History / Biography / Theatre History
George Otto Simms, A Biography

George Otto Simms, A Biography

£20.00

In this highly acclaimed biography, Lesley Whiteside traces the events and influences which shaped George Otto Simms's life, from his boyhood in Co. Donegal, through his education and early ministry in Ireland to his years as Bishop of Cork, Archbishop of Dublin, and finally Archbishop of Armagh. The author explores the academic and ecclesiastical aspects of his life, while much of the book is concerned with the sometimes difficult years in Dublin and Armagh, with ecumenical progress and the tragedy of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland.

`This is a well deserved biography and it has proved worthy of its subject'

Church Times

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Georgian Dublin

Georgian Dublin

£4.99

Twenty-five Views in Colour Aquatint
ISBN: 978-0-85105-425-4

10.7 x 14.8 cm landscape    xi, [53] pp.     25 full colour prints

Georgian Dublin is a pocket-sized edition of Malton's superb colour aquatints which show Dublin city in its finest age – the period in which the present layout of the city emerged and during which many of its classical buildings were erected. These lively and colourful prints open a window to the past and reveal scene after scene which, with one exception, can still be visited today. The views range from the great courtyard of Dublin Castle, past Gandon's riverfront masterpieces, the Custom House and the Four Courts, to the simple street scene at Capel Street bridge, peopled with the Dubliners of two centuries ago.

Malton's work originally appeared in the final decade of the eighteenth century and was highly praised on publication. He wrote in his announcement of the work that he was 'struck with admiration at the beauty of the capital of Ireland and was anxious to make a display of it to the world'.

'the most splendid illustrated book on Dublin.'

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All Cultivated People. A History of the United Arts Club, Dublin

All Cultivated People. A History of the United Arts Club, Dublin

£28.00

ISBN: 978-0-86140-266-3
21.6 x 13.8 cm.   xii, 296 pp. + 16pp. with 33 illus. 

Founded in 1907, the history of the Club reflects the creative life of the city and nation, with a membership of many of the leading literary and artistic figures of the last eighty years. Patricia Boylan chronicles the ups and downs it suffered, how it was affected by historical events, and describes the often colourful lives of its more famous members.

Contents: Genesis – The People and the Place – Celebrated Names – Limited Company – An Auspicious Year – Minute by Minute – A Shameful Year: 1913 – Sad Goodbyes – The Club in Wartime: 1914-1915 – Rebellions: 1916 – The Real Irish? 1916-1918 – Business as Usual: 1919-1920 – A Neutral Zone: 1921-1922 – Carrying On: 1923-1924 – Coming and Going: 1925-1929 – Betty Bolts – A Cold Eye: 1933-1939 – The End of an Era – Changing Times – Doldrums – The Latest Chapter

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Horace Plunkett: Co-operation and Politics, An Irish Biography

Horace Plunkett: Co-operation and Politics, An Irish Biography

£22.00

Horace Plunkett is remembered for his efforts to transform Irish agricultural practice, through the Co-operative Movement which he founded in 1889, and its administration via the Department of Agriculture, which he established ten years later.

From a protestant ascendancy background, Plunkett was one of those ‘fenian unionists' who were always able to see both sides of the Irish Question, and whose reforming zeal, and frank expression of opinion, during the period in which Ireland moved from benevolent Tory rule by Westminster, to independence for the south and partition of the island, brought him into conflict with all shades of political opinion.

This biography traces the development and interplay of his social and political philosophies, establishing Plunkett as the pioneer of modernisation of Ireland's principal industry, and as a political figure whose ideals and experience are of abiding interest.

 

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W.J.Turner, Poet and Music Critic

W.J.Turner, Poet and Music Critic

£30.00

21.6 x 13.8 cm.        xx,  257 pp.  index      1990

Born in Melbourne, Australia, in October 1884, W.J.Turner left his home city in March 1907, determined to create a career for himself as a writer in London. By 1946, when he died, he had contributed to the literary and musical life of England in ways that establish him as a unique and fascinating figure. A man of independent mind and provocative originality, he was perhaps the most outspoken critic of his time and, in Arnold Bennett's judgement, the only one of his generation whom it was a `pleasure to read for the sake of reading', as well as being a poet whose `majestic song' left Yeats, in his own words, `lost in admiration and astonishment'.

