in a single volume, contain papers and addresses by his biographers, the editors of his correspondence and internationally known students of his plays and prose, including representatives of the Beckett Society and the Beckett Centre (Reading), and others from universities in Ireland, Britain, France, Italy, Spain, Norway and America.

The papers in this volume give a first in-depth view of the Beckett correspondence edited by Martha Fehsenfeld and Lois More Overbeck, and a wealth of material for the biographies by James Knowlson and Anthony Cronin, including the theatrical notebooks -- all discussed with the excitement of new discovery.

As well as a wide range of papers on individual works and series from all phases of the writer’s career and in all the media that he explored, subjects covered by the speakers include Beckett in relation to modernism, postmodernism, Dr Johnson, Joyce, Baudelaire, Camus, Freud, actors, directors, to his texts and his letters, to radio, television, video, film, and adaptations of his work.

Bruce Stewart was the Literary Adviser of the Princess Grace Irish Library, Monaco, and teaches Anglo-Irish Literature at the University of Ulster at Coleraine. He served as Assistant Editor of The Oxford Companion to Irish Literature edited by Robert Welch (1995).

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Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, The First Production

Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, The First Production

£40.00
Edited by Joseph Donohue with Ruth Berggren

21.0 x 27.4 cm   378 pp.  with 158 illus.  1995    Princess Grace Irish Library series (ISSN 0269-2619) volume 10

At its première 100 years ago on Saint Valentine's Day 1895, at the St James's Theatre in King Street, London, Oscar Wilde's `trivial comedy for serious people' The Importance of Being Earnest found great and immediate favour with audiences and critics alike. Yet, by early May, the play had disappeared from the stage, its author convicted of immoral offences and condemned to two years' imprisonment with hard labour. A century later, although Wilde's reputation has long since been restored and his last play for the stage become a timeless classic, much of the meaning and significance the work held for its contemporary audience has been lost or diluted.

The present edition fills this gap in understanding by reconstructing the original 1895 St James's Theatre production. The text itself, derived from theatrical typescripts, including the Lord Chamberlain's licensing copy and Charles Frohman's script for the American premiere, is profusely annotated and illustrated from contemporary sources and presented in a format that balances text and context. An extraordinary range of materials is thus combined to show or explain what the first performance of The Importance of Being Earnest was like in the theatre and how its audiences and critics received it.

Based upon a new, reconstructive method for the study of theatrical performance that aims to set the play securely in its historical and cultural moment, the edition offers a wealth of detail about the staging and acting of the play, including numerous first production and early revival photographs. The reconstructed text itself, remarkably close to the 1899 first edition seen through the press by Wilde himself, recaptures the essential comic vitality of the play that is familiar to audiences throughout the world.

This work will therefore appeal to readers, scholars, theatre practitioners, lovers of the theatre and of the writings of Oscar Wilde.

A Reconstructive Critical Edition of the Text of the First Production at St James's Theatre, London, 1895, Annotated and illustrated from contemporary sources, and edited, with introductory essays on the play and its text by Joseph Donohue with Ruth Berggren. This fully annotated edition of the play, with 158 contemporary illustrations, informs the general reader and scholar alike of all those points that are now likely to be missed, while also giving an overall view of the contemporary cultural and political background. It won the 1995 Barnard Hewitt Award for Outstanding Research in Theatre History.

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Images Of Joyce

Images Of Joyce

£45.00 each
Volume1 ISBN: 0-86140-409-2 / 978-0-86140-409-4 £45.00
Volume2 ISBN: 0-86140-410-6 / 978-0-86140-410-0 £45.00
The Pair ISBN: 0-86140-411-4 / 978-0-86140-411-7 £90.00

21.6 x 13.8 cm.  vol. 1  xii, 1-438 pp.  vol. 2  x, 439-859 pp.           1998                       Princess Grace Irish Library series (ISSN 0269-2619)  11

The two volumes which form the eleventh publication in the Princess Grace Irish Library Series contain the proceedings of the Twelfth International James Joyce Symposium held in Monte Carlo in June 1990 under the auspices of the Princess Grace Irish Library and the patronage of H.S.H. Rainier III, Sovereign Prince of Monaco.

The first volume contains general and biographical essays and those dealing with theoretical and linguistic matters, sources, influences and comparative studies, while the second deals with the individual works - Chamber Music, Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, and Finnegans Wake - workshops and living book reviews, the major addresses, as well as papers on W.B.Yeats and Joyce and on Jack B.Yeats, details of the conference programme and the Index.

In all, there are contributions from some eighty scholars, covering every aspect of Joyce criticism, as well as the texts of speeches and talks by H.S.H. Princess Caroline of Monaco, Michael W.J. Smurfit, Stephen J. Joyce, and Anne Yeats.

 

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That Other World

That Other World

£40.00

Volume 1 ISBN: 0-86140-417-2 / 978-0-86140-417-9 £40.00

Volume 2 ISBN: 0-86140-418-1 / 978-0-86140-418-6 £40.00

The Pair ISBN: 0-86140-419-X £80.00 / 978-0-86140-419-3

The Supernatural and the Fantastic in Irish Literature & its Contexts

As with every other region of Europe and the world, the traditional folklore of Ireland abounds with tales involving the supernatural and the fantastic, but nowhere else have these tales so influenced the literature and the shaping of that country, and no other country has produced so many world-famous authors whose work has shown those influences.

