ReaperMan

The eleventh novel in the Discworld Series

 UK hbk: Victor Gollancz, 20,200 copies on 23 May 1991 (0-575-04979-0) repr. August 1991, September 1991, March 1995, then reissued as the Collector’s Edition, 5,400 copies on 22 May 1997 (0-575-06483-8)
Book proof: c.100 copies
Reissued in the Collector’s Edition binding, 2,300 copies, 31 March 1998 (0-575-6656-3)
Discworld Collector’s Library: The Death Collection (hbk, cover engraving by Joe McLaren): Gollancz, 7 November 2013 (978-1-473-20011-1)

Pbk: Corgi, 175,000 copies on 21/5/92 (0-552-13464-3), repr. 1992 (twice), 1993 (twice), 1994 (twice), 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, etc
New issue, with black/gold photographic design cover, on sale at same time as Kirby edition, April 2005 (0-552-15295-1)
Reissued B-format with modified Kirby cover: Corgi, October 2012 (978-0-552-16668-3)

Book Club: BCA, 12,500 copies in 1991 (CN 1660)
BCA’s Unseen Library: c.4,000 copies in 2004 (CN133990)   

USA pbk: 1) Roc (NAL) (cover illus. Darrell K.Sweet), 75,000 copies in July 1992 (0-451-45168-6)
By the fifth printing, the gold blocking on the front cover had been changed to orange with TP’s name in white.

2) Harper Torch, August 2002 (0-06-102062-1) Contains an extract from Night Watch at the end.
Copies were also bound up in a library binding and sold by Turtleback Books (0-613-01340-X)
Premium pbk: Harper Premium, 30 July 2013 (978-0-06-223735-4)

USA book club: Science Fiction Book Club Selection, August 1992 (Jacket art by Peter Scanlan) 30 July 1992 (ref. 00054)
Some – presumably the first printing – copies have the US bookclub binding and jacket (i.e. with the NAL device on the spine of the binding, and with the special bookclub jacket design and reference number), but a Gollancz title and verso. Copies with the NAL imprint were printed in Canada.

Brazilian: O senhor da foice, trs. Ludimili Hashimoto, Conrad, 2006 (85-7616-195-8)

Bulgarian: Жбитварят, trs. Vladimir Zarkov, Vuzev/Akhont-V, 2002 (954-422-075-5)

Czech: Sekáč, trs. Jan Kantůrek Talpress, 10,000 copies in October 1996 (80-7197-005-0)
Double volume with Witches Abroad: ills by Paul Kidby, Talpress, 2011 (978-80-7197-423-9)

Dutch: Maaierstijd, trs. Venugopalan Ittekot (pseud. of Ruurd Groot), Het Spectrum, 6,000 copies in March 1995 (90-274-4332-7)
Reissue: Mynx, 2008 (978-90-225-5123-3)
     Schijfwereldomnibus nr.4 (omnibus edition with Moving Pictures and Witches Abroad), Het Spectrum, ?5,000 copies ?August 2000 (90-274-6995-4)

Estonian: Vikatimees, trs. Kaaren Kaer, jacket illus. Hillar Mets, Varrak, August 2002 (9985-3-0584-1)

Finnish: Viikatemies, trs. Marja Sinkkonen, Karisto, 1994 (951-23-3537-9)
Pbk: Karisto, December 2001 (951-23-4112-3)

French: Le Faucheur, trs. Patrick Couton, L’Atalante, January 1998 (2-84172-066-7)
Reissue, with new introduction by Terry Pratchett (dated September 2014), 22 October 2015 (978-2-841721-739-1)
Omnibus: La Mort due Disque-Monde, containing Mort, Reaper Man and Soul Music, L’Atalante, 27 October 2011 (978-2-84172-558-8)

Pbk: Pocket, June 2002 (2-266-12135-9)
Pbk with Marc Simonetti cover: Pocket, January 2011 (978-2-266-21191-8)

German 1) trade pbk: Alles Sense!, trs. Andreas Brandhorst, Goldmann, 25,000 copies on 1 April 1994 (3-442-41551-9)
Mass market pbk: Goldmann, 20,000 copies on 1 December 1998 (3-442-42130-6)
Double volume: Voll im Bilde; Alles Sense!, Goldmann, August 2001 (3-442-45068-3)
2) trs. Regina Rawlinson, September 2011 (978-3-442-54696-1)
            Winner of a translation award ‘Stipendium des Freistaats Bayern, 2011’
Pbk new cover design: Goldmann, November 2015 (978-3-442-48377-8)

Hebrew: איש הקעיד, trs. Elizabeth Weigl, Kinneret, January 2000 (965-286-896-5)