Wayne McKenna's work provides an overview of Turner's life and work, discussing his plays, novels, short stories, poetry drama criticism and literary editing, and well as commenting on the more important literary friend ships in his life, such as those with Yeats, Siegfried Sassoon, and Lady Ottoline Morrell.

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The House of Peter: The History of the Vatican

The House of Peter: The History of the Vatican

£12.95

21.6 x 13.8 cm.     viii, 145 pp.   + 8pp. illus   
ISBN: 978-0-905715-33-9

The author of this book has succeeded where many have failed: he has written the history of the Vatican, the House of Peter, from the days the first Christian martyrs were executed on the Vatican Hill, to the present, and he presents us with an account the reader will find difficult to put down.

The book’s outstanding quality is that it complements and enhances the splendid and sumptuous impression the Vatican gives today with St Peter’s Basilica in its centre and surrounded on one side by Bernini’s colonnades, and on the others by the many palaces which serve as residences and museums.

Reading this book we see far beyond the familiar façade of the Vatican: there is nothing boring about this kind of history; for example, the author’s description of the erection of the obelisk in St Peter’s Square makes the reader view that familiar landmark with a far greater understanding of the tremendous feat that was accomplished. Here, and elsewhere, the author’s narrative is complemented by largely unknown illustrations from the Vatican Archives.

Count Antonio Alberti-Poja was ideally placed to write on the subject: he was one of the consultori (member of the Council of State) of the Vatican City State, and Head of the Administrative Council of Peregrinato ad Petri Sedem for foreign visitors to the See of St Peter.

The author’s deep commitment to, and care for, the millions of visitors who come to the Vatican provided the motive, and his position in the government of the Vatican City State gave him the opportunity for his research, but neither would have guaranteed such an absorbing narrative.

To those who have visited the Vatican in the past,, it will bring back memories and probably change many concepts formed by that overpowering edifice that greets today’s visitors and pilgrims. After reading The House of Peter, those who come to the Vatican – for the first time or as seasoned visitors – will see the Holy City in a new light, looking beyond the splendid façade and the other works created by man for the greater glory of God, back through time to that first, small memorial that marked the grave of the rock of the Church, the Apostle Peter.

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The Playwright & the Pirate. Bernard Shaw & Frank Harris: A Correspondence

The Playwright & the Pirate. Bernard Shaw & Frank Harris: A Correspondence

£35.00

Edited and with an introduction by Stanley Weintraub

A more incongruous friendship than the one reflected in this correspondence is hard to imagine. Shaw is now remembered as the loading playwright of his time, and one of era's most memorable wits; Harris has become notorious for his near-pornographic My Life and Loves, and for a humourless (and disintegrating) sense of self-importance. At one time, Harris had been one of the later nineteenth century's most visible literary figures, a friend of such dissimilar people as Lord Randolph Churchill and Oscar Wilde, an editor of the London Evening News at 29, then editor of the Fortnightly Review and the Saturday Review, whose theatre critic Shaw became. Never quite respectable, Harris had been tolerated — even courted — as an amiable vulgarian when he was a rising star. However, his booming voice and four-letter language, his inability to look like anything other than an Albanian highwayman even when dressed in tails, his gluttonous gormandising and insatiable womanising, quickly made him a pariah in Edwardian circles as his career began to slip and he began to snatch at shady quick-money opportunities.

While Harris's career was hitting bottom, and doing it often, Shaw's reputation as playwright and publicist was growing. However strained Shaw's loyalties to his former editor became, they persisted, and both the strains and loyalties emerge in a generation of their correspondence. The 121 letters in this volume, spanning more than 35 years, reveal much of the private men and become in effect a pair of parallel autobiographies. Letters previously published — such as Shaw's famous remembrance to Harris of Oscar Wilde and his hilarious spoof-Harrisian biography of himself—are now published for the first time in accurate and complete texts, as is Shaw's memorable letter about his sex-life, which he insisted Harris expurgate when, in Harris's last, money-short years, he seized at a publisher's advance to write his former employee's biography. In the end Shaw completed it, in his own fashion, for Harris's widow.