These intermingling themes were therefore the ideal subject for a symposium held at the Princess Grace Irish Library, Monaco, in May 1998 to which, reflecting the international interest in the subject, a host of international scholars contributed, and whose papers are published in these two volumes.

The subjects range from early Irish history and folklore to the present day, but mainly deal with nineteenth and twentieth century literature, from Gothic novels, Sheridan Le Fanu, Bram Stoker, and Oscar Wilde, through W.B.Yeats, Lord Dunsany, Elizabeth Bowen, Samuel Beckett, and Flann O'Brien, to Seamus Heaney and Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill.

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Hearts And Minds

Hearts And Minds

£45.00

The Princess Grace Irish Library’s 2000 symposium brought together Irish critics and historians to assess the state of culture and society in the 'long nineteenth century' – 1800-1922 – during which the Act of Union defined the form of government and representation in Ireland as well as, to a great extent, the forms of opposition. Besides investigating the nature of the Union – its strengths and weaknesses, its character and progress – this bicentenary collection considers questions of private conscience and popular consciousness, language and iconography, science and evangelism, Diaspora and disempowerment, terror and consent, memory and amnesia, separation and adherence in the connected spheres of society, politics and culture.

The contributors are Anthony Cronin, Thomas Bartlett, Síghle Breathnach-Lynch, Claire Connolly, Tom Dunne, Marianne Elliott, J. W. Foster, Roy Foster, Luke Gibbons, Liam Kennedy, Joep Leerssen, W. J. McCormack, James Murphy, Patrick O'Sullivan, Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh and Norman Vance. It is the thirteenth publication in the Princess Grace Irish Library Literary series (ISSN 0269-2619).

BRUCE STEWART is the Literary Adviser of the Princess Grace Irish Library, Monaco, and teaches Anglo-Irish Literature at the University of Ulster at Coleraine. He served as Assistant Editor of The Oxford Companion to Irish Literature edited by Robert Welch (1995). More recently he was responsible for the setting up of PGIL EIRData, a large-scale website dedicated to Irish literary and biographical information and containing at its heart a bio-bibliographical account of some 4,500 Irish authors of all periods. It was launched by Her Excellency Mary McAleese, President of Ireland, and H. S. H. Prince Albert during the symposium, and is located at http://www.pgil-eirdata.org.

Front cover illustration (continuing onto front flap): 'The Wedding of the Princess Aoife of Leinster with Richard de Clare, Earl of Pembroke (Strongbow)' by Daniel Maclise. More info →

The Irish Book Lover. An Irish Studies Reader

The Irish Book Lover. An Irish Studies Reader

£40.00
With an Introductory Lecture by Nicholas Allen and an Integrated Index by Bruce Stewart.

The Irish Book Lover ranks as the longest-lasting of all twentieth-century Irish literary journals, with a run of 227 issues published under the editorships of John S. Crone (1909-25), Séamus Ó Casaide (1928-1930) and Colm Ó Lochlainn (1930-57). As a bibliographical and reviewing journal rather than a forum for commentary, poetry or fiction, it is less often consulted than literary journals such as the Irish Review or The Bell but nevertheless illustrates with great clarity some of the key changes in modern Irish culture and society between 1909 and 1957.

While offering a unique source of information on older, antiquarian books in Ireland, The Irish Book Lover throws open a window on the attitude of the contemporary intelligentsia to works such as James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist and W. B. Yeats’s Responsibilities, the novels of Liam O’Flaherty and Kate O’Brien or those of less-remembered writers of the day such as Temple Lane and Mrs. Thomas Concannon. Though superseded by a variety of reviewing organs, it gives an inspiring example to Irish book lovers in our own time.

The Princess Grace Irish Library has compiled a sampler of the journal here, together with an index of the entire series. The present volume also contains the introductory lecture given by Dr. Nicholas Allen at the “Irish Book Lover” Symposium held in Monaco to commemorate the journal. The symposium was also afforded a planned opportunity to survey existing resources for Irish literary history in the company of fifteen Irish publishers, librarians, teachers, critics and – last but not least – owners of Irish-studies websites.

The present volume is mirrored on the PGIL EIRData website, giving access to a body of digitised text that embraces a wider selection of the long-running journal together with an electronic index of its pages. This new departure for Irish studies has been conducted by Dr. Bruce Stewart under the terms of a contract between the Ireland Fund of Monaco to the University of Ulster under the aegis of the Princess Grace Irish Library (Monaco).

Bruce Stewart was Lecturer in Irish Literary History and Bibliography at the University of Ulster and Literary Adviser (Conseiller Littèraire) of the Princess Grace Irish Library in Monaco and director of the Library’s Biennial Symposium Series. He has edited three volumes in the Princess Grace Irish Library series and managed the production of several more. His articles and essays have been published in several leading Irish journals including Irish Review and Studies. Born in Dublin and educated at Glenstal Abbey School, Trinity College, Dublin, and the University of California, he has studied, worked and taught in America, the Middle East and England as well as Northern Ireland.

Contents

Editor’s Preface

Nicholas Allen: Introductory Lecture

The Irish Book Lover: An Irish Studies Reader

The Irish Book Lover: An Integrated Index

Bruce Stewart: Afterword

Appendix I: Chronology of Issues

Appendix II: Participants & Programme

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