Hungarian 1: A kaszás, trs. Anikó Sohár, Cherubion Könyvkiadó, c.4,000 copies in 2002 (963-9346-63-2)
2. Pbk:  A kaszás, trs. Veronika Farkas, Delta Vision, 13 November 2015 (978-963-395-147-7)

 Italian: Il tristo mietitore, trs. Valentina Daniele, Salani, 10 July 2008 (978-88-8451-967-2)
Black/gold cover design: TEA, February 2010 (978-88-502-2091-5)

Japanese: Choeisha, 1,500 copies on 22 October 2004 (4-88629-864-8)

Norwegian: Mannen med Ljåen, trs.Torleif Sjøgren-Erichsen, Tiden Norsk, 1,200 copies in September 2003 (82-10-04879-1)

Polish: Kosiarz, trs. Piotr W.Cholewa, Prószyński i S-ka, 12,000 copies in January 2001 (83-7255-743-8)

Romanian: Domnul cu Coasa, trs. Bogdan Mihăilescu, Rao, October 2009 (978-973-54-0007-1)

Russian: Мрачный Жнец, trs. N. Berdennikova, Eksmo, 10,100 copies on 16 April 2001 (5-04-007324-0)
Double volume with Mort: Eksmo, 5,000 copies printed on 23 October 2002 (5-699-0205-0); reprinted 2004 (978-5-699-74369-8)

Serbian/Yugoslav: Kosač, trs. Dejan Papić, Laguna/ReVision in their Octarin series, 2001 (86-7436-011-4)

Spanish: El Segador, trs. Cristina Macía, Martínez Roca, 1993 (84-270-1812-6)
Pocket book: Debols!llo/Plaza y Janés, November 2003 (84-9759-993-4; vol.342/12)
10th edition 1st repr. May 2015
Kiosk edition: Altaya, 2008 (with the cover design of Soul Music) (978-84-487-2608-9)

Swedish: Döden ligger lågt, trs. Peter Lindforss, Wahlströms ?August 1999 (91-32-32279-8)
Pbk: Wahlströms, February 2001 (91-32-43277-1)

Turkish: Tirpanli Adam, trs. Niran Elçi, Ithaki, 2008 (978-975-273-433-3)

Ukrainian: Old Lion [contracted, but not yet published]

 

Reviews

Terry Pratchett is simply the best humorous writer of the 20th century. Wodehouse, Waugh, Sharpe etc. all have their merits – sometimes considerable – but Pratchett really is a cut above the rest….
This is Pratchett’s eleventh Discworld novel and he continues to be enormously inventive and entertaining; he has moved a long way from the parodic fantasy roots of the early novels which has enabled him to widen the range of concerns to make him, as well as the funniest, the most humane of humorous writers.   Brendan Wignall in The Oxford Times

Under the guise of a knockabout piss-take of the conventions of Fantasy, this is an oddly touching elegy to a rural England that no longer exists, in this world at least. Death has to seek employment as – what else? – a reaper, and overcome the dreaded combine harvester, supermarkets are living, malevolent entities that threaten life and sanity. The whole recalls Tolkien’s Shire, with jokes. If you’re an established fan, you’ll enjoy this as much as the others; if you’re new to Pratchett, what the hell took you so long? Dominic Wells in Time Out

Everything has the inimitable Pratchett touch, with the supporting cast as precisely drawn as the main actors…. Pratchett must be the funniest British writer working today – in any genre.
Michael Cooban in Yorkshire Post

This brilliantly funny book is packed with witticisms which make it a first-rate and very colourful comedy.   Gina Sykes in Huddersfield Daily Examiner

Pratchett explodes an armory of carefully timed puns and pratfalls to great effect, and yet in Death’s narrative strand there is something more than finely-judged routines and patter, a sense of caritas and tempered melancholy which suggests Pratchett might be moving on from cunningly constructed narratives to those more felt that diagrammed, from the head to the heart.
Paul McAuley in Interzone/Million

Reaper Man will move swiftly into paperback and achieve the usual brilliant sales, and deservedly so, because it’s fun, easy reading and a quirky combination of bizarre and eclectic. Lucille Redmond in The Irish Press

The plot is bizarre enough to satisfy the most demanding reader….This is an anarchic adventure, with some very intelligent things to say about attitudes to death completely buried in farce and the odd second-hand joke. However it should be a landmark in the literary establishment’s treatment of shopping precincts.  Thomas Quinn in The List (Edinburgh)

It’s difficult to say anything about Pratchett that more eminent reviewers haven’t said previously. Pratchett is quite simply one of the best.   GMI