Through these pages emerge the literary and political life of Edwardian and Georgian England, and wartime America, via Shaw's wit and ebullience and Harris's pomposity and paranoia. And in the relationship of the correspondents is a drama of two personalities whom Harris saw as having shared a heyday before one fell upon bad luck. To Harris it was a melodrama, to Shaw a tragicomedy.

Stanley Weintraub,was Research Professor and Director of the Institute for the Arts and Humanistic Studies at The Pennsylvania State University. Apart from numerous other books, he is author or editor of more than a dozen books on Shaw, including Private Shaw and Public Shaw, Journey to Heartbreak, and The Portable Bernard Shaw. He is also editor of SHAW, The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies, successor to The Shaw Review.

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Shaw, Lady Gregory, & the Abbey: A Correspondence and a Record

Shaw, Lady Gregory, & the Abbey: A Correspondence and a Record

£25.00

22.8 x 15.0 cm.  

Bernard Shaw, who made his international reputation as a playwright in London, and Augusta Gregory, founder-director of the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, are generally considered as belonging to different theatrical traditions. But in 1909, when the Abbey produced The Shewing-up of Blanco Posnet, which had been banned in England, there began a close involvement of Shaw with Irish theatre and a warm personal friendship with Lady Gregory.

The complete surviving correspondence between the two, published for the first time, reveals their developing relationship: the battle with Dublin Castle over Blanco, Shaw’s support for Lady Gregory in the rows over Synge’s Playboy in America; the controversy with military authorities over O’Flaherty V.C., written for the Abbey in 1915; the lively exchange of views on Ireland, politics, the Hugh Lane pictures, the schooling of the Gregory grand­children; which ended only with Lady Gregory’s death in 1932.

Drawing upon letters to and from other corre­spondents, diaries and engagement books, private memoranda, newspaper reports, and press releases, the editors have enlarged the correspondence into a comprehensive record of Shaw’s important and previously unrecognised contribution to the Irish theatre. Shaw and Lady Gregory’s crisp, witty and informal letters, in the context of their joint commitment to the Abbey, make the book rewarding reading for all those with an interest in the theatre.

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Florence Farr, Bernard Shaw’s ‘New Woman’

Florence Farr, Bernard Shaw’s ‘New Woman’

£25.00

ISBN 978-0-901072-15-3

Florence Farr: Bernard Shaw's 'New Woman' is the first biography of an unjustly neglected figure. Florence Farr was a member of the occult Order of the Golden Dawn, and was closely connected with Bernard Shaw and W.B.Yeats; to the first she was a mistress and companion, in the second it was probably a spiritual relationship only. For years the unrevealed facts of her life have in part caused a void in both their biographies. She sought spiritual as well as physical independence, and she achieved intellectual recognition when it was unfashionable for women to do so.

She was a mystic, and author, and a valiant although not superior actress in the years when it was not absolutely necessary to be the prototype of Ibsen's new woman. It is not so much her sentiments for Yeats and Shaw that appeal to us now, years after their deaths, but theirs for Florence Farr.

This timely book fills a gap in the literary history of the turn of the century, and the author has been fortunate in being able to use hitherto unpublished correspondence and manuscripts by her subject.


Contents

1. William Farr, 1807-1883
2. The Beginning of a New Woman: Queen's College and Edward Emery
3. Hammersmith and Bedford Park, 1889-1890
4. Bernard Shaw and Florence Farr: The New Drama, 1891-1897
5. The Golden Dawn and Other Mysteries, 1890-1904
6. The Music of Speech, 1890-1906
7. Florence and John Quinn, 1907
8. The New Woman as Journalist, 1907-1908
9. 'Second always , . . yet this is you', 1907-1912
10. Ceylon, 1912-1917
Index

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Medieval and Modern Ireland

Medieval and Modern Ireland

£25.00

ISBN 978-0-86140-289-2

All the papers in Medieval and Modern Ireland were presented at the eighteenth annual international conference of the Canadian Association for Irish Studies, held at Calgary, Alberta, in February 1985. The conference theme, Medieval and Modern Ireland, was chosen by the organising committee for its intrinsic merits, and as a reasonable extension of the theme of the previous conference which focused on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Readers of this volume will be struck by the pervasiveness of the connections between the medieval and the modern in Ireland and the Irish, artists in particular, and realise why James Joyce could hardly avoid linking the modern Irish artist with the medieval Irish monk, as he does in the bitter musings of Stephen Dedalus, who walks alone into eternity along Sandymount Strand: ‘You were going to do wonders, what? Missionary to Europe after fiery Columbanus.’

The contributors are Hallvard Dahlie, Ann Dooley, John Wilson Foster, Brian John, Toni O’Brien Johnson, Heinz Kosok, F. X. Martin O.S.A., and Wolfgang Zach.

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Mrs S.C. Hall: A Literary Biography

Mrs S.C. Hall: A Literary Biography

£36.00

21.6 x 13.8 cm.   xii, 260 pp.  1997   Irish Literary Studies series (ISSN 0140-895X) volume 50

In 1829 Mrs S.C.Hall, an Irishwoman living in England, published a book of sketches set mainly in her native Wexford. Sketches of Irish Life and Character was an immediate success both with literary critics and the general public. A second series of Sketches appeared in 1831 and established Mrs Hall's reputation in  England as an interpreter of Irish character. Her later works on Ireland – Lights and Shadows of Irish Life (1838), Stories of the Irish Peasantry (1840) and The Whiteboy (1845) – reinforced this view, and were very popular with her English and Scottish readers. She collaborated with her husband, the journalist Samuel Carter Hall, in the writing of a three-volume guide to Ireland, Halls' Ireland, its Scenery, Character, etc. (1841-43), and this too was accepted as an informed description of Irish life and character.

In fact, Mrs Hall wrote as an observer imbued with colonial attitudes who believed in the superiority of everything English. Out of a genuine love for Ireland, however, she wished to make the country better known and understood in England, and she hoped through her writings to cure the Irish people of their faults. What makes her work interesting is the fact that it displays a tolerance and a lack of bigotry that was unusual for its time, and that she is openly critical (especially in her novel The Whiteboy) of government mismanagement and misrule.

CONTENTS

1. Ireland – 'The Great Mart of Fiction'; 2. Mrs Hall – Marriage and Markets; 3. Teaching – The Taste of the Times; 4. Sketches of Irish Life – The Voice of the Colonist; 5. Lights and Shadows – a melancholy book; 6. Stories of the Irish Peasantry – Correcting the 'evil habits of poor Pat'; 7. Halls' Ireland – 'Guidance for those who design to visit Ireland; 8. The Whiteboy –' 'A truly national novel'; 9. Three novelists with a common cause; 10. Assessments – then and now; Index.

Maureen Keane was educated at Dominican College, Eccles Street, Dublin, and University College, Dublin. After graduating with an M.A. she worked for a time as a teacher and then took up a career in journalism, first as a freelance and then as an editor. Returning to academic life, she received her Ph.D. from Maynooth College for a study of didacticism in the works of William Carleton, Mrs S.C.Hall and Charles Lever. This is her first book.

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The Insurrection in Dublin

The Insurrection in Dublin

£6.99

With sepia reproductions of 24 contemporary postcards of scenes from the Rising.

The Insurrection in Dublin was first published in October 1916, barely six months after the Irish Volunteers’ Easter Rising took place. The text was never revised so that it has retained the sense of immediacy that makes it one of the classic works of the period.

James Stephens is best known as the author of The Crock of Gold and The Demi Gods as well as for his poetry, but as AE wrote in his review of this work: ‘he has the most vivid senses of any Irishman now writing. He kept a journal day by day, writing down what saw with those keen eyes of his. They are the eyes of the poet and storyteller interested a thousand times more in the character of life, in studying behaviour under abnormal circumstances, than in any other aspects of the rising.’ These qualities have kept this book recurrently in print.