Astronomically successful.   Ronald J.Wright in Books

I was not prepared for the comic delight offered by Terry Pratchett’s spoof of the ‘fantasy’ genre…. With the exception of Ursula le Guin’s books, I cannot stand fantasy novels. But Pratchett’s novels are funny precisely because he never takes the genre seriously either.  Tom Wilkie in The Independent

He has only two peers – Douglas Adams (Hitchhikers Guide) and Ben Elton (the eco-terror fiction novelist rather than the comic) and he’s better than both of them.   New Musical Express

Funnier and more prolific than Douglas Adams (though comparisons still abound) Reaper Man could present that golden opportunity to find out just what you’ve been missing all this time. Recently, with the ever-increasing Discworld series of sci-fi/comedy novels, Pratchett has gone less for the quick gag with his writing in favour of character development and more intricate plots; perhaps to appeal to a wider and older audience. It works superbly here on several levels from the slapstick through to the eternal verities….. The jury may still be out on the TV adaptation of Truckers, but with a brand new Discworld novel out in hardback at the moment too – Small Gods – for me Pratchett just gets better and better.  Chris Parker in Centre Scene

Background illustration © and by courtesy of Marc Simonetti

 

Reviews

Terry Pratchett is simply the best humorous writer of the 20th century. Wodehouse, Waugh, Sharpe etc. all have their merits – sometimes considerable – but Pratchett really is a cut above the rest….
This is Pratchett’s eleventh Discworld novel and he continues to be enormously inventive and entertaining; he has moved a long way from the parodic fantasy roots of the early novels which has enabled him to widen the range of concerns to make him, as well as the funniest, the most humane of humorous writers.   Brendan Wignall in The Oxford Times

Under the guise of a knockabout piss-take of the conventions of Fantasy, this is an oddly touching elegy to a rural England that no longer exists, in this world at least. Death has to seek employment as – what else? – a reaper, and overcome the dreaded combine harvester, supermarkets are living, malevolent entities that threaten life and sanity. The whole recalls Tolkien’s Shire, with jokes. If you’re an established fan, you’ll enjoy this as much as the others; if you’re new to Pratchett, what the hell took you so long? Dominic Wells in Time Out

Everything has the inimitable Pratchett touch, with the supporting cast as precisely drawn as the main actors…. Pratchett must be the funniest British writer working today – in any genre.
Michael Cooban in Yorkshire Post

This brilliantly funny book is packed with witticisms which make it a first-rate and very colourful comedy.   Gina Sykes in Huddersfield Daily Examiner

Pratchett explodes an armory of carefully timed puns and pratfalls to great effect, and yet in Death’s narrative strand there is something more than finely-judged routines and patter, a sense of caritas and tempered melancholy which suggests Pratchett might be moving on from cunningly constructed narratives to those more felt that diagrammed, from the head to the heart.
Paul McAuley in Interzone/Million

Reaper Man will move swiftly into paperback and achieve the usual brilliant sales, and deservedly so, because it’s fun, easy reading and a quirky combination of bizarre and eclectic. Lucille Redmond in The Irish Press

The plot is bizarre enough to satisfy the most demanding reader….This is an anarchic adventure, with some very intelligent things to say about attitudes to death completely buried in farce and the odd second-hand joke. However it should be a landmark in the literary establishment’s treatment of shopping precincts.  Thomas Quinn in The List (Edinburgh)

It’s difficult to say anything about Pratchett that more eminent reviewers haven’t said previously. Pratchett is quite simply one of the best.   GMI

Astronomically successful.   Ronald J.Wright in Books

I was not prepared for the comic delight offered by Terry Pratchett’s spoof of the ‘fantasy’ genre…. With the exception of Ursula le Guin’s books, I cannot stand fantasy novels. But Pratchett’s novels are funny precisely because he never takes the genre seriously either.  Tom Wilkie in The Independent

He has only two peers – Douglas Adams (Hitchhikers Guide) and Ben Elton (the eco-terror fiction novelist rather than the comic) and he’s better than both of them.   New Musical Express

Funnier and more prolific than Douglas Adams (though comparisons still abound) Reaper Man could present that golden opportunity to find out just what you’ve been missing all this time. Recently, with the ever-increasing Discworld series of sci-fi/comedy novels, Pratchett has gone less for the quick gag with his writing in favour of character development and more intricate plots; perhaps to appeal to a wider and older audience. It works superbly here on several levels from the slapstick through to the eternal verities….. The jury may still be out on the TV adaptation of Truckers, but with a brand new Discworld novel out in hardback at the moment too – Small Gods – for me Pratchett just gets better and better.  Chris Parker in Centre Scene