John A. Murphy, who was Professor of Irish History at University College Cork, NUI, has contributed an Introduction and Afterword which set the Rising in its historial context, and assess the impact that it had on Ireland at the time and the subsequent events that led up to the foundation of the Irish Free State.

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The Art of the Amateur 1916-1920

The Art of the Amateur 1916-1920

£30.00

ISBN: 978-0-85105-372-1

21.6 x 13.8 cm   368 pp.  1984    Volume 5 of  The Modern Irish Drama, a documentary history

The Art of the Amateur, the fifth volume in the documentary history, The Modern Irish Drama, describes and documents the Irish theatre from 1916-1920, some of the most turbulent years of the emerging nation. Against the background of the Easter Rising in Dublin and its violent aftermath, and of the Great War in Europe, the authors chart how the Irish theatre coped with, mirrored, and curiously, often ignored the trauma of the times.

As the authors of The Art of the Amateur note, the theatre, especially the theatre as entertainment, flourishes in times of public horror. With the deaths of Pearse, MacDonagh, MacSwiney and Sean Connolly, the Abbey player, there was more than enough horror. If few masterpieces immediately emerged, the stage in the period covered in this volume, both public and private, was being set for the emergence of the plays of Sean O’Casey and Denis Johnston.

The Modern Irish Drama, of which The Art of the Amateur is the fifth volume, is a documentary history with transcriptions of contemporary reviews and full cast lists. As The Irish Press commented, ‘Professor Hogan and his distinguished collaborators . . . have produced a rich, fascinating and, to the drama-junkie, indispensable book on a generally neglected period of Irish theatrical history.’

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Robert Gregory 1881-1918

Robert Gregory 1881-1918

£6.99

A Centenary Tribute, with a foreword by his children

"In the centenary clamour of 1982 and the celebrations and reconsiderations of O Conaire, Joyce, Stephens and Woolf, Colin Smythe's slim Robert Gregory . . . might easily have been overlooked. It appears, however, that the editor of Books Ireland found it beguiling – and so does this reviewer. For one thing, although it is a centenary tribute, Robert Gregory exudes grace and charm; it lends itself to appreciation rather than to contentiousness, and it convinces the reader, utterly, that Gregory, if not our 'Sidney and our perfect man', was a Renaissance figure whose early death might have been an illustration for the maxim that whom the gods love die young. . . .

"[It] is not of interest merely because of Gregory's connections with literary and artistic life, fascinating as they are. It is a montage of poetry, reminiscences and many illustrations and photographs which, though they underline the connections, ultimately serve to illuminate the man. This book is not – contrary to what the reader might think at first glance – in the least ephemeral. One wants to leaf through it again and again, so strong, and yet so evocative, is the sense of Gregory which it imparts." Janet Madden-Simpson, in Books Ireland

 

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Thoor Ballylee, Home of W.B.Yeats

Thoor Ballylee, Home of W.B.Yeats

£8.50 (€10.00)

24.5 x 17.5 cm.    32 pp.   with 16 illus.   Third edition, with extra illus.  1995
(First published by Dolmen Press in 1965, 2nd edition 1977)

In 1917 the Norman Tower at Ballylee in the West of Ireland was adopted by W.B. Yeats as his home. But the tower was much more than his residence. It became his monument and symbol. Here he conceived and wrote some of his greatest poetry, and in his inscription to commemorate its restoration he pre­dicted the ruinous state into which the building lapsed after his death. The restoration of the Tower in the 1960s was inspired mainly by the enthusiasm of the Kiltartan Society and Mary Hanley. Liam Miller edited and extended Mrs Hanley’s text to set Yeats’s occupancy in a historical context. The illustrations include plans of the Tower, a map of the locality, photographs taken in the years when Yeats lived there, and some sketches by Lady Gregory.

The front cover illustration is of T. Sturge Moore’s design for the front cover and jacket of the first edition of The Tower (1928) as it appeared when blocked on the book.

 

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Studying Oscar Wilde: History, Criticism, & Myth

Studying Oscar Wilde: History, Criticism, & Myth

£25.00

22.8 x 15.3 cm. 248 pp. 1880-1920 British Authors Series no. 22

Studying Oscar Wilde: History, Criticism, and Myth takes issue with many assumptions current in Wilde scholarship. It sets an engaging course in exploring Wilde’s literary reputation. In particular, Professors Guy and Small are interested in the tension between Wilde’s enduring popularity with the general reading public as a perennially witty entertainer and his status among academics as a complex, politicised writer attuned to the cultural and philosophical currents associated with modernity. Their argument focuses initially on the prominence of biographical readings of Wilde’s literary works, drawing attention to the contradictions in the ways biographers have described his life and to the problems of seeing his writing as a form of self-disclosure.

Subsequent chapters assess the usefulness of other forms of academic scholarship to understanding works that are not, on the surface, “difficult.” Here a number of commonly held views are challenged. To what extent is De Profundis autobiographical? How sophisticated is the learning exhibited in Intentions? In what ways are the society comedies “about” homosexuality? And how does The Picture of Dorian Gray relate to Wilde’s “mature” style?

The volume also examines some of Wilde’s lesser-known, unfinished works and scenarios, including The Cardinal of Avignon, La Sainte Courtisane, and A Florentine Tragedy (all printed as appendices), arguing that these “failed” works provide important insight into the reasons for Wilde’s popular success.

Since Guy and Small have authored numerous articles and books on Wilde, Studying Oscar Wilde: History, Criticism, and Myth will be a must read for scholars, but it is also written in a jargon-free language that will speak to that wider audience of readers who enjoy Oscar Wilde.

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Strangers to That Land

Strangers to That Land

£33.00

21.6 x 13.8 cm.      xii, 315 pp.  + 16 pp. with 19 illus.  1994   Ulster Editions & Monographs series (ISSN 0954-3392) volume 5

Strangers to that Land, subtitled ‘British Perceptions of Ireland from the Reformation to the Famine’, is a critical anthology of English, Scottish and Welsh colonists’ and travellers’ accounts of Ireland and the Irish from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.

It consists exclusively of eyewitness descriptions of Ireland given by writers using the English language who had never been to Ireland before and were seeing the country for the first time. Each extract, where necessary, is set in context and briefly explained. The result is a vivid, continuous record of Ireland as defined and judged by the British over a period of four centuries.

In their general introduction the editors discuss the significance of these changing historical perceptions, as well as the impact upon them of literary conventions which played a part in shaping the emerging texts. It is argued that the relationship between Ireland and England within a British context constitutes a unique case study in the procedures of racial stereotyping and colonial representation, the exploration of cultural conflict and the aesthetics of travel writing.

There are twenty-one contemporary illustrations  in this, the fifth volume in the Ulster Editions and Monographs series.

 

Andrew Hadfield is lecturer in Medieval and Renaissance Literature at the University of Wales, and John McVeagh is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Ulster at Coleraine.

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Lady Gregory, Fifty Years After

Lady Gregory, Fifty Years After

£38.00

It is now over fifty years since the death of Augusta Gregory, who as a playwright, folklorist, essayist, poet, translator, editor, theatre administrator and nationalist, contributed so much and so uniquely to the realisation of modern Ireland. Yet soon after her death she seemed to be virtually forgotten, and the words on her gravestone – ‘she shall be remembered for ever’ – had a very hollow ring about them.

It has only been in the last twenty-five years that Lady Gregory’s reputation has turned round, beginning with Elizabeth Coxhead’s biography, and the subsequent appearance of the Coole Edition of her works. The publication of Mary Lou Kohfeldt's biography in 1985 and now the appearance of this volume – the first collection of essays to be devoted to her – must surely create a greater awareness of her importance as a cornerstone of the Irish Literary Revival.

Her books and plays, together with her work for the Abbey as manager, playwright, play-reader and fund-raiser, have had an influence on the literary life of Ireland in the first half of this century that has been greatly underestimated.

This collection opens with fragments of memory about Lady Gregory, and then brings together leading critics to write about various aspects of her life, her work, and her friendships with Yeats, W. S. Blunt, Sean O’Casey, John Quinn, and Douglas Hyde. There is also a checklist of her contributions to periodicals (over 180 items so far discovered), and an assessment of the work of her son, Robert Gregory.

Fragments of memory come from George Moore, The Sunday Herald (Boston), Signe Toksvig, Sean O’Casey, The Rt. Rev. Arnold Harvey, Anne Gregory, W. B. Yeats, Anne Yeats, Maire nic Shiubhlaigh, W. G. Fay, Brinsley MacNamara and Gabriel Fallon.

The contributors are Andrew E. Malone, Mary FitzGerald, Mary Lou Kohfeldt Stevenson, Brian Jenkins, James Pethica, Elizabeth Longford, Daniel J. Murphy, Gareth W. Dunleavy, Maureen Murphy, John Kelly, Richard Allen Cave, Ronald Ayling, Robert Welch, Bernard Shaw, Dan H. Laurence, Lorna D. Young, Ann Saddlemyer, Colin Smythe.

INTRODUCTION. Ann Saddlemyer and Colin Smythe
Acknowledgements
CHRONOLOGY. Colin Smythe
FRAGMENTS OF MEMORY
Pen Portraits: George Moore Sunday Herald (Boston) Signe Toksvig Sean O'Casey
The Chatelaine of Coole: The Rt. Rev. Arnold Harvey, Anne Gregory, W. B. Yeats, Anne Yeats, Sean O'Casey, W. B. Yeats
At the Abbey Theatre: Maire nic Shiubhlaigh W. G. Fay Brinsley MacNamara Gabriel Fallon
LADY GREGORY, 1852–1932. Andrew E. Malone
'PERFECTION OF THE LIFE': LADY GREGORY'S AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL WRITINGS. Mary FitzGerald
THE CLOUD OF WITNESSES. Mary Lou Kohfeldt Stevenson
THE MARRIAGE. Brian Jenkins
LADY GREGORY AND WILFRID SCAWEN BLUNT. Elizabeth Longford
'A WOMAN'S SONNETS'. Lady Gregory, with a Commentary by James Pethica
'DEAR JOHN QUINN''. Daniel J. Murphy
THE PATTERN OF THREE THREADS: THE HYDE-GREGORY FRIENDSHIP. Gareth W. Dunleavy
LADY GREGORY AND THE GAELIC LEAGUE. Maureen Murphy
LADY GREGORY AND SEAN O'CASEY: AN UNLIKELY FRIENDSHIP REVISITED. Ronald Ayling
'FRIENDSHIP IS ALL THE HOUSE I HAVE': LADY GREGORY AND W. B. YEATS. John Kelly
A LANGUAGE FOR HEALING. Robert Welch
NOTE ON LADY GREGORY'S PLAYS. Bernard Shaw, edited by Dan H. Laurence
FOUR FRENCH COMEDIES: LADY GREGORY'S TRANSLATIONS OF MOLIÈRE. Mary FitzGerald
IN RETROSPECT: LADY GREGORY'S PLAYS FIFTY YEARS LATER. Lorna D. Young
THE GLORY OF THE WORLD AND THE PEASANT MIRROR. Ann Saddlemyer
LADY GREGORY'S CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERIODICALS: A CHECKLIST. Colin Smythe
APPENDIX: ROBERT GREGORY: ARTIST AND STAGE DESIGNER. Richard Allen Cave
Notes
Notes on Contributors
Index

 

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Poets and Dreamers

Poets and Dreamers

£30.00

General Editors of the Coole Edition: T. R. Henn CBE and Colin Smythe

With a Foreword by T. R. Henn

ISBN: 978-0-900675-35-5

Studies and Translations from the Irish, including nine plays by Douglas Hyde

22.7 x 13.8 cm.  286 pp.    illus.  1974   Volume 11 of the Coole Edition of Lady Gregory's works

In Poets and Dreamers Lady Gregory has gathered together a number of essays and translations she had made from the Irish of Douglas Hyde, An Craoibhin Aoibhinn, ‘the Sweet Little Branch’, who was founder and President of the Gaelic League at the time and later to be the first President of the Republic of Ireland.

Lady Gregory has also written about other poets in this volume, notably Raftery, who was the model for Yeats’s Red Hanrahan, and also writes about West Irish ballads, and those by Jacobite and Boer and that beautiful poem by the expatriate Shemus Cartan, ‘A Sorrowful Lament for Ireland’.

Her other essays are covered by the Dreamers part of the title, ‘Mountain Theology’, ‘Herb Healing’ and ‘Workhouse Dreams’ among them. This edition contains a further five plays by Hyde, translated by Lady Gregory, three of which have not hitherto been published.

The Ap­pendices contain a number of early versions of poems and articles and includes ‘Dreams that have no moral’ by W. B. Yeats. This has been added from his Celtic Twilight (1902) as an Appendix in order to give an example as to how Lady Gregory worked together with him in providing him with material for his volumes. Lady Gregory refers to the story in ‘Workhouse Dreams’.

The Editors have also added a quant­ity of her revisions and an essay, ‘Cures by Charms’, which first appeared in the Westminster Budget with two of the other essays in this volume, but which was not included in the first edition.

 

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Denis Johnston, A Retrospective

Denis Johnston, A Retrospective

£38.00

Published to mark Johnston's eightieth birthday, when he was the doyen of Ireland's living playwrights, this volume brings together memories from friends and critical essays on his work and achievement by leading scholars – John Boyd, Curtis Canfield, Richard Allen Cave, Mark Culme-Seymour, Cyril Cusack, Hilton Edwards, Maurice Elliott, Harold Ferrar, Robert Hogan, Thomas Kilroy, Roger McHugh, Micheál mac Liammóir, D.E.S.Maxwell, Vivian Mercier, Christopher Murray, B.L.Reid, Joseph Ronsley and Christine St Peter – together with a checklist of Denis Johnston's writings compiled by the editor of this volume.

Included as an appendix are some recent revisions by Denis Johnston to his A Bride for the Unicorn.

CONTENTS
Introduction
List of Illustrations
AN APPRECIATION. Hilton Edwards
THE OLD LADY SAYS `NO!' Micheál MacLiammóir
THE OLD LADY: IN PRINCIPIO. Christine St Peter
WAITING FOR EMMET. D.E.S.Maxwell
A NOTE ON THE NATURE OF EXPRESSIONISM AND DENIS JOHNSTON'S PLAYS. Curtis Canfield
THE MOON IN THE YELLOW RIVER: DENIS JOHNSTON'S SHAVIANISM. Thomas Kilroy
DENIS JOHNSTON'S HORSE LAUGH. Robert Hogan
JOHNSTON, TOLLER AND EXPRESSIONISM. Richard Allen Cave
THE GOLDEN CUCKOO: `A VERY REMARKABLE BIRD'. Christopher Murray
'HE IS ALWAYS JUST ROUND THE NEXT CORNER.' DENIS JOHNSTON'S IN SEARCH OF SWIFT . Maurice Elliott
'A HUMANE AND WELL-INTENTIONED PIECE OF GALLANTRY': DENIS JOHNSTON'S THE SCYTHE AND THE SUNSET Joseph Ronsley
THE ENDLESS SEARCH. John Boyd
THE PLAYS OF DENIS JOHNSTON. Roger McHugh
DEAR DENIS! Cyril Cusack
DENIS JOHNSTON'S SPIRITUAL QUEST. Harold Ferrar
JOHNSTON IN ACADEME. B.L. Reid
WITH DENIS JOHNSTON IN THE WESTERN DESERT. Mark Culme-Seymour
PERFECTION OF THE LIFE OR OF THE WORK. Vivian Mercier
CHECKLIST-LIST OF DENIS JOHNSTON'S WRITINGS. Joseph Ronsley
APPENDIX: REVISIONS TO A BRIDE FOR THE UNICORN, ETC. Denis Johnston
Notes on Contributors
Index